Christ's Hospital, Horsham

(112 Posts)
RnB Fri 16-Mar-12 10:58:28

Anyone have any experience of this school?

RnB Fri 16-Mar-12 14:40:46

Bump

happygardening Fri 16-Mar-12 14:58:22

Friends daughter went it was a disaster.

pinkhebe Fri 16-Mar-12 15:00:32

PM'd you

badgerhead Fri 16-Mar-12 16:26:29

Not as a parent or ex pupil, but as a friend of someone who's dd is there at present & as a long term resident of Horsham. Friends dd is loving it & doing very well, (she's a day pupil btw). Have visited the school for various things over the years & love the site. Used to know a teacher there who ran the Scout Troop.
Not much more to say really, sorry.

Dustylaw Fri 16-Mar-12 23:25:20

CH is a very distinctive independent school but it is also a wonderful school (wonderful, not perfect). Distinctive because it stuck to its founding principles of educating children who, for one reason or another, needed care and education and couldn't pay for it. So it is founded on and has perpetuated the ethos of a public school/independent boarding education based on what you could afford to pay and lots of families pay nothing in school fees or pay only a proportion of school fees. This has started to change as the school has decided that even its massive endowment can't keep pace. Thus, the school is now open to full fee payers (previously it has a cap on these) plus it may be getting less generous with its parental assessments. Plus it has introduced small numbers of day pupils on a full fees basis. You can get the lowdown on this and much else by visiting the Christs Hospital Unofficial forum website. One of the nicest children there could be is currently at the school and loves it. She will shortly be joined by two other delightful children from my daughter's school. My caution would be that dealing with the school itself can sometimes be a trial as they do struggle a bit with getting into the 21st century but that could be said of many schools. Plus some bits haven't really got their heads round the fact that parents paying full or even half fees have different expectations (ie I think the school is historically used to lots of applications from families who are quite grateful to be considered). Well worth a look.

RnB Sun 18-Mar-12 05:50:33

Thanks very much for the info. Am considering entering my son for the exams in a couple of years.

timtimtvr Fri 06-Jul-12 15:42:25

Hi there, likewise am considering the school for my son in a couple of years. Does anyone know of any local tutors in the horsham/crawley/haywards heath area who has experience tutoring for Christ's Hospital entrance exams?
Thanks

derekthehamster Fri 06-Jul-12 15:52:55

I don't think you need to tutor, it's not like the 11+, but more like a sats test, so your child should be used to the format.
Have a look on the website, it gives some examples of the exam
(my son has just finished his first year)

ebramley Tue 10-Jul-12 10:00:28

my brother and sister both went there for their a levels. The learning and opportunities they received in comparison to my state education were huge. They did really well and went to really good uni's because of it. they also met people from all over the world opening up their friendship circle and their minds. they loved it. they found it tough as well but they were well prepared for uni life. I wouldn't have lasted a minute so think it depends on the type of kid your child is. It wont suit everyone.

Colleger Tue 10-Jul-12 22:11:48

I wouldn't touch it with a barge pole. I read an inspection report sometime back where it stated that around 50% of children came from troubled families, including drugs and abuse. I wouldn't send my child to a boarding school filled with troubled teens if I had other options. Of course the ethos of the school is excellent but it's too much of a risk for my liking.

boomting Sun 15-Jul-12 14:57:58

@Collager

I think the major difference is that they are away from that environment, and they thrive in that environment. Children tend to rise to the expectations of those around them, and when expectations are high, discipline strict (as I suspect it is at CH), and they are away from the negative influences of home, they usually excel.

happygardening Sun 15-Jul-12 16:35:22

My friend who removed her DC a few years agi made the same point as colleger the vast majority were there because they needed to be, they lived in catchment area of crappy schools, parental ill health/death/messy divorce etc they found too many needy children not enough normal one. No ones denying that results are good and behaviour was excellent but bring at boarding school isn't just about this.
I believe they recently changed their admission criteria and are opening up to pe

happygardening Sun 15-Jul-12 16:37:05

My friend who removed her DC a few years ago made the same point as colleger the vast majority were there because they needed to be, they lived in catchment area of crappy schools, parental ill health/death/messy divorce etc they found too many needy children not enough normal ones. No ones denying that results are good and behaviour was excellent but being at boarding school isn't just about this.
I believe they recently changed their admission criteria and are opening up to people who can simply afford the fees this may change the dynamics a bit.

HarlotOTara Sun 15-Jul-12 16:49:14

Do 'normal' families not suffer divorce, breavement,ill health etc.? I would love to live in your world happygardening.

I used to go out with a boy from Christ Hospital and was at school with the daughters of the headmaster of the time. All seemed pretty normal to me. It was all boys in those days so the daughters probably had a great time!

happygardening Sun 15-Jul-12 18:40:24

Of course divorce death etc occurs in everyone's worlds as do happy marriages births and 100th birthdays. But it is not a normal to have one or the other dominating the population of a school.

happygardening Sun 15-Jul-12 18:41:37

Of course divorce death etc occurs in everyone's worlds as do happy marriages births and 100th birthdays. But it is not a normal to have one or the other dominating the population of a school.

derekthehamster Sun 15-Jul-12 18:44:44

I'm not divorced/drug or alchohol abuser, neither are any of the parents I know. Alot of the children have disabled siblings which impacts on their lives. The children are all very well behaved and high achievers, it's very hard to get into the school 1000 applicants for 120 places when my son applied.

derekthehamster Sun 15-Jul-12 18:48:10

Sorry, a couple of the parents I know are single mums.

notnowImreading Sun 15-Jul-12 18:57:34

My adopted brother went there for sixth form. I think it saved his life - certainly turned it around. He was happy, secure, challenged and trusted there. He did very well in his a-levels and has continued to do well in his life ever since.

He was probably one of the 'troubled' teens mentioned up-thread, as he was on a full scholarship after both his parents died and he was unhappy and destructive at home with my family. The care and support he was given from day one at the school allowed him to rebuild all the parts of his life taken away by his grief, including his relationship with his family and his sense of himself. Obviously we helped a bit too!

I can't speak too highly of the school. I love the uniforms too - nothing like looking completely ridiculous every day to break down social barriers.

amakiki Thu 07-Feb-13 20:34:32

I am new to this forum and quite amused by some of the posts about Christs Hospital. I am a single parent, will say slightly above income .I am very hardworking parent and have brought up 3 children with good values. I have one child at CH in his 3rd year and I will say it is the best thing that happened. I pay some of the fees according to my wages,but the opportunities are priceless. The children are well behaved and their academic performance excellent. I find it quite funny that people would think it was a school for people with 'problems'' children, yes that is the ethos of the school at the time it was founded. currently I believe it is giving opportunity to bright children whose parents may not be able to send them to schools where they may make the best of their intelligence. My neice went there she is now in a top university and hopefully my daughter will be going this September. BTWthe nearest school to us is an academy which has 2 policemen at the entrance every morning. My son went in a shy timid boy and now he is a confident ,polite, and intelligent young man who speaks german, spanish and loves latin. and yes we are an afro caribbean family who live in South London. CH rocks!!!!

HarrowMom Sun 28-Apr-13 21:01:16

Message deleted by Mumsnet for breaking our Talk Guidelines. Replies may also be deleted.

Biscuitsneeded Sun 28-Apr-13 21:45:45

Oh, Harrow 'mom', are you American? You might want to edit your post; to my British ears it sounds horribly racist...

derektheladyhamster Sun 28-Apr-13 21:58:19

All the children at CH, whatever their creed or colour deserve the education they are getting. The admissions process is very stringent and takes no account of the colour of their skin, just academic merit and the 'need' of an education that CH offers.

The school has many links to inner London, 1/3 of the intake are from this area, which may explain the diversity.

My father went there. He was the son of v v poor clergy who lived overseas. Because of CH he got a public school education, went to Oxford and has been successful throughout adulthood. I know other people who went there too (more recently) and without exception it changed their lives for the better. I think their ethos is outstanding. It's a dream of mine to work there one day.

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