when do you discuss birth choices?

(10 Posts)
squizita Mon 05-May-14 11:26:29

I have a 24 WK appointment with my GP, and a 26 WK with my actual hospital consultant - at which of these should I raise birth plan/birth choices? Knowing the GPs admin team, I'd rather wait till the 26 weeks and talk direct to the hospital team (or the letter will arrive in time for baby's 1st birthday if at all!). Is that too late?

I don't have any unusual requests. I would like to use the (onsite) MW led unit if possible. If not, (clinically - I am high risk - or as someones already in there) I just want a talk through preferences such as pain relief etc. I would also like a tour if they do them. That's all, I think its quite "normal"? At St Marys Paddington if that helps.

Thanks! smile

mismylinford Mon 05-May-14 11:39:45

Not from the area, but with my dd i had a choice of a special birthing unit where having a epd was not available and calm natural births was encouraged with little or no pain relief. Or the main hospital in the area. I had a tour of.both places and was told everything i needed to know about what will happen with me in almost every scenario. It really helped md with confidence about the birth and went on to have a complete drug free birth. You should be very welcomed to have a look round meet midwifes etc i.would make a list of things you'd like to ask as you always forget. Congrats and good luck

squizita Mon 05-May-14 12:25:19

Thanks. I've heard good things about birth at my hospital... Heard the ward afterwards is mega noisy though!

Pregnantagain7 Mon 05-May-14 13:11:28

I was under consultant lead care for my last two births and will be for this one, I was not allowed to use the mw led unit I think this is quite standard but obviously totally depends on your consultant, hospital and the reason for being under a consultant.

I was never really given an opportunity to discuss birth with anyone the hospital midwives were always too busy, the consultant gave the impression it wasn't really his department confused I found the antenatal classes good for the first two great about discussing ins and outs of birth and pain relief.

I was advised to write down in my notes anything I did/didn't want but was warned that sometimes they are overlooked so to make sure dh knew what I wanted even though I would change my mind in labour!!

I believe that hospital tours are really good but when I called to book at 6 months pregnant the tours were booked until after my due date!

But despite all this I did have very good births I would perhaps start thinking bout what you would like try and get a place on a course. Hopefully you will have a better experience than me I do remember thinking especially with my first omg I'm going to have a baby and nobody is interested or helping me!
I must say when I was in labour the midwives were amazing! smile

Pregnantagain7 Mon 05-May-14 13:14:04

Oh and when you go to the post natal ward I would recommend a private room if you can do it financially best thing ever, I was asking about it as soon as I arrived at the hospital! At my hospital it was about £90 well worth itsmile

squizita Mon 05-May-14 17:31:22

Pregnant thanks! Great advice! smile Will ask about a private room, I believe they have them.

pickletalk14 Mon 05-May-14 22:41:37

Our midwife led unit is like fort knox you can only tour once you've passed the initial referral.. they say it's because so many people end up being ineligible for clinical reasons (low iron is one).

I made it to assessment but only at 37weeks. I know a few others that have toured at around 36 I.e. feels very late!!

At the assessment was the first time in my pregnancy anyone had wanted to discuss birth plans/ pain relief. I think they leave it to the antenatal classes. The only pain relief at our mlu is gas and air and pethidine. If you want an epidural it's labour ward (I only found this out at the assessment, would have made more sense to tell me earlier?).

Should say I'm in Lewisham.

PenguinsLoveFishFingers Tue 06-May-14 00:11:42

Afaik no MLUs offer epidural. Because it is a doctor administered procedure.

Sorry no one told you though!

pickletalk14 Tue 06-May-14 06:58:27

I don't mind I'm happy to try without (labour ward is only next door for a transfer) but I just find it odd that they give you so little info prior to the assessment whenit could have been a waste of everybody's time if I was always considering the epidural.

Does that make sense? Another frustration of the NHS (which I work in, not a moan!)

squizita Tue 06-May-14 08:26:38

Penguins that is exactly why I want to investigate what pain relief I am most likely to need before I get my heart set on a MLU. But I guess many things they won't even know till the offset (e.g. if the baby was back-to-back I would opt for drugs, based on what RL people have told me! Or if baby was v late and I was induced it would be labour ward anyway).

Heard too many people posting heartbroken because their medical situation didn't allow it after they had their heart set or realising half way through pushing they really needed more meds and transferring.

I like to be quite 'aware' of my situation - I know only visualising the 'ideal' works for some people but not for me. Hence I'd like a tour/info on everything from pool/gas/air to full on drugs and procedures for intervention.

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