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Redundancy appeal

(7 Posts)
17leftfeet Sun 24-Nov-13 19:23:52

When you appeal against redundancy and you submit the letter for the appeal, is it just bullet points headlining why I'm appealing and then I present evidence at the appeal hearing, or do I need to include some evidence in the initial letter?

flowery Mon 25-Nov-13 06:26:52

I would suggest including it. That will give them time to consider/prepare a response whereas if they only see your evidence at the hearing it's much more likely the hearing will have to be adjourned, dragging the whole thing out.

For example if your grounds are that reasonable procedure wasn't followed, you should set out what was wrong with the procedure in the letter. If you don't tell them until the hearing that x manager didn't do x, they've then got to check.

17leftfeet Mon 25-Nov-13 09:23:34

Thanks flowery, not the response I was hoping for as I've only got 3 days to do it

Do I need to send my documentation supporting my appeal (there is lots) or take that to the appeal hearing -I presume they have to hear the appeal?

PenguinsDontEatPancakes Mon 25-Nov-13 09:27:15

What sort of documentation is it? It's rare that lots of documentation is relevant - if by lots you mean files and files of stuff. There are situations where it will be (maybe if you think lots of emails show a history of bullying by a manager who did the redundancy scoring), but I'd take a really critical look at the documents for relevance as a first step. As Flowery said, masses and masses will just slow things down. And if you are referring to masses of documents in the meeting that they haven't seen before, they'll probably have to adjorn as they wont' be able to follow what you are talking about.

If it's a bundle that will fit in an A4 envelope, I'd try and drop it in beforehand as it will make for a more engaged and productive meeting and reduce the chances of needing a second.

17leftfeet Mon 25-Nov-13 09:51:32

It's not masses but I've recently had a new manager as my last one retired

He didn't review my file prior to writing the assessment so has based it on 6 weeks of working with me and without looking at my end of year review which was done in may

Much if what he says directly contradicts evidence that I hold eg he says I don't carry out reviews with my team and I can evidence that I do and I do it consistently

PenguinsDontEatPancakes Mon 25-Nov-13 10:19:35

If it stuff they should easily be able to locate copies of - eg you have a file of staff reviews - you can always explain what it is, the relevance and where to find it instead of sending copies. That might be easier.

flowery Mon 25-Nov-13 14:20:44

I wouldn't give them masses of documents if not absolutely necessary.

If you are disputing the scoring you've been given against selection criteria I would suggest listing the specific criteria you feel have been rated inaccurately and explain why, in as concise a manner as possible, giving supporting evidence where necessary.

Your previous performance review/s will be relevant, but for something like carrying out reviews of the team, I wouldn't include all the actual reviews. Presumably they have them on file anyway. I would just say that (for example) between x date and x date you conducted reviews with all your team, or whatever.

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