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Dog and childminder - what to ask/expect?

(81 Posts)
MummyOfSunbeam Fri 31-May-13 20:19:01

Hi all

I am not keen on dogs generally (more a cat person!), but as a result I don't know much about them and so assume they are probably fine. But a CM I am very interested in does have a jack Russell dog who I believe roams free and is a much loved part of the family.

I am nervous about my 9 mth baby dd with a dog though. Various sites feature childminders with dogs who all seem to say dogs should never be left unsupervised with babies etc, and that even if peaceful for years can always unpredictably snap - I was startled to read that from dog-owners themselves!

What should I be asking about how much access the dog will have to my baby? In sine ways my total dog ignorance might be making me too relaxed here. My utter priority is her safety. I am HARDLINE about that.

Goldmandra Tue 11-Jun-13 21:55:20

Oh dear. I never thought of that!

Our house is fragrance free so I never wear perfume. I hope the parents I've minded for don't think I didn't cuddle their LOs sad

MummyOfSunbeam Wed 12-Jun-13 11:02:39

Grin - I am sure they realise gold! We are fragrance free here too, and I never wear any. So I really notice it on her hair etc after someone else hugs her! But I must celebrate it as a sign that she is being cherished. (Just hope I am not allergic to whatever they wear! Am allergi to quite a lot of fragrance)

Goldmandra Wed 12-Jun-13 12:31:27

Allergies are issue here too, along with sensory processing.

Parents have always seemed very happy so hopefully they have never read MN and expected to smell perfume smile

ChippingInWiredOnCoffee Wed 12-Jun-13 12:51:18

I never wear any fragrance if I know I am going to be spending time with a small baby - I just think it's nicer for them... but you can still guarantee they've been cuddled to within an inch of their lives grin

The nursery sounds better for your needs and don't forget - if you don't like it, you can move her smile

PS: 'A dog' wouldn't be a deal breaker for me, but a Jack Russel would for sure. Nasty nippy little buggers that I wouldn't trust even if there was an adult present all the time. I'd sooner have a big old soft rottie smile

whatisyourview Sat 15-Jun-13 21:31:33

I think its safe as long as the dog and baby are happy. Always ask to see OFSTED information and if he/she refuses, look at the Certificate of Registration for the code. It should start with EY for Early Years. Pop that into the OFSTED Tracker and you can also use this for any childcare as long as their registered. Hope this helped!

Jiina Sun 16-Jun-13 02:49:00

I've been working for just over a year and my dog was three months old when I started. He's a big dog, and he has free range of the house when the children are here. In reality this means he has free range to move between the sofas and comfy chairs so he can snooze all bloody morning. He adores his babies (he waits for them in the window in the morning), and they love him right back. Because he's basically grown up alongside them, he's used to having things thrown at him, dropped on him, being painted, 'patted' over enthusiasically, etc. I still don't ever leave them alone together - if I need to pee he goes in another room with the door shut. Same when people are leaving or arriving (he's very good at this now). If he gets too bouncy I just put him out in the garden.

A dog wouldn't be an automatic deal breaker for me, but unsecured bookshelves, stone fireplaces with no fire guard, and a baby sleeping on the sofa definitely would be. Especially when the CM sees nothing wrong with that!

BTW, Ofsted actually do two kinds of inspection for new childminders:

A registration inspection is to make sure that your home is safe, that you have the necessary qualifications (first aid, etc) and that your paperwork is coming together (risk assessments, etc) and happens before they issue you with your registration certificate.

A grading inspection occurs within the first 6 months of you taking on a child, because they give you the time to build up a relationship with the child (or not, as the case may be) so that they can assess you on your actual work skills and how well you actually care for the children.

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