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Is a Down-filled Coat a Bad Idea for Winter in London?

(8 Posts)
BrooklynMamma Wed 24-Jul-13 23:38:12

Hi, all.

I'm moving to London, next month, and I'm wondering if I should buy a new winter coat before I arrive. The coat that I've owned for the past several years has down filling. It has worked for me in both New York and Chicago where, generally, there is not as much ongoing precipitation throughout the winter as there is in London. So, my main concern is that, with what I recall about living in London (years ago) and its rainy winters, my coat might just be wet all of the time, rendering the feathers ineffective for providing warmth. Any thoughts? I also usually have my hands full with my toddler and all of her stuff, so I can't always carry an umbrella to keep my coat dry. Thanks, in advance, for any helpful feedback! If I can avoid buying a new coat, that's fab, but I understand if my current coat just won't work.

swlmum Wed 24-Jul-13 23:44:52

Well it was bloody freezing but dry for half the winter and freezing and wet for the other half! I wore a down coat a lot.
I would wait till you get here- you can get winter coats from £20 to £2000. Not many around yet though...
if North Face etc is much cheaper it might be worth getting a long very waterproof coat but honestly, clothes are very reasonable here.

Scarletbanner Wed 24-Jul-13 23:48:41

I wore my Down-filled parka all the time last winter and I live in London.

Last year was a really cold winter though (for here). In a more normal, warmer, wetter winter, I might not have worn it so much, not because it was too wet, but because it wasn't 't cold enough.

SomewhereBeyondTheSea Wed 24-Jul-13 23:53:36

It's really not that cold here.

I would get another coat. I've lived in London and it rarely gets super cold in the winter (compared to Chicago!) I'd go for something more waterproof/windproof.

But I agree to wait until you get here, no sense taking up valuable packing space with a winter coat in August.

I live in London and use a down jacket during the coldest weeks of the year (probably around a month to six weeks total, although spread over December-February). The thing is that when it's at its coldest (cold enough to need the down jacket) it's generally not raining at more than a light drizzle, and when it's raining the down jacket would generally be too warm to wear. But you would need another (lighter and more waterproof) coat (or a fleece plus a waterproof, which is what I tend to do) for the wetter and warmer days -- or at least a capacious lightweight waterproof that you can fit on on top of the down coat.

This last winter was particularly chuffing cold. Some other winters I'd barely have worn the down jacket (one winter I remember we had roses still blooming in the garden on Christmas Eve).

BrooklynMamma Thu 25-Jul-13 00:42:12

Hmmm...based on what you've all said, I think that I'll have to make space in my closet for my down coat for those days/winters when it is particularly cold. It also seems like I'll need a more versatile coat that will work for wetter/warmer weather. TolliverGroat, I have seen a few nice two-in-one coats with a waterproof outer shell and separate, removable fleece jacket that zips into the coat. One of those might do the trick. I have a ski coat, for example, that is like that, but it's not really anything that I'd want to wear to regularly to work or out in the evening, for example. Again, I do think that it's possible to find dressier versions. Perhaps I can find one and save a few dollars before I depart, but as you mentioned, Swimum, it's quite difficult to find winter clothing, right now. In any event, thanks, again, for all of the helpful advice!

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