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Applying for job - at what stage should I discuss hours?

(23 Posts)
daimbardiva Mon 19-Aug-13 12:40:32

End of story - after all that, I didn't get it!! At least I know it wasn't because I wanted to work part-time, as I didn't mention it! Really disappointed, but onwards and upwards as they say...

daimbardiva Sat 10-Aug-13 14:24:18

So I've had the interview...it was tough, but I think it went OK. I managed to get some insider info from an HR person at the company who said to wait until you're offered it before discussing hours/salary etc., so that's what I've done....fingers crossed!

daimbardiva Tue 23-Jul-13 09:59:39

Congrats incywincy - really pleased to hear that approach worked out for you, it does sound logical. Without wanting to blow my own trumpet, I do actually believe I'm the right person for this job, so hopefully I will be able to do something similar.

I will let you all know how things go!

incywincyspideragain Sun 21-Jul-13 21:47:34

just seen your post - fwiw I applied for a full time job and had coaching not to say anything about wanting it part time, I was advised to go for interview, for them to meet me and decided if I was qualified for the job, the job interview is also as much about you deciding you like them as they like you. After you have a job offer then arrange to go back (almost immediately - and face to face if possible) to discuss hours and money.

I did this, it worked for me (bear in mind that HR said I couldn't have a part time contract but the interviewing manager fought to make it happen - I'd be concerned that HR would make a decision on hours without assessing you as a candidate)

I got a 'full time' job on 29 hrs (in 4 days) in November - I just got a pay rise and a bonus - its a male dominated professional industry, I don't think I'm awesome but I'm obviously the right person to do that job in 29 hrs grin

Good luck whatever you decide to do!

CajaDeLaMemoria Wed 17-Jul-13 17:42:25

I think the key point will be if you will take a reduced pay for the part time. Like Wet Grass said, they might be willing to split it between you and an assistant, but the wage is likely to be split too.

Good luck st interview, and let us know! I'll cross my fingers.

aftermay Wed 17-Jul-13 17:36:56

Exciting. Good luck. I went for a PT job yesterday but they asked me if I'd consider more than that. Which I hadn't and kind of put me on the spot.

aftermay Wed 17-Jul-13 17:35:36

Excit

daimbardiva Wed 17-Jul-13 13:38:43

Thanks all. Great to hear lots of different perspectives.

I've just heard that I have been asked to interview (wahey/eek) , so will now need to decide what to do!

Heartening to hear your views, wetgrass - it does sometimes seem that options are so limited for part-time work. I don't want to be part-time forever, but as a family it doesn't make sense for us both to work FT atm, but at the same time I've worked very hard to get where I am career-wise and don't want to let that slide..

WetGrass Wed 17-Jul-13 12:49:27

Why is everyone being so hmm to the OP?

Every every job can be carved up into a reduced workload - its just a question of whether it is worth the (perceived or actual ) disruption for the employer.

For example - split the wage between OP and an assistant /admin support person - or bring in a junior on some of the workload.

Most people are looking for a full time role - so from the employers pov - it makes sense to advertise a full time role. This doesnt indIcate that they've considered & ruled out a part time working pattern.

BobbinUp Wed 17-Jul-13 12:38:30

I have applied for two FT jobs recently and discussed my need for compressed hours at the very outset via phone. Both times this has been accepted very positively. I currently do a four day week in private sector with a commute so believe I can manage a fixed 37 week (jobs were public sector) and have the skills to do so. I dont want to go down the road of misleading that I am looking to work 5 days when I am not. I also think that if its going to be a problem I would rather flag it early as I couldnt work for an inflexible organisation at present with my committments at home! I have been lucky that my current employer is "blue chip" so I am attractive at first sift due to my place there. Like you OP roles arent advertised in my business as PT and if you dont ask you won't know...

aftermay Wed 17-Jul-13 12:32:22

I don't think the fact you're overqualified matters too much to them. It's a different role and that's why they're paying less. I think it's a bit presumptuous to say you could do it in 3 days. Good luck, though. I'd go but make it clear that you would prefer part-time, then negotiate from there.

aftermay Wed 17-Jul-13 12:30:13

I dThe fact you're overqualified

If you do compressed hours, can't your DH/DP do drop and pick up so not much increase in childcare which is offset by no cut in salary? Or work from home one day to save travel time?

KnackeredCow Wed 17-Jul-13 10:58:01

Why not phone them to discuss? I'd still interview a candidate who wanted to do a role p/t as they might be the best person for the job.

Your other option could be to start the role on a f/t basis and then make a flexible working request once you've been there for 26 consecutive weeks. This would be if they won't initially allow p/t. Flexible working requests can be rejected though.

flowery Wed 17-Jul-13 10:55:59

If it's not a dealbreaker for you, and/or you are prepared to do compressed hours or only a slight reduction, then wait until offer or at least final interview/it's looking very positive stage.

If you want a significant reduction (as you do) and/or it's a dealbreaker and you wouldn't accept the job on any other basis, mention it early so that if it's not a possibility, no one wastes their time.

daimbardiva Wed 17-Jul-13 10:47:25

Thanks for your thoughts.

Compressed hours are an option - and one that I know this organisation does do. However, it's not really part time - it would still cost me more in childcare. The reasons I think I might be in with a chance of negotiating hours down, are a_) the post is being readvertised after they failed to find someone last time b) I am over-qualified and more experienced than the post demands, so I do genuinely believe I could get more done in a shorter time...

I will add - that's how one person I know got "part time". They asked once they'd been offered the job.

Could you do compressed hours? Four long days equiv to five then negotiate down once established?

daimbardiva Tue 16-Jul-13 16:58:37

I'm thinking 3 days - the role would be a drop in salary compared ot my current job and I really can't afford to work more for less money.

Snowgirl1 Tue 16-Jul-13 16:52:28

How part-time are you thinking? If I had a full-time role to recruit for and someone claimed they could do the full-time role in 3 days I'd be a bit dubious. Could you suggest that it's done on a job share basis?

If invited to interview I'd ask how many interview stages there will be - if only one, then you probably want to raise it in the first interview. If two or three, then I'd raise it in one of the later ones.

daimbardiva Tue 16-Jul-13 16:46:43

I know it's a long shot, but the thing is in my field posts are almost never advertised part-time. I will be stuck in my present job for life if I don't try to negotiate...

Dackyduddles Tue 16-Jul-13 16:10:46

If they want full they want full. I'm guessing if they had a known candidate to do the job pt the wouldn't be looking for a stranger externally ft.

Don't ask, don't get but I really wouldn't put hopes on it. Nice if it does come off tho. Good luck

daimbardiva Tue 16-Jul-13 16:07:03

I have applied for a job for which I'm well qualified, and am a good candidate for. I expect to get an interview (will be gutted if I don't even get to that stage!). It is a full time job, but I would want to work full time - at what stage should I mention this? At the interview, or if/when they offer me the job? I don't want to lead them on, but at the same time I don't want to rule myself out by mentioning it too early. I am confident that I could do the job part-time as a) I'm more experienced than the job spec demands and b) I have effectively been doing a full-time job part-time for the last 3 years anyway.

All opinions welcome, thank you!

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