Mumsnet has not checked the qualifications, experience, or professional insurance of anyone posting on Mumsnet and cannot be held responsible for any advice given on the site. If you have an employment dispute and need professional advice, please contact your union, the Citizen's Advice Bureau or a solicitor.

Should I go on pregnancy related sick leave?

(13 Posts)
HoleyGhost Thu 11-Jul-13 09:45:10

I am having a complicated pregnancy and my consultant has stated that if I wanted to be signed off work that would be reasonable.

I love my work so said that I would prefer not to be signed off, but discussed the issues with my line manager, explaining that I could not realistically work long hours but should be fine to work full time.

Since then, for the first time, he is being publicly critical of my work. My workload is more intense than ever and I feel that I am letting colleagues down.

I am now feeling stressed and thinking that being signed off for the pregnancy complications might be a better idea. This feels disloyal to my team who would really struggle to meet major deadlines.

I normally have an excellent working relationship with my manager. I do not want to jeopardise it and am unsure whether taking sick leave or working to rule is more likely to do that.

flowery Thu 11-Jul-13 09:49:59

I think a complicated pregnancy is the time to do whatever is the best thing for you and the baby, and not worry too much about upsetting anyone else tbh. You're going to be going off on maternity leave soon anyway.

How pregnant are you? Are we talking signed off for the rest of your pregnancy?

HoleyGhost Thu 11-Jul-13 10:01:41

Thank you flowery, I am only 14 weeks - that is why I would prefer not to be signed off.

The complication is chorionic haemorrhage which might resolve itself or might not. The bleeding has left me weak and tired but the foetus seems to be doing well so far.

I just can't manage to do the extra couple of hours sometimes needed to finish things off. I have to apologise for the delays too often and it is stressful.

HoleyGhost Thu 11-Jul-13 10:02:54

The consultant did not say anything about how long I would be signed off for.

patchesmcp Thu 11-Jul-13 10:12:22

Holey when I was signed off work it was for a few weeks at a time. Why not ask the consultant to give you a sick note for 2 weeks initially and then review things?

The 2 weeks will give you time to relax a bit and you may feel more able to work after that. The alternative is the consultant could specify you are fit for work on certain provisos I think, such as you don't work over x number of hours. That's what my GP told me was another possibility when I was reluctant for him to sign me off work.

HoleyGhost Thu 11-Jul-13 10:31:52

Patches, that is a good idea. Will see how today goes and then decide what to do.

lymeregis Fri 12-Jul-13 12:17:34

If you have to go off sick because of pregnancy related sickness your employer must not treat you unfavourably because of it - it is unlawful to do so.
Sounds like you should get signed off.

missingmumxox Sat 13-Jul-13 02:41:48

I nearly always defer to the Midwife or consultant of the lady, this is because there are too many unknowns with pregnancy and other thing which affect the pregnant woman.

for instance you are 14 weeks a lot of women feel like pants still at this stage, weak, sick, tired, all normal, but add blood loss and the obvious worry you will have, would compound this, and therefore it would be no wonder that you might not being preforming at your normal level.

The best way for you by the sounds of it would be to be signed off as others have said and hopefully get back in a few weeks back to your fighting weight.

from your employers point of view they sometime lose sign of your problem and only see the work to be done, I find when someone goes off in most cases the manager is fully supportive, but worried about the workload (as in it is their problem and they realise this, I only get the odd fuck wit who has no sympathy) those who have no sympathy tend not to have a relationship with the employee before hand.

within days they are cool with it if they know you are off and they reallocate, dump work and prioritise, what tends to make them wobble most is not knowing if someone will be in today or tomorrow, or leave before that important meeting on Tuesday.

If you have an OH get a referral, but in the first instance go off sick Baby V work, no contest, if things improve maybe back to work full time again, or even part time on a phased or temp adaptation, depending on how things pan out, being off sick is boring sad

HoleyGhost Sat 13-Jul-13 12:01:45

Thank you all for the advice. I discussed the situation with my manager again yesterday, he was much more sympathetic and supportive. We have worked out how my work could be managed if I do need to go on sick leave. I have also arranged to meet our HR rep early next week and will ask her advice re occupational health.

We have some important meetings next week. I intend to be there (unless bleeding becomes much worse or I lose the baby). If I am still struggling after that, and the bleeding is still heavy, I will get myself signed off.

AnythingNotEverything Sat 13-Jul-13 12:12:26

Signing off sick might be the right thing to do - talk to your midwife, and also your manager about making the most of the time you have before mat leave.

If you want something less nuclear, could you use some annual leave to do a shorter week? Or could you temporaily reduce your working hours? (you have to be careful how this is phrased as it can affect your mat pay if not done correctly)

Lots of women still feel rubbish at 14 weeks, regardless of other complications, and you may feel like a different woman in a couple of weeks.

I'm 26 weeks now and am just taking every week as it comes - some weeks are harder than others.

Best of luck - hope you keep well.

Dackyduddles Sat 13-Jul-13 12:17:16

From experience once pregnant worry about you only as every firm will just go ahead and worry about themselves only not caring one jot for you.

Bitter a bit perhaps. It's also true.

SkinnyDecaffGiraffe Sat 13-Jul-13 12:20:43

I would say it depends how you feel, whether your performance will be impaired due to the complications and also related to that whether you will be assessed for said performance.

I worked thru some shocking SPD which meant pain and also exhaustion as I wasn't sleeping.

Boss refused to discuss it with me (ignored me when I spoke of it) and put on a ton more work and pressure.

Being quite devoted to my job I tried hard and basically didnt do well enough and got shafted on my performance review. I wish I'd got signed off sick at the appropriate time.

All that stress, pain and crap from the boss when I could have been signed off watching the Olympics from my birthing ball! I now have to return to work with less good review and work it back up again.

Moral of this - don't hesitate to get signed off if its necessary !

HoleyGhost Sat 13-Jul-13 12:35:07

My performance is affected, especially as I have reduced my hours (still over the 37 required but am doing less than my colleagues now).

This has been food for thought - my being on sick leave would make things easier in some ways for my manager as there would be less uncertainty...

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now