Alert the media, I am going to bake a cake ...

(22 Posts)
bibbitybobbityhat Sun 09-Jan-11 16:49:54

I can't remember the last time I made a cake.
Possibly in the late 1980s.

Anyways, I have a tremendous urge to make a pineapple upside down cake, the kind where you start off by warming unsalted butter and brown sugar in the bottom of the tin before putting in the pineapple and cherries (yes, I'm going to have the cherries), then the cake mixture.

So, my questions is, cake-makers, can I use a loose bottomed cake tin for that or do you think all my lovely sugary buttery sludge will leak out of the bottom?

Tia

Ooopsadaisy Sun 09-Jan-11 16:54:31

I admire your ambition bibbity.

I am absolutely crap at making cakes.

Biscuits - yes. Mince pies - yes. Cakes - oh no Mr Monkey - not in this house.

I have a wonderful friend who is a Nigella/Delia/Jamie type person and makes my Christmas cake each year. I sort of love her.

Have no advice to offer - just support for your efforts.

Let us know the results.

bibbitybobbityhat Sun 09-Jan-11 17:00:27

grin

Its not going to happen unless some kindly Mumsnetter comes along and tells me it will be ok.

My poor poor wee children, think of them looking up at me with their huuuuuuuuuuge eyes, all sad cos I promised them a pineapple upside down cake but couldn't deliver.

purpleturtle Sun 09-Jan-11 17:02:06

Do you have any greaseproof paper? You could line the tin to minimise leakage.

SecretNutellaFix Sun 09-Jan-11 17:04:19

Alternatively just do the butterscotch sauce seperatley and pour it over the cake when it's turned out to cool

Hassled Sun 09-Jan-11 17:04:27

You could use a loose bottomed tin but it would be better/safer not to. There is definately a seepage risk. If you construct something complicated out of baking parchment/greaseproof paper you might get away with it.

Did you do Pineapple Upside Down cake at school Home Economics? That's where I learnt it. That and Rough Puff Pastry.

mychildrenarebarmy Sun 09-Jan-11 17:07:36

There is quite a high chance of the lovely, yummy, sugary, sauciness leaking.

bibbitybobbityhat Sun 09-Jan-11 17:07:52

Hassled - I think I had a recipe for it in a children's cookbook. I can picture the illustration (b & w line drawing) even now.

Oh, yes, rough puff pastry in school home economics. We used ours to make a sausage plait!

BluTac Sun 09-Jan-11 17:09:38

Aren't you meant to do it in one of those ring tins?

bibbitybobbityhat Sun 09-Jan-11 17:10:24

Ring tin??? Oh good gawd.

Ooopsadaisy Sun 09-Jan-11 17:15:17

Ring tin? Is that a sort of S&M garment?

bibbitybobbityhat Sun 09-Jan-11 17:16:54

I don't think I am singing from the same hymn sheet as anyone who uses a ring tin.

purpleturtle Sun 09-Jan-11 17:19:47

Do you have any options other than loose-bottomed tins?

Hassled Sun 09-Jan-11 17:22:07

The ones in the 70s weren't in a ring, so fret not. Rings are unnecessary frills.

Generally, cake pans/tins are not designed to go on the hob where you may choose to melt your butter and sugar as they are too thin. It is best to use a roasting dish or Tarte Tatin dish, which will be much thicker material. You can make your cake in it too.

BluTac Mon 10-Jan-11 12:29:56

Never google ring tin!

Slubberdegullion Mon 10-Jan-11 13:29:58

Just do it bibbity. Live on the edge, a bit of sludge leakage isn't going to be the end of the world.

If it were me I'd do all the melting bit in a saucepan and then shove it in the pan and see how you get on.

Do not become paralysed with fear at ring tin talk, just crack on and make the bugger.

Ooopsadaisy Tue 11-Jan-11 12:02:41

bibbity - I am curious to know how you got on.

I am also baking my first cake since the industrial revolution - inspired by you.

I am making an (easy) chocolate cake.

I will not be using a ring tin as I have severe doubts that they are legal anywhere but Amsterdam or Bangkok. (No offense to anyone from either place).

Have checked the neighbours are out and have opened all windows and doors. Removed smoke alarm. Wine is open for courage. Wearing lucky pants.

Have alerted the fire brigade and air ambulance. Local hospital on standby to admit emergencies ........

PocketMouse Fri 14-Jan-11 15:24:13

wtf is a ring tin?!

manicmij Fri 14-Jan-11 18:22:29

Congrats on thinking about baking after all this while. Are you sure it is a cake and not a pudding! that's what I have always thought a pineapple upside down thingy was. Wouldn't recommend a loose bottom tin, your lovely syrup will just drip through unless you line the whole tin with foil first.

Definitely go for the cherries, gives it a very luxurious and "ain't you clever" look. Good luck.

Conserve Fri 14-Jan-11 18:26:03

Ring Tin is a Ring Mould. It makes a cake which has no centre. (think Polo mint). It really shows off the pineapples and you can fill the centre with yummy stuff. Popular in 1980's

Conserve Fri 14-Jan-11 18:33:59

oops bibbity - just noticed it was the 80's when youlast made your cake. Just make the butter and sugar in a saucepan first and use greaseproof paper to come up the sides of the tin about 2". It will be lovely, I'm sure.

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