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One off child care for 10 week old

(28 Posts)
Granadilla Thu 28-Nov-13 18:17:23

Hi,

My little boy is 9 weeks old. In the next week or so I have meetings which I can't take him to which will last 3-4 hrs. My husband works and I don't have any family close by who I could leave him with.

What have other mums done in this situation? I don't feel comfortable leaving him with a stranger, but not sure of an alternative. Also, do childminders take babies so young and on an adhoc basis?

Thanks

SoonToBeSix Thu 28-Nov-13 18:22:50

Can't your dh take annual leave?

anothernamechangerreally Thu 28-Nov-13 18:25:15

Yes surely your dh will have to take annual leave?

Karoleann Thu 28-Nov-13 19:07:30

I think he's too little to be at a childminder, you're better off contacting a nanny agency and getting a temp nanny with new born experience for the meetings.

None of my children were distressed at all when they were left at that age. As long as they are fed, cuddled and following their usual routine in their home environment, they've been fine.

OddFodd Thu 28-Nov-13 19:11:18

You need a nanny. If you google emergency nanny, you should find a number of options. If you know when the meetings will be, you can hopefully meet the nanny in advance (you'd have to pay for their time) and block book the same person for all your meetings.

minderjinx Thu 28-Nov-13 19:32:08

I have a little boy who started at 5 weeks. I have also done one-off care for quite small babies while Mum had job interviews or medical appointments. I think it's actually a lot easier with a very small baby than with an older baby or toddler - as long as they are fed, dry and cuddled they are usually blissfully unaware whose arms they are in. I would look for a childminder or nanny offering emergency or ad hoc care.

cathpip Thu 28-Nov-13 19:36:32

I am a nanny and did look after the next door neighbours 5 week old a couple of times whilst mum went to medical appointments, a nanny agency will be able to provide you with an emergency nanny, it could be expensive though.

MissOtisRegretsMadam Thu 28-Nov-13 19:43:46

Most nurseries and possible childminders only take babies from 12 weeks. Look for an agency for relief nannies?

Blondeshavemorefun Thu 28-Nov-13 21:16:50

Agree a temp/emergency nanny is the best option

What are are you and maybe one of us can help you or recommend an agency near you?

Twinklestarstwinklestars Fri 29-Nov-13 04:18:30

Lots of childminders don't have an age limit, my friend took a 3 week old on full time! I'm one and would do it, maybe ring a few and ask. Could be handy as a back up in the future if you need odd hours here and there too.

HSMMaCM Fri 29-Nov-13 07:44:52

Yes. CM or nanny. Many CMs will be full, so nanny might be easier. Also nanny is in your home, which will probably be more convenient (but maybe cost more).

Granadilla Fri 29-Nov-13 09:25:25

Thanks for the replies. My husband has recently started a new job and does not have any leave that he can take.

I am in south east London.

TeamSouthfields Fri 29-Nov-13 09:35:38

likeminders!

twojues Fri 29-Nov-13 10:23:43

I am a childminder and looked after a baby from 6 weeks old. They are much easier the younger they are as they won't have the separation anxiety that hits at a later age.
Whereabouts are you in south east london? I might be able to help you.

looneytune Fri 29-Nov-13 11:18:33

I was childminding until recently and had 2 children start with me at 8 weeks old, another started adhoc at 5 weeks and contracted from 7 weeks, this was not a problem at all and in fact they were a lot easier as too young for separation anxiety. Yes, some don't take them that early but lots do (I always loved little babies coming round :-) ). Hope you manage to sort something

ReetPetit Fri 29-Nov-13 13:06:23

childminders take babies from whatever age they decide - there is no minimum. I would try and find a cm with a vacancy or a nanny though an agency (will be expensive though)

Personally, I would insist on taking the baby with me. Surely the people you work with know you've just had a baby?!

minderjinx Fri 29-Nov-13 13:44:05

My former manager moved a meeting to my house shortly after I had my littlest! Just a thought grin

Tanith Fri 29-Nov-13 14:10:28

Why too little to be at a childminders? confused

My DD was 2 weeks when I had all the kids back again. We can cope with small babies, you know - most of us have had our own!

Poloholo Fri 29-Nov-13 19:18:43

I'm going to need to arrange a couple of days emergency nanny in London - any recs for an agency? Toddler age.

Lucylouby Fri 29-Nov-13 19:48:35

I'm a cm and would take a tiny baby, either full time or as you are needing for ad hoc care. Unfortunately I'm not in London, but I'm sure there must be a cm near you who could help you out.

Karoleann Fri 29-Nov-13 22:37:49

Tanith - yes, too little to be at a childminders for half a day as a one off.
They're fairly easy at 9 weeks, but they need their routine - which you can't adhere to if you're dealing with other children as well, especially if they're not used to lots of noise, going on school runs etc.
They're still fairly delicate at 9 weeks and you don't really want lots of older children poking at them.

Obv if its a regular thing, its very different (or if they have older siblings - which thisLO doesn't).

TeamSouthfields Fri 29-Nov-13 23:25:28

agency 'likeminders' in London

ReetPetit Sat 30-Nov-13 10:21:09

Karoleann, I disagree that 9 weeks is too young to be with a cm. I have had many little ones (a few younger than 9 weeks) and tbh at this age they don't really care/know who they are with as long as their needs are met.

You also can't assume that all cms have noisy homes with lots of children and are going on school runs etc!

Some may have no children, some may have only one, some may only be working a couple of days a week - you won't know unless you ask!!

Tanith Sat 30-Nov-13 11:10:02

It would be more helpful to the Op if you based your advise on experience and not on prejudice, Karoleann. When was the last time you used a childminder? It's pretty clear to me that you don't know what you're talking about!

eeyore12 Sat 30-Nov-13 13:45:19

Op if you are anywhere near Epsom in Surrey my mum may be able to help you out has been a childminder for over 30 yrs and still is, the youngest she has had was 10 weeks when he started full time and is now nearly 20!

If you want to chat more please email me amanda@sbmcraftsandcards.co.uk

Poloholo Sat 30-Nov-13 19:51:06

Thanks for the recommendation teamsouthfields

Karoleann Sat 30-Nov-13 22:18:06

No am speaking from experience, majority of childminders have more than one child they look after.
9week olds happier in their own routine and are better looked after in their own home.
As I posted, if it were a regular thing, they'd easily adapt to a different routine, but if it were a new childminder, a different routine and a different location - its bound to be unsettling.
Why upset things for the sake of a few hours?
The OP asked for advice about the best childcare solution for her problem.

Lonecatwithkitten Sun 01-Dec-13 10:28:12

There are nurseries that can take them from birth. My DD went ad hoc from 10 weeks and then full time from 12 weeks. It was a small nursery and they stuck to the routine DD had created for herself. For me this was the right option and actually cheaper than a childminder.

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