Teachers and extra-curricular/out of school activities

(36 Posts)
fivecandles Thu 05-May-11 16:50:51

Out of interest if you are a teacher:

1.) Is there an expectation that you contribute to extra-curricular activities at your school?
2.) Is there an expectation that you contribute to activities outside of the classroom that would support students' academically e.g. revision sessions? one to one support?
3.) What sort of activities have you been asked/ volunteered to do that are not directly related to your teaching role e.g. trips?
4.) How you received any additional payment for these activities?

Thanks, in advance.

cat64 Thu 05-May-11 17:07:09

Message withdrawn

spanieleyes Thu 05-May-11 17:26:57

1) Yes, all teachers and teaching aistants run after school clubs
2) I run easter Booster sessions for yr 6 in the holidays, any other support is within school time or ( in the case of some 1;1 tuition) by external tutors
3)trips, residentials, whole school sleepovers, attendance at school fetes, PTFA events etc, First Aid training was on Saturdays,
4) i will get paid for the Easter Booster ( although I didn't know when I volunteered to run them that I might!), not for anything else.

desperatelyseekingsnoozes Thu 05-May-11 18:38:28

1.) Yes very much so it is a question we ask at interview and serious note is taken. I think we all provide something.
2.) Yes we all run weekly revision sessions. We also do other types of whole day events. In the past I have done easter boosters. In the past I have run summer schools.
3.) I go on or run a number of trips a year, attend and help out at concerents regularly. Plan and run parents and student socials.
4.) I was once paid for a summer school I ran but not for anything else

pjd Thu 05-May-11 18:47:46

1) have to disagree with spanieleyes, in my school some teachers but by no means all run after school clubs and no teaching assistants run after school clubs, so I guess it depends on the school
2) as above, some teachers run revision session but certainly not all. - I have been doing weekly sessions for 10 weeks in the run up the exam season, but this is my choice. There is limited payment available for this - it has been more in previous years, but budget cuts have meant each subject can only claim for 2 hours. There is more funding available for the core subjects
3) as an MFL teacher I take an annual visit abroad, but I volunteer to do this, I am not asked to
4) see 2 for payment question

Agree with other posters who have said it depends on the school and the HT

HalleluiaScot Thu 05-May-11 18:49:41

1) yes
2) yes
3) after school clubs, residential trips etc
4) no, of course not.

AnnieBesant Thu 05-May-11 18:50:02

1. No - unless you are PE, Music or Drama
2. Oh yes!
3. I did a languages trip once (am a Science teacher) and we have activities week
4. No!!

balia Thu 05-May-11 18:59:22

1) No
2) Yes, it is very much expected that teachers run revision classes, extra coaching/tutoring, extra days in the holidays and long-distance support via email.
3) I go along on trips but no longer organise them due to the level of paperwork.
4) As above, was paid for summer school once and there is money available for one to one tuition but it is very limited and doesn't cover a fraction of the 'extra' that we do. And only for core subjects.

Now - can we ask why you are asking?

corblimeymadam Thu 05-May-11 19:06:45

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

1) No. Teaching assistants or outside agencies run the after school clubs, and of course they get paid for this.
2) Not an expectation but I offered to run a SATs booster, and I get paid by the hour at supply teacher rates.
3) Representing the teaching staff at various events, but not in a teaching capacity. E.g. thinking skills workshop, school fayre, community cohesion projects with our feeder school (evenings and weekends, on occasion).
4) See answer 2.

Why do you ask? smile

corblimeymadam Thu 05-May-11 19:08:30

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

eggsit Thu 05-May-11 19:18:01

1.) Is there an expectation that you contribute to extra-curricular activities at your school?
Not really, as that's against the rules grin, but there are frowns and meaningful glares if teachers don't volunteer for something! (I mean from other teachers - not the HT!)

2.) Is there an expectation that you contribute to activities outside of the classroom that would support students' academically e.g. revision sessions? one to one support?
No. Several teachers were involved in a scheme recently, but they volunteered and they were paid.

3.) What sort of activities have you been asked/ volunteered to do that are not directly related to your teaching role e.g. trips?
Three lunchtime clubs, arrange two music concerts per year, music events at fetes, etc, Creative Partnership meetings and preparation of scrapbooks (hours and hours of work), attendance at Christmas/summer fayres/fetes.

4.) How you received any additional payment for these activities?
No

fivecandles Thu 05-May-11 19:23:25

Why do I ask? See the other thread on social class and gender. Another poster has suggested that extra-curricular and revision activities are or should be paid esp. in the private sector and that any schools which pressured teachers to do extra work were 'abusing' their staff. I disputed this but wanted to check. I have distinct memories of wanting to get involved in extra-curricular work and the school community as an NQT and in my first years of teaching because I genuinely wanted to but also because it was considered to be the done thing to get ahead. But I now work at 6th form level (where we spend a lot of time doing both paid and unpaid revision and extra-curricular stuff but things are a bit different). Although now I'm at a more senior level there's also an expectation (from me as well as from colleagues and SMT) that I'll sort things out like theatre trips for the whole department.

spanieleyes Thu 05-May-11 19:40:25

1) have to disagree with spanieleyes, in my school some teachers but by no means all run after school clubs and no teaching assistants run after school clubs, so I guess it depends on the school
Sorry, pjd, I meant all the teachers and teaching assistants at my school not ALL teachers and teaching assistants

shivanjali Fri 06-May-11 10:27:03

Sorry to interrupt but if people don't mind, could you also add whether you are state or independent sector ? Thanks.

desperatelyseekingsnoozes Fri 06-May-11 18:40:47

State sector.

Fuctifano Fri 06-May-11 20:15:56

1. Hell yes
2. Supported study at lunchtime, Easter hols revision class (have 4 DCs of my own) sad
3.Discos, junior drama group
4. Ha

eggsit Fri 06-May-11 21:14:42

state me too!

pointydog Fri 06-May-11 21:21:19

1. no
2. no
3. camp
4. no

Loshad Fri 06-May-11 22:44:39

1. yes - nearly everyone does. I really enjoy doing things outside of my specialism.
2. yes, would be frowned upon if you refused to offer these - lunchtime def, before and after school less usual.
3. trips of all sorts where extra bodies are needed.
4. once for something i ran in the easter hols (revision class)
this all depends hugely on the ethos in your school - am at outstanding state which aims to close the gap on indis partic in the extracurricular respect, at previuos poor school virtually no-one ran anything for the kids bar the odd dram or footie club.

pointydog Sat 07-May-11 11:41:15

We have a good system where the council emplys Active School Co-ordinators and these sporty people organise a wide range of after-school and lunch time clubs in primary schools. Community Education and Leisure departmetns also organise a huge range of cheap courses and activities after school, at weekends and in the holidays.

This co-ordinated effort is very successful and prevents overloading or over-pressurising school staff.

fivecandles Sat 07-May-11 11:45:22

That is good, pointy but isn't this going to suffer from the cuts?

pozzled Sat 07-May-11 11:46:57

State sector (primary).

1.) No, but it is encouraged.
2.) No, but again it's encouraged. Some TAs are paid to run these kind of activities.
3.) Things like summer/xmas fayre that all staff are expected to attend, but these are counted as directed time. The only thing I can think of in the whole school outside directed time is the Yr 6 residential trip.
4.) Anyone doing one-one outside school hours is paid or has time off in lieu.

desperatelyseekingsnoozes Sat 07-May-11 11:49:26

We have people who come in and organise some things but many teachers enjoy doing this kind of thing. I run or am involved in a lot of extra curricular activities and yes it adds to my workload but I would not want someone to take over.

Maybeitsbecause Sat 07-May-11 11:49:39

State secondary school.

1.) Yes. English teacher. I run three after school clubs a week (two weekly and one monthly).
2.) Yes, at this time of year I run revision classes for GCSE and A Level students. I also ran classes for half of the easter holidays.
3.) I do probably five trips a year (one for each of the year groups I teach), and more in summer term.
4.) No additional payment, but time off in lieu for Easter revision clubs and foreign trips.

desperatelyseekingsnoozes Sat 07-May-11 11:50:44

I don't see how time off in lieu can work although I am happy to be educated.

I was happy to volunteer to do clubs in the early years of my career as I had nothing to rush home for, the planning / assessing expectations were different, but it did prefer to run things at lunchtime. I would never have been paid, but I enjoyed doing them. This would also include running stalks at fairs etc. However I would have been very angry if anyone had told me I had to do it.
Nowadays, I work part time, have a young family at home, and need all my time in school to get the 'teaching' stuff done so I can bring as little as possible home.
The ks2 booster sessions or one to one sessions are all funded afaik and there should be no pressure on anyone to do them, although I many schools the year 6 teachers are expected to. Personally, I wouldn't for the above reasons. But I imagine some of the younger teachers might be keen on the extra money.
In the school I work in, we have a lot of outside sport people who come in to run clubs, as the staff are under huge pressure from Lea and Ofsted to improve Sats results. We are knackered!
It's a shame, but I just could not fit anymore into my day.

Re trips. I have happily done residentials when I was full time and single, but now it's just not fair on my family. Organising day trips is just part of a primary school teacher's normal workload. Neither would be paid extra.

State primary btw

pointydog Sat 07-May-11 20:25:05

Not heard yet about cuts affecting these services, no.

scaryteacher Sat 07-May-11 20:32:02

When teaching in a state secondary I did the following after school:

Mon - GAT club
Tues - Year 11 revision
Thurs - Full course GCSE
Fri - Full course GCSE

I got TOIL for one Full course GCSE after school session (an extra free) after they cocked up my timetable.

I did Easter revision classes (and got paid extra) and I also went aborad every second year with the history trip (even paying for my ds to board for a week at his school as my dh got sent to sea unexpectedly and couldn't do the childcare for the week).

manicinsomniac Sun 08-May-11 02:27:28

1.) Is there an expectation that you contribute to extra-curricular activities at your school?
Yes, all teachers are required to run at least one activity

2.) Is there an expectation that you contribute to activities outside of the classroom that would support students' academically e.g. revision sessions? one to one support?
Not necessarily frm all teachers but where it becomes beneficial to students then yes.

3.) What sort of activities have you been asked/ volunteered to do that are not directly related to your teaching role e.g. trips?
drama club, drama courses, dance clubs, theatre trips, outdoor pursuits residential trips, boarders' residential trips, weekend duties, night duties, productions, overnight camps.

4.) How you received any additional payment for these activities?
No, but some teachers run holiday courses which incur a charge to the parents and they are allowed to keep some of that money.

Independent Prep

mrz Sun 08-May-11 10:37:54

1.) No
2.) No but I do from choice
3.) None but I have led residential visits during school holidays
4.) No
State

EvilTwins Sun 08-May-11 15:23:41

1) No, not at all. I do, but I teach Performing Arts, so it's perhaps more "natural" that I do.

2) No. Again, plenty do, but only if they want to. Even within departments, some do and some don't. I have no need to run revision sessions or whatever, because we do BTECs in KS4 and KS5, so there are no exams. That said, if students are rehearsing a performance and want to do so after school, I will help them out. That comes from them though, rather than from me.

3) I take theatre trips and so on, but again, that's all my decision - no one has ever asked me to do so. Where I teach currently, there is less call for trips etc (sadly) because very few parents have spare cash to pay for optional extras like going to see a play. At previous schools, there has been more money, so I've been able to do more. Pre-DCs, I did several summer schools, but not now.

4) Got paid for summer schools. I used to teach in London (state secondary) and all staff who ran an after school club got paid for it. Lessons would finish at lunchtime on Fridays, and KS3 kids had to attend an extra-curricular club. KS4 kids got the option to attend, to study independently in the library or to go home. Running an enrichment activity was optional, but those who did got paid £20 per hour.The head at the time was v keen to give the students as many opportunities as possible, and it certainly encouraged staff to run something. There was specific funding for it though, not 100% sure where from, but not the school general budget. Never experienced that before or since.

State secondary.

happilyconfused Sun 08-May-11 20:52:23

State secondary

1. yes
2. yes - all subject teachers run 1-2-1 courswork sessions both after school and at lunch plus we have to run revision sessions (it all about the magic A-C number). If I did not I would have to explain why I was not helping students to achieve. I doubt that there is a child in the school who has not had 'coursework support' to achieve a higher grade.
3. yes - have to organise and run trips for off-curriculum days'
4. Payment - must be joking but hopefully I get to keep my job

ElsieR Sun 08-May-11 20:56:13

State secondary.
1. depends what you teach. If you teach PE, yes otherwise no.
2. yes. have done and will do it again.
3. more school trips that I can count. day trips, trips abroad, camp, expeditions.
4.never.

State middle school

1) Yes although not overtly said, most of us run some sort of club but it is actually written into job description of PE staff.
2) Yes I have run booster classes for Y6 classes previously although I have now moved from the English department.
3) Summer fayres, trips, courses, residentials you name it.
4) Paid for booster classes but nothing else, won't be paid for working a day I am normally not in work on the residential for example.

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