Cokethorpe school

(17 Posts)
Poppyella Mon 31-Jan-11 10:43:44

Hi

Reading through the crazy thread about accents, i noted one poster saying to 'avoid Cokethorpe school' in Oxfordshire.

She didn't say why but I am considering sending my DS there in year 7 (he is currently in Year 5) and have been to look around on an open day and was actually really impressed.

Has anyone got a child there, or had experience of this school? And if you have heard to 'avoid Cokethorpe' could you tell me why.

Comments gratefully received.

x

StanHouseMuir Mon 31-Jan-11 15:28:25

Here's the Oxfordshire A level league table for 2010:

www.telegraph.co.uk/education/leaguetables/8254340 /A-level-league-tables-2010-school-by-school.html

...not overly impressive.

Checkmate Mon 31-Jan-11 15:58:27

We discounted it based on the leavers destinations from 2010 www.cokethorpe.org.uk/index.cfm?page=sixthform.con tent&cmid=391 for DS who is fairly academic. The "avoid Cokethorpe" reasons we've heard are all about it not catering to the needs of academic kids.

Though, like you, we liked the "feel" of the school. We have 2 sets of friends with DC there who are very happy. One family have dyslexic DC, and another have DC whose talents are much more sporty than academic. If one of my children fell into a category like that then I would probably send them to Cokethorpe.

So like a lot of schools, its great for the kind of children that it suits grin

Saracen Tue 01-Feb-11 02:12:36

My niece and nephew loved it. They were moved because my nephew was bored and beginning to be disruptive in a state school which didn't suit active boys. He was won over by the cupboard full of maths manipulatives! His sister found it appealing too and asked to join him. She had visited some private schools in Oxford and felt the other girls seemed unwelcoming to people from different backgrounds.

What they liked best about Cokethorpe was that they could do lots of activities during the school day: it wasn't sit-down-and-listen for six hours straight. What they disliked was that as a result of all the activities peppered through the school day, it was quite a long day especially as they travelled an hour each way. I think they were away from home 8-6.

Both did A-levels elsewhere: Cokethorpe would have required them to spend the full day on site which they felt was too restrictive at that age.

BTW niece is fairly academic, nephew very sporty.

Poppyella Tue 01-Feb-11 16:05:50

thanks for all your comments.

I can see that it my suit my son because he is really sporty, bright and could do well but not that bothered about learning and so not highly academic.

It is a long day though.

Checkmate Tue 01-Feb-11 23:01:20

Have you been to see any other independent schools? I find that when we find the "right" one, I get a gut feel about it. So do shop around as much as you can.

Have you looked at the Dragon school, or are you looking for schools further west than that?

StanHouseMuir Tue 01-Feb-11 23:07:38

Take a look at St Edwards in Oxford, which has a sporty reputation, but not overly academic.

milkshake18 Fri 25-Jan-13 11:24:10

Cokethorpe school is amazing. I felt I ought to add some comments to this discussion. My own experience relates to moving my son from state school mid way through his senior years. He has thrived, and is very happy and doing much better than before academically. They have been just brilliant, I would say he is lazy, but the class sizes are small enough that he has nowhere to hide. Don't just look at school results and league tables, there is so much more to a school, and those at the top of the league tables tend to be very selective in the first place, and so I have found them altogether quite misleading. If you want happy children, and a school that will get the best it can from them, then this is a great school.

abittoofat Fri 25-Jan-13 22:46:27

Why not Abingdon? Fantastic for bright sporty boys.

roadkillbunny Sat 26-Jan-13 13:46:06

Cokethorpe is a funny one, it has a reputation for being for less academic more sporty children and very good for those with dyslexia however in the last 5 years or so it has made an effort to attract more high acheivers and is becoming much stronger in regard to academics while still being very inclusive and nurturing.
It is a very long day as sport and other treditionally extra curricular activities are built into the normal school day.
There are so many highly regarded independent schools in the area that cokethorpe can struggle to find it's place but it does have a place for the many children that are very happy there. A friend of mine surprised everyone when her dc1 went on to cokethorpe from a very well regarded academic prep but the child is doing very well and is very happy and for that family it is the only fee paying school that is willing to take their physically disabled younger child when the time comes, that men's a huge amount to them.
If you liked it on visiting and think it would suit your child then I would ignore the slightly snobbish attitude that can surround the school. If it where in an area that didn't have such a wide range of 'top' schools I am sure it wouldn't have the same reputation.
I say this as quite possibly being one of the 'avoid' posters from the other thread however since then I have learned far more about what the school is like and offering these days and have had the testimonial from the friend I talked about up post.

Abra1d Sun 27-Jan-13 22:41:28

I know of four or five families local to me who are very happy with it, more with not-so-academic children, esp. those who love the arts or sport.

Jajas Sun 27-Jan-13 22:45:34

This is an old thread..

Abra1d Mon 28-Jan-13 21:16:19

Doesn't matter: we are posting updates, which will save people having to start new threads.

SausagesDad Mon 02-Sep-13 17:39:26

Have to comment. 'No good for the more academic?' Nonsense. It's a no selective school so the overall results will not match those of selective schools like Teddy's or Abingdon. My children were there. Son got 10a and a* GCsE and aab at A Level, won the county rugby cup, went to India on world challenge expedition, played in a band, sang madrigals...now at Brunel studying design. Daughter got same GCSEs and a* a* a at A level, played county hockey, sang, did amazing art, went on biology expedition to Kenya...about to join Loughborough for art foundation. More importantly the school supported her through ME and CFS. We could not have asked for more. Cokethorpe is exceptional. I used to work there but kept the children there when I left, I would not have them anywhere else.

OxfordshireParent1 Sun 15-Sep-13 08:08:05

The GCSE results certainly also look ok - the % of kids getting passes at the level of an old O-level is in the mid 90s again. But at 6th form level? This year no-one seems to have got into the UK's top four Unis, Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial, UCL, or to do med or vet anywhere. There are no A* grades in any Russell Group recommended A-levels, apart from maths. So no top grades in English, French, History, Geography, Physics, Chemistry, Biology. At A*A cut-off the school achieved 27%, down around the national average for all schools. I'd been quite keen on this school, having heard good things about the environment, but am now deeply worried by the 6th form academic performance. I know averages can be dragged down by keeping on a wider profile of kids through 6th form, and I heard 2012 was a little better, but has anybody got any insight into why the latest results lack any top-end showing, despite the good GCSE profile?

SausagesDad Wed 12-Mar-14 12:35:39

Yes - it's a non-selective school. Ask about individual successes rather than statistics.

State VI forms can (have to be) more selective than non-selective independents.

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