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Negotiating salary ...

(7 Posts)
Poppy67 Tue 21-Jan-14 19:00:11

Got a job offer but money is crap. Ad said £AA to ZZ. I have been put on bottom of scale, AA, yet am way over qualified for the role. Any tips of how to securing a higher salary?

bevelino Tue 21-Jan-14 21:26:16

Point out your value and what you can bring to the role and negotiate a higher salary. I recruit people and have great admiration for people who ask for more money, especially women. Provided you conduct yourself in a professional manner the absolute worst than can happen is that they say no. You have nothing to lose so go for it.

justdrankacappuccino Tue 21-Jan-14 22:12:46

Definitely negotiate then relax and sit back.

I'm always mindful that employers normally offer bottom to mid when they offer a range. I think they do it to lure better candidates in. It's rubbish though and really annoys me.

SnowBells Tue 21-Jan-14 23:15:12

Did you get it via a recruitment agent??

Typically, the recruitment agent negotiates more - last time, mine got me the top of the scape published...

EBearhug Tue 21-Jan-14 23:21:19

I was once offered a role which I wasn't actually that keen on, and when they offered it, I said it wasn't enough to make up for the extra costs in travel, plus it was more responsibility than my current role and I said I wouldn't consider it for a figure that was 25% more than I was being paid in my current role.

And instead of pricing me out of the running as I expected, they went off to HR to see if they could get it signed off, which was an important lesson to me. I still didn't take the job, because it wasn't really about the money, but if I'd actually wanted it, there's no way I'd have risked negotiating something that much higher.

They've already offered you the job, so you're in a strong position. Point out what you will be bringing to the role. It also helps if you know the market rates for the role. Also, some industries expect you to negotiate, so they start by offering a lower rate than they're prepared to offer.

Poppy67 Wed 22-Jan-14 10:52:54

Thanks. Just called, clarified I was speaking to the relevant person, built up courage to make the ask, only to be told she is not the right person .... aaarrggghhh!

Teatimetinny Wed 22-Jan-14 12:22:04

Good luck! I'd recommend doing a practice negotiation with someone first if you can. Specifically work out what you'll say if they say no. Don't just say oh well never mind, but see it as the next step in the negotiation. Maybe ask for some other perk or a smaller increase.

I find I build up all the courage to ask then don't see it through properly. I've been in this situation twice and each time the recruitment consultant has asked 'is this a deal breaker' and each time I've said no, and I haven't been given what I've asked for.

I agree with the poster who said they will respect you more for asking - they definitely will want someone assertive who knows her own worth - go for it!

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