Prep school till 13, what next if not staying independent?

(34 Posts)
weepootle Thu 07-Aug-14 23:40:31

My daughter will board until 13 as the family will be mobile until then and that's what she has chosen. By the time she finishes Prep, we will have settled in one place so no need for her to board (couldn't afford for her to either - current perk of job).

I understand Prep school is preparing them for the CE exam and most of the kids from her Prep go on to prestigious schools, however we wouldn't be able to afford an expensive one. Should we be aiming for a local grammar school? Would it be detrimental for her to then join a local high school (even if it's a good one).

weepootle Fri 08-Aug-14 00:12:02

local *state high school

DoristheCamel Fri 08-Aug-14 00:51:50

We have done just this for the same reasons you describe. DD2 has just finished boarding prep and is moving to our local comprehensive in September.

Obviously no idea at the moment how this transition will go yet.

DD1 went onto boarding Independent high school and so far has found that CE has set her in very good stwad gor many of her GCSEs. Wiyh this in mind I don't feel the CE syllabus has been wasted on DD2 but time will tell.

Sorry I cannot be more help.

DoristheCamel Fri 08-Aug-14 00:51:51

We have done just this for the same reasons you describe. DD2 has just finished boarding prep and is moving to our local comprehensive in September.

Obviously no idea at the moment how this transition will go yet.

DD1 went onto boarding Independent high school and so far has found that CE has set her in very good stwad gor many of her GCSEs. Wiyh this in mind I don't feel the CE syllabus has been wasted on DD2 but time will tell.

Sorry I cannot be more help.

soddinghormones Fri 08-Aug-14 06:29:36

There's no reason why it has to be detrimental but depending on the school she may find it a huge culture shock

Do you know what your options would be? Although at 13+ you'll be dependent on which local schools actually have space

happygardening Fri 08-Aug-14 06:42:19

My DS1 moved from his full boarding prep to a state comp at 13 he is dyslexic with a significant processing disorder and can become anxious in new situations and I thought would find it difficult he was absolutely fine. He didn't even find it a culture shock.
I'm glad we waited till 13 because I think he was more mature than he would have been at 11 and thus coped with the move better.

Hakluyt Fri 08-Aug-14 06:47:22

If you are thinking about a grammar school, it's important to remember that they are usually massively oversubscribed, and it's very possible that there wouldn't be an available space in year 9.

weepootle Fri 08-Aug-14 09:42:07

Do most people join grammar schools at 11 then?

Best case scenario is she will do really well when it come to CE and gain a scholarship but obviously can't rely on that.

Hakluyt Fri 08-Aug-14 09:48:11

Yes. State secondary education starts at year 7.

weepootle Fri 08-Aug-14 09:53:17

So grammar is year 7 and independent high schools start at year 9?

Contraryish Fri 08-Aug-14 09:56:33

Many independent school scholarships are now very small. When I grew up, there were 90% scholarships around but the highest I've seen mentioned now (admittedly, without extensive research) is about 30 %. Some are just a token of a couple of hundred pounds!

Hakluyt Fri 08-Aug-14 09:56:44

All state secondary schools start in year 7. So do some private schools. Some private schools start in year 9. I think it's usually the older, more traditional ones that do- but I could be wrong. Someone who knows mor will be along soon.

LIZS Fri 08-Aug-14 09:59:07

Most grammars and state schools do not have an intake at 13 (there are a few exceptions such as Cranbrook and some areas have middle schools which transfer at 12/13). Independent schools can start at 11 or 13 , it will vary. Some may intake at both, although in that case usually 13+ intake is smaller, some only at 13 or only at 11 with spaces fill later by natural turnover. Those that intake at 13+ do not always require CE but may set their own entrance assessments. Where in the country would you be living ?

Hakluyt Fri 08-Aug-14 10:02:01

But it is possible to apply to a state school in any year, and if you fulfil the entry requirements and there's a space, you get in. It's often the space that's the issue.

weepootle Fri 08-Aug-14 11:39:45

LIZS, we have no idea yet where we'd like to settle- possibly South West (salisbury-bath) but we have no ties so can go anywhere.

LIZS Fri 08-Aug-14 11:46:18

How old is she now ? Some independents will be closing their registration lists during Year6/7 and some pretest a year or two before entry for 13+ places. Somerset is a middle school area iirc and have a later secondary transfer. Are you after girls' or coed ? You tend to find independent girls' schools less reliant on CE but also having main intake at 11. Would it be possible for her to board from 11 at a secondary and then go day at same school ?

IndridCold Fri 08-Aug-14 12:03:42

Several children at DS's prep went onto grammar school, but they had to move at 11. The grammar school told them that there was no guarantee of a place at 13, and they would have to start with everyone else at 11 to be sure of a place - subject to them meeting other entry requirements of course.

So if it's grammar school you want you would need to check this out I think, you might be relying on the chance of pupils leaving to get a place later.

Hakluyt Fri 08-Aug-14 12:08:04

And if you want grammar school you need to choose where you want to settle very carefully.

weepootle Fri 08-Aug-14 12:28:19

She's going into year 5. It looks like we'll have to decide on an Independent in an area we can afford to live so that we can send her as a day pupil. She has a scholarship to her prep so I'm sure the headmaster will give us plenty of advice when the time comes.

weepootle Fri 08-Aug-14 12:39:24

LIZS, good point about some counties having 3 tier system- our last home did and had excellent state high schools.

She is definitely a co-ed girl, flatly refused all girls schools. We could move her to a boarding high at 11, looking at the destination schools they go on to from her prep - they're not in exactly affordable areas!

I really hoped to keep her where she is until 13 though for continuity and we love the school.

inthename Fri 08-Aug-14 16:41:40

if shes year 5 now, check pre test dates really carefully, theres a lot of 13 + schools moving to pre test in yr 6 or 7 followed by CE in yr 8.
Have a conversation with your headteacher too because if shes not likely to be gping from the prep to where the school traditonally sends on to you may find yourself doing a lot of leg work yourself.
Financial assistance at senior level tends to be by bursary support rather than just by scholarship, so check all bursary information for any schools you're interested in and how the bursaries are administered, some are attached to 'scholarship' standard being obtained, others purely on means testing the parents.
If you're looking at going back into state for year 9 onwards it would be a case of which schools have space as its classed as an 'in year admission' rather than the traditional year 7 transfer.

trinity0097 Fri 08-Aug-14 21:06:08

Can I recommend the Cheddar area in Somerset, they have a great upper school, Kings of Wessex, starts at 13 (year 9). The surrounding villages that are the catchment area are lovely, e.g. Wedmore.

I used to teach in one of the middle schools that fed into it. I now teach in a Prep school, some kids go onto state schools from us and seem to adjust fine.

PolkadotsAndMoonbeams Fri 08-Aug-14 21:17:02

You could also look at some of the independent schools in the north (Cheshire/South Manchester have a lot) both co-ed and single sex, and I think some are quite a bit cheaper than ones down south. They're academically selective too (some more than others if that's a consideration).

There's also (if you went Trafford way) grammar schools, so you could keep your options open by doing that.

Alternatively, Poole/Broadstone area has middle schools, so lots move at thirteen, or quite a few boarding schools you can go to as day pupils.

Schoolsearchconsultant Sat 09-Aug-14 20:25:43

Message deleted by MNHQ. Here's a link to our Talk Guidelines.

weepootle Sun 10-Aug-14 07:26:15

Trinity, cheddar sounds like a great recommendation, I'll definitely look into that- house prices in the area look good.

Polkadots, Manchester isn't an area I'd consider (come from a similar large city), I'm after somewhere more rural. We're very close to the 2nd area you suggested and much as I love where I am, not keen on Poole (we're 2 tier as different part of county).

Staffordshire would be a consideration as we'll be living there before she finishes prep (I don't know the area yet).

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