How can I ensure that this does not deter future employers...

(9 Posts)
mammasmadhouse Thu 16-Jan-14 18:53:03

Ok here goes, I have been in my current job for just under 5 months but I am finding it really hard to settle. It is a totally new area, so whilst I have learnt lots I have also learnt that my boss is quite inconsistent (I am the 4th administrator in as many years) I work on my own and feel very isolated. I am used to fitting straight in and knowing what to do and what's coming and having never worked in this area before feel that my confidence is being crushed.
The job I did prior to this I was in for 5 months also but left to take my current role as it was FT and as a PA I had no boss to look after, recruitment was and is on-going. Prior to these posts I worked in finance admin for 3 years and then 13 years NHS admin, so my past is not overly flaky.
I have seen a post advertised which is very appealing but how do I explain wanting to move again after such a short space of time...? hmm

2014ThisIsMyYear Thu 16-Jan-14 20:25:09

I'd say that after 5 months you've given it a fair go. Sometimes the reality is different from what was advertised, and that's not your fault. It happened to a friend of mine.

You could explain it away by saying a reorganisation took place / didn't take place, or the company refocussed and the role changed, for example, and although they don't want you to leave, it's not the job you expected. You can gloss over the finer points if challenged in an interview. It's OK to be economical with the truth but make sure you sound convincing.

Avoid appearing to blame your current boss though - that will deter a future employer!

Toklastennis Thu 16-Jan-14 20:27:18

Is the attractive job in a different area, or one of your old areas? I roils be honest with a positive spin, and say that you realised that the new field of work didn't suit you as much as what you were doing before, that you lived x,y and z about your old role and think you round excel at the new post for all the same reasons. Also emphasize that you have a good working relationship with your current boss and he or she will give you a good reference. Basically, concentrate on the positives of the job you're applying for, not the negatives of the one you're leaving.

Toklastennis Thu 16-Jan-14 20:27:22

Is the attractive job in a different area, or one of your old areas? I roils be honest with a positive spin, and say that you realised that the new field of work didn't suit you as much as what you were doing before, that you lived x,y and z about your old role and think you round excel at the new post for all the same reasons. Also emphasize that you have a good working relationship with your current boss and he or she will give you a good reference. Basically, concentrate on the positives of the job you're applying for, not the negatives of the one you're leaving.

Toklastennis Thu 16-Jan-14 20:29:01

Aargh sorry for errors and double posting - new phone

Jossysgiants Fri 17-Jan-14 18:23:21

I quit a job after 5 months a few years ago. I was worried too about the impact on my Cv but I had no trouble getting another, better paid job. I think everyone is allowed one of these kind of situations. I would just refer to the context of your Cv- assuming you have remained in jobs for a reasonable time previously. I don't think there is anything wrong with saying it wasn't a fit and this new prospective job is much more up your street.

mammasmadhouse Sun 19-Jan-14 10:05:14

Thank you for replies, I am currently looking at an application form which asks : Why do you wish to leave?, what is the best way of explaining this ....?

LondonMother Sun 19-Jan-14 10:09:29

New job is a better match for your skills/offers more opportunities for career progression/in a sector which you find more appealing than the one you're currently in/would give you an opportunity to learn more about a new sector - you get the idea. I think you just have to be plausible and bear in mind that if your current boss does a reference you don't want that to contradict anything you've said in the application/interview, e.g. that there's a re-organisation in prospect if there isn't.

justdrankacappuccino Sun 19-Jan-14 13:25:29

I've had this problem several times. People's idea of a PA varies dramatically. It should be to look after one person, manage their time, foreseeing problems and being proactive. More often than not it is the complete opposite, reacting to everything and being everyone's general dogsbody because it is impossible to anticipate anything. It's a horrible way to work.

Write a positive story about what has happened, rehearse it and start applying for others jobs. There is no point in staying a rubbish job.

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