Help! Old guy across road with Parkinsons still driving but badly...

(7 Posts)
myBOYSareBONKERS Sun 23-Dec-12 11:44:40

What was the outcome?

CogPsych Thu 02-Aug-12 00:57:49

Whilst having Parkinsons doesn't bar someone from having a driver's licence, you can report him to the DVLA's Drivers Medical Group anonymously and they will investigate his health and revoke his licence if necessary.

Write to:

Drivers Medical Group
DVLA
Swansea
SA99 1TU

Include his name, address & postcode, and date of birth if you know it. You'll need to include your own name and how you know him, but they will not tell him or anyone else.

Their investigation will begin by writing to him and having him fill out a form (he will lose his licence anyway if he does not respond), then they will write to his GP or consultant to get their opinion on it, and then they will possibly send him for a driving assessment.

jonesio Thu 21-Jul-11 15:01:18

Hmmm wrestled with my conscience some more, especially after reading another thread in AIBU.

Today saw some pretty bad driving again (he also had a CT scan last week - telling me his consultant was 'concerned' about progression of his disease.)

So bit the bullet and rang docs. Receptionist passed a note on to the doctor - who may or may not be calling back, apparently. (patient confidentiality etc)

She took down all the info I gave her, so, we'll see. Thanks for your help.

What happened in the end?

jonesio Wed 22-Jun-11 15:09:33

Hi Joruth. Thanks so much. Didn't think of option 2. I know he goes to same GP as have seen him in waiting room lots of times. Talking to them may well make me feel guilty for 'snitching' but I do worry more about his and others' safety.

joruth Wed 22-Jun-11 14:01:33

uuh ohh... As some one with a chronic progressive illness his GP should have assessed his ability to drive...but s/he may not have seen him for a while or might have told him not to but he still is.
I am a doctor and there is no doubt in my mind that you have to do something...
2 choices 1) be upfront and risk your relationship and the possibility of helping him later on or 2) be less upfront and ask his carers to write down concerns and report to GP. I prefer 2 because it comes from the professional carers who should be assessing him as they assist him and it keeps you out of the loop. If the district nurse is someone who visits occasionally s/he would be a good option too. If you know which GP he attends you could post a note to them to follow up. Sounds terrible but he won't be living independently for long if he has an accident and I am sure he wouldn't want to harm anyone else. If he has been told not to drive then his insurance is invalid and he is legally obliged to inform the DVLA.

Good luck with this and well done for not just standing by and hoping for the best

jonesio Wed 22-Jun-11 13:00:17

Never posted before but here goes. Not sure if / what to do. Lots of info for context so please bear with me. Old guy (75) directly across road. Street has no off-street parking, and is terraced.

He lives alone and has one friend who visits him every day, they go out in friend's car. Often have pub lunch together (have seen this neighbour drinking at lunch, which also raises a drink-drive question?) Carers call once or twice a week. We keep an eye out , not much, but chat, offer to shop for him (he never accepts). He has had a few falls but doesn't have a button thingy. He seems to live quite well independently given circumstances.

The problem is that he still drives, and badly. Slow, weaving, straight over zebra crossings...When he parks, even in double length spaces, he often repeatedly hits cars both to front and rear, and appears not to notice. Last week we were watching tv and heard a massive bang, it was him doing this. So whilst it's great he's living independently - and I wouldn't want this to be taken away - I'm worried about the implications for children who get in his way, and there are lots nearby including DS 8m and DD 3.5y. (Any car damage is immaterial to me really).

What, if anything, should we do?

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