Can you use Stork to make butter icing?

(32 Posts)
FairMidden Wed 08-Apr-09 16:52:35

And if so, what's the recipe? blush

Thanks!

Yes, my MIL does regularly.

I do not eat her cakes.

modernart Wed 08-Apr-09 16:55:49

No, then it would be margarine icing

Surely it will taste horrible?

moondog Wed 08-Apr-09 16:56:42

I wouldn't use Stork to cleanmy shoes let alone eat it. Yuck.

My MIL uses stork with caster/gran sugar if she runs out of icing sug - tis like marg with sand in <double boak>

If you have icing sug I would just go for some plain water based icing to drizzle on top (lemon juice/icing sug if it will go with flavour of cake) - anyting but stork icing!

purpleduck Wed 08-Apr-09 17:02:25

I concur

I do. blush My mum always has done.

Is it better with normal butter? Should I stop using Stork in the actual cakes as well as the icing?

They always taste OK (I think).

RustyBunny Wed 08-Apr-09 17:04:20

Only if you really can't tell Stork from butter...

I have used a soft margarine occasionally, but it was pretty revolting really - I'd only do it if I was desperate & I was going to add some other kind of flavouring.

Having said that I haven't used margarine for years, so they may taste better these days!

The recipe I use to fill a 7" cake, (double it to top as well)
2oz butter
4 oz sieved icing sugar
Few drops of vanilla essence (or use sugar that's been stored with a vanilla pod)

Cream butter, gradually add icing sugar and cream together.

You can add a few drops of almond or coffee essence, or grated orange/lemon zest + a spoonful of juice, or about an ounce of melted chocolate.

TrillianEAstraEgg Wed 08-Apr-09 17:05:35

I do. It's fine.

Icing sugar has to be real icing sugar. Butter does not have to be real butter. I've never had any complaints, or any comments of 'this isn't real butter'.

I once made a batch of cakes (with stork inside and in icing), took them to work, people started eating them, then new girl turned up and said 'I don't think I can have that as I can't tolerate a lot of dairy'. Did anyone say anything? No. I had to point out that it was fake butter so she was okay.

In a side-by-side taste test I think most people would be able to tell. On its own, I doubt they will notice anything.

TrillianEAstraEgg Wed 08-Apr-09 17:06:17

The packet of icing sugar usually has instructions on the back for proportions of butter (or marge-type-stuff) to icing sugar.

Alibabaandthe40bunnies Wed 08-Apr-09 17:08:28

I use Stork in cakes but not in icing - I would go for the drizzle option I think rather than make 'stork icing'.

Does it really taste ok?? hmm I am prepared to be persuaded, I may make a little at the weekend to test

TheProvincialLady Wed 08-Apr-09 17:12:36

I can't believe it tastes like anything other than cooking fat, sorry. Is there a reason for using Stork instead of butter, except in cases where an emergency cake is required and the butter retailers are all closed? Or is it a lot cheaper than butter (I don't buy any margarine these days so wouldn't know).

I would use it in the cake but definitely not in the icing, personally.

FairMidden Wed 08-Apr-09 19:04:36

Well, I'm reporting back.

It was kind of greasy - I know butter's greasy too but you know how margarine is slimier? It was like that. It didn't taste as creamy either.

It'll serve me right not to take a shopping list. Never mind, DP's urge for butterfly cakes will be satisfied and I doubt he'll complain [perfect woman emoticon] grin

Trillian, Stork is not dairy free as far as I can remember

TrillianEAstraEgg Thu 09-Apr-09 00:06:21

No Marmaduke, but on the ingredients list 'buttermilk' comes after salt, so it's not exactly a major ingredient.

The girl in question actually said that she thought she had grown out of her physical problems with milk (possible? who knows?) but still didn't like to eat cheese and things because they reminded her of how she used to be ill after eating them.

bellavitalikesthesimnellife Thu 09-Apr-09 00:36:38

stripeyknickers - I always use stork for my cakes - it makes fab cakes but would always use butter for butter icing.

cat64 Thu 09-Apr-09 01:08:47

Of course you can use marg for butter icing. If you're not keen on the taste, then make it coffee butter icing, or chocolate butter icing, or put some vanilla or other flavouring / essence in there!!

Steamrunner Thu 09-Apr-09 15:12:34

I personly LURVE butte creame maid with margrine for the taste off it.
To the person who said they woulnt use stork to shine they shoes: THATS CAU'SE ITS NOT SHOE POLIS ITS MARGRINE!!!!.

Ah, now I only do chocolate butter icing so that maybe explains why I've never had a problem with the taste.

PeachyWithTheBirthdayBas Thu 09-Apr-09 18:11:49

PMSL at steam

I hopwever have used it in the past but altho ok its not as good (bt no worse than any other commercially produced butter icing tbh)

I personally choose to use goats butter in this- gets over the dairy wary thing at least (mine cant eat butter though, unless goats milk)

cakedecorator Mon 03-Aug-09 22:15:41

I completely agree,
Buttercream, has to have butter in it!
You need to use a good quality butter like kerrygold, or country life,
the recipe I use is one pack of butter and double the amount of icing sugar, with a drop of boiled cooled water from the kettle.
I beat this, the longer it's beaten the whiter it goes - not on a fast setting though, or else it will go runny!

The legal commercial limit is 25% butter to icing sugar, to be called buttercream, so it depends how rich you want the buttercream to be.

Stork is marg' and doesn't have the right fat content to make buttercream.
Hope this helps



www.cake-links.com

Girlhyde Sun 01-Apr-12 21:02:52

I have used stork in butter icing and in cakes and have been told they are the nicest cakes, stork makes lighter cakes, if you make the cake mixture using both an then do a taste test you will taste the difference and feel a lighter texture with stork and be surprised. I was.

Bunbaker Wed 04-Apr-12 19:42:09

"Is it better with normal butter"

I'm sorry, but you win the prize for the stupidest question I have ever seen on mumsnet. The clue is in the name - buttercream icing. It absolutely has to be made with butter. If you don't like butter make glace icing instead. I once took a bite out of a cupcake that had what looked like buttercream on it, but it was made with margarine. It was all I could do not spit it out.

There are only two reasons why anyone would use margarine - people who are dairy intolerant or being cheapskate.

I do use Stork for baking, but never, ever in icing.

PrisonerOfWaugh Wed 04-Apr-12 19:46:51

I have used the block Stork for butter icing when making dairy free cakes. It isn't as good as real butter, but it is an acceptable substitute. And when you serve it up to a child who has a dairy intolerance and they are told they can actually eat some birthday cake for a change, then it is all worth it.

I do use a bit extra sugar though to improve the taste.

Underconstruction Thu 05-Apr-12 00:16:06

No!

No. Bleugh. There are far better alternatives for dairy free icing.

HoneyBunnyDragon Thu 05-Apr-12 00:41:27

Eeeeeeeeek zombie thread attack
<knew I had weird de ja vu sensation reading op>>

Stork is revolting.
<gavel>

Columbia999 Thu 05-Apr-12 00:58:36

Oh dear, I use Stork for cakes and the toppings on them. Nobody has ever complained, and the cakes usually get scoffed pretty quickly. I didn't know it was revolting! blush

ChippyMinton Thu 05-Apr-12 09:49:34

stork for baking (it's the secret for light fluffy victoria sponge wink
unsalted butter for icing.

Bunbaker Thu 05-Apr-12 18:03:40

No-oo. Salted butter for icing. Unsalted gives a too sickly result (a tip I picked up from here)

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