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Turning down relocation - what to expect

(6 Posts)
sugarspunsister00 Wed 01-May-13 21:23:32

My team is being relocated from the north west to London and I'm unable to relocate. I've been offered to apply for another role within the team, based at my current office, but it's not one I'm interested in. So my only choice is to leave.

My contract says I have, and they have to give, 3 months notice. I've been with the business for almost 7 years. My director thanked me today for my professionalism since breaking the news and assured me of glowing references for my 'flawless' work in the role.

I have a meeting next week with my director and HR where I assume I'll be offered a package. I'm still shell shocked from hearing the news yesterday and so struggling to muster up the confidence I need to stand up for myself in this meeting, very glad it's a long BH weekend! But I'm not sure what I should be asking for or expecting, or what I can demand.

If anyone has any experience in this I'd appreciate hearing what happened and how you handled it.

JiltedJohnsJulie Wed 01-May-13 22:11:49

Just bumping for you.

sugarspunsister00 Thu 02-May-13 06:58:53

Thank you JJJ. Any advice would be appreciated.

2fedup Thu 02-May-13 07:10:05

Sorry this is happening to you, I haven't got any real advice, other than check your company policies before you go to the meeting and see what you think you are entitled too. see if they offer support for job hunting, cv writing, etc otherwise it might be worth asking if they can provide it.

flowery Thu 02-May-13 09:58:43

Well it sounds like your role is legitimately redundant, and you are entitled to turn down the option to relocate that far and not forfeit redundancy entitlement.

However you have also turned down the option of another role, so if that one would be considered a 'suitable alternative' (meaning suitable for your skills and experience and on no less favourable terms and conditions), you may be considered to have resigned rather than been made redundant.

If the role is not a suitable alternative, you'll be entitled to your notice, (which obviously they can ask you to work), plus 7 weeks' pay as statutory redundancy pay, (or more if any of your service was over the age of 41, less if any of your service was under 22). A week's pay is capped at £450, so if you earn more than that per week, you'll get 7x £450. Statutory redundancy pay will be tax free.

All this is on the basis that your employer doesn't operate any kind of enhanced redundancy pay scheme. They may offer you more anyway of course, but the above is what you are entitled to if the other role is not suitable.

sugarspunsister00 Sat 04-May-13 15:25:10

Thank you all so much for your comments. On meeting up with one of my colleagues who is also losing her job we've discussed the option of job sharing the alternative job. If they don't accept that then I guess there will be a package of notice plus goodwill if we're lucky!

Thanks again.

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