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Continual Professional Development course for nannies?

(29 Posts)
AndBingoWasHisNameOh Tue 05-Feb-13 09:18:59

We have a nanny who looks after our 13 month old DD. She has been with us since the autumn and is very experienced although doesn't have much in the way of formal training save for first aid.

I was wondering whether we should look into training courses for her to do that might help her develop skills that would help with DD. More of the theory of child developemnt, learning through play or something like that? Perhaps also food hygiene certificate? I'd be happy to pay up to a few hundred pounds and give her paid time off to do it for a few days if worthwhile. There is no need for language training.

DH looked at me like I was bonkers when I suggested this but I work in a profession that requires a certain number of hours of training per year to keep the registration so to me it didn't seem so odd.

So, good idea or patronising? If a good idea any suggestions for courses?

OutragedFromLeeds Thu 07-Feb-13 19:11:51

It's spotting the good course from the bad prior to dropping hundreds of pounds to do it though.

Perhaps you should start your own school of nannying Frak? grin

fraktion Thu 07-Feb-13 19:24:03

I'd love to grin

I truly feel that nannies are getting a raw deal with CPD. There's a limited range of specific courses and access to LEA training is jealously guarded. I also sense that nannies themselves would participate more if there were more accessible and affordable courses, but those are kept for nurseries or CMs and the Govt's non-stance on nannies doesn't help. There was no mention whatsoever of them in More Great Childcare, no notion of supporting 30,000+ early years workers who need to access that training possibly even more than nursery workers because they're autonomous and rely in their own knowledge and judgement to do their job. It's isolating and it risks the perpetuation of outdated and potentially dangerous practices like mixing standard formula powder with room temp water or putting babies on their front to sleep without medical guidance.

OutragedFromLeeds Thu 07-Feb-13 20:04:01

'like mixing standard formula powder with room temp water'

This is one of the areas where my comments were not welcome. The HV told them it was OK apparently! Don't get me started on newborn in a moses basket on the back seat of the car....

I've got a work review due soon, I'm going to bring this up and see what they say. My current employers are very supportive generally so it will be interesting to see what they say.

fraktion Thu 07-Feb-13 21:32:18

Ouch.

I once told employers that it was entirely up to them what they did but my insurers would expect me to take every reasonable step when I was responsible and I would be following the NHS and manufacturer guidelines unless they could produce a signed letter from a paediatrician. I wasn't opening myself up to that kind of liability.

And I'd be reporting the HV angry

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