Would you apply for a job if you have all the skills they want but?

(18 Posts)
Crutchlow35 Thu 28-Nov-13 19:25:59

Not the education? There is a job with a local childrens hospice. I think I could be very good at it (per the description) but I don't have anything close to the education requirements they want.

I am 45 and have a proven track record in the role.

tweetytwat Thu 28-Nov-13 19:26:46

Absolutely yes.

Rosencrantz Thu 28-Nov-13 19:27:12

Yes, worse they can say is no.

Worth the shot.

hermioneweasley Thu 28-Nov-13 19:27:31

Definitely, they can only say no.

Jbck Thu 28-Nov-13 19:29:38

If you have the experience and can prove that then absolutely.

Good luck!

MrGeresHamster Thu 28-Nov-13 19:30:22

Yes!

OverlyMe Thu 28-Nov-13 19:30:34

It would depend how long the application form would take to fill in and what other times pressures I had. If I had nothing to lose, then yes.

TheDoctrineOfWho Thu 28-Nov-13 19:30:55

Yes.

I've read that typically , men apply for jobs if they meet 60% if the criteria; women when it's 100%.

Good luck!

Crutchlow35 Thu 28-Nov-13 19:32:35

Thanks. I think I will try. Would you highlight it in the covering letter? Something like I appreciate I do not have the education requirements you seek however, I hope that the work experience detailed on my CV will show my excellent skills and lead to an interview - or something like that?

Thanks all for your quick responses.

wordyBird Thu 28-Nov-13 19:46:34

Yes! Do apply.

I'd emphasise your selling points in the covering letter. So imagine you're selling a product (you).... tell them what you can do and and how well. Tell them about your excellent skills, but don't hint at the missing requirements...just tell them how good you are. Get them intrigued. If they want to enquire about educational requirements, they can ask at the interview. smile

TheDoctrineOfWho Thu 28-Nov-13 19:47:54

I would at least allude to it so they know you read it - any training you've had could be in this bit.

wordyBird Thu 28-Nov-13 19:48:08

On anecdotal evidence (ie my experience), I'm convinced you're right about that statistic, Doctrine...

oddslippers Thu 28-Nov-13 19:50:15

Are you able to phone someone for a chat about the role and sell yourself on the call letting your enthusiasm shine through

wordyBird Thu 28-Nov-13 19:53:13

Great idea oddslippers
This is something I've done

Wesdly Thu 28-Nov-13 19:53:46

I applied for a job where I didn't meet the education requirements and they have offered me an interview next week so it is possible. I only have four years experience too so not a huge amount.
I had nothing to lose by applying and even if I don't get the job I am quite looking forward the interview experience.

OneHandFlapping Thu 28-Nov-13 19:56:37

I wouldn't allude to it at all.

I'd spend some time making sure that examples in my CV addressed all the qualities and experience they highlighted in the advert.

At the very back, very unobtrusively, I'd put whatever educational/professional qualifications I had.

I'd write a covering letter highlighting a couple of salient points from my CV.

And send it!

Employers often cut their suits according to their cloth when they see the CVs coming in, so it's ALWAYS worth a shot.

EBearhug Thu 28-Nov-13 21:31:44

Do a functional CV, so you focus on your skills and experience, rather than a traditional, time-linear CV, and in the covering letter, emphasise examples of where your experience fit their requirements.

There are lots of examples of functional CVs online, if you google.

lovesmileandlaugh Thu 28-Nov-13 21:35:14

I think it depends on what they are asking for. For example, if they say you have to be a qualified nurse, you might not be able to get past that (although I always think it is worth ringing and asking). If they want 'degree-level education', you need to demonstrate how you have worked at that level in other posts.

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