Vbac - monitoring

(19 Posts)
mostlyconfused Sat 08-Mar-14 23:00:13

I'm currently 38weeks with dc2. Dc1 was born by emergency c section due to lack of progress. I was continually monitored throughout my last labour( I had a high heart rate) which meant I was stuck on a bed and unable to move for 18 hours. I found this complete hell! I had terrible back pain that no drugs took away and felt trapped on the bed.
I want to go for a natural birth this time but it seems that continues monitoring is recommended. I really don't want this but don't want to do anything that could put my little boy at risk.

If anyone is willing to share there experience of a vbac I would appreciate it. Getting myself worked up over this!

MouseSquirrelMum Sat 08-Mar-14 23:54:15

Hello mostly
I had a planned section (breech) then a vbac, and was worried about this too. I was also very keen for a vbac and to avoid things that start going back toward a surgical process. I don't have any magic answers, but I can tell you what I did….

I suppose what most helped me feel less worked up about it all was talking to people and feeling I'd got some kind of say in what happened. I spoke to my consultant a few times about what I wanted and didn't want, got (free) advice from a short call to an independent doula on what to ask for and wrote a (slightly obsessive!) birth plan so at least those around me would know what I wanted without having to ask me. I ended up in a sort of "monitor me if you need to but help me try to avoid it" position. "trying to avoid it" was trying to do things that would keep me away from the delivery room until I really needed to be there - stuff like hypnotherapy cds beforehand on mindset and pain management, tens machine, asking to be left to labour without disturbance, birthing ball etc

In fact, I was in hospital for ages before officially in labour (too keen!), during which I was only monitored some of the time, which was ok (but long!).
Once I was in labour I was so focussed on the hypnotherapy stuff (and tired) that staying on the bed worked ok for me some of the time and they didn't monitor me all the time so I moved about in between. DH and I did have to keep reminding them to take it off. At some point they took me to the delivery room and then a brilliant thing happened - a doctor came in, said "I've read your birth plan and if you really want a vbac, you shouldn't be in the delivery room lying down being monitored, you should be back on the ward and we'll bring you back when you're really ready".

Hope that helps - for what it's worth I also heard that it's possible in some places to pay for a wireless monitor you can move about with, or even one you can use in a pool. Not at my (large, teaching) hospital though.

By the way, the vbac was just amazing compared to the section. smile

mostlyconfused Sun 09-Mar-14 00:02:57

That's for sharing that with me. I do feel a bit better now. I'm not usually the best at speaking up for myself but I'm going to try! I'll get a birthing plan written out and make sure DH knows what I want so he can back me up.

Fingers crossed it all goes to plan.

Thanks again grin

MouseSquirrelMum Sun 09-Mar-14 00:14:03

You're very welcome
Lots of luck, mostly
Try not to worry grin
If you fancy it, I used the NCT vbac hyno cd set - it was a reasonable price and just very relaxing to listen to before the birth, nothing weird, and helped me go into the birth feeling much happier and in control. It had a bit about dealing with how you feel about a previous section too.
I look forward to hearing when you've got your lovely baby

Teatimecakes Sun 09-Mar-14 10:08:47

Mouse - that dr sounds amazing!what hospital was this? This would never happen at my local hospital where the vbac rate is very low and all consultants reccomend that all previous cs have a repeat. As such I'm paying an Indepent midwife to look after me at home, then depending how I feel at the time, she'll transfer me in for the birth or we'll go for it at home.

I'm also in this position (ds was planned cs for breech) and am desperate for vbac, feeling completely robbed of the whole experience. Reading your story has really helped - thanks x

Teatimecakes Sun 09-Mar-14 10:10:24

Mouse - that dr sounds amazing!what hospital was this? This would never happen at my local hospital where the vbac rate is very low and all consultants reccomend that all previous cs have a repeat. As such I'm paying an Indepent midwife to look after me at home, then depending how I feel at the time, she'll transfer me in for the birth or we'll go for it at home.

I'm also in this position (ds was planned cs for breech) and am desperate for vbac, feeling completely robbed of the whole experience. Reading your story has really helped - thanks x

theborrower Mon 10-Mar-14 21:20:33

I'm pregnant with DC2, had an EMCS first time round. Just had an appointment with a consultant the other week to discuss VBAC, and we discussed monitoring. She said they advise/will do continuous monitoring, but said they have monitors that are 'telemetry' monitors, which are a bit like radio transmitters, meaning I can be very mobile and even use a pool if I want to. I was pleasantly surprised because I had thought continuous monitoring = strapped to a bed. However, on another thread someone said their hospital didn't have these. Is it worth checking out?

jacksgas Mon 10-Mar-14 22:23:55

Most maternity units have telemetry monitoring equipment. Any midwife worth her salt will encourage active birth as this gives the best chance for VBAC

Teatimecakes Tue 11-Mar-14 19:46:45

My hospital doesn't have these - I was told they were unreliable and expensive by my very c section friendly consultant

BikeRunSki Tue 11-Mar-14 20:01:16

I had an emcs with dc1 as he was undiagnosed footling breech. Three years later I was going to have dc2 as vbac and was going to pg yoga/,.hypnobirthing classes to prepare. My consultant wanted me to have continuous monitoring, but we agreed on 20 min per hour. Very fortunately for me the MWs very all attending another birth and the monitoring equipment got left on me longer, so we all knew when I haemorrhaged and dd's heart stopped. She was the quickest crash section ever ! She was fine the moment she was born. I had a rupture of my original internal cs scar.

I went into my vbac very positive and somewhat gung-ho, but I now feel that if a consultant suggests monitoring for a vbac it may be prudent not to turn it down outright and to find a happy compromise.

theborrower Tue 11-Mar-14 20:40:42

BikeRunSki hello, I remember you from threads a few years ago :-)

When your scar ruptured, was it obvious it was happening, apart from the monitoring I mean? Was it all very sudden? My consultant said the pain is unmistakable. I just wondered what it was like, and how much 'warning' there is because I'm a bit scared of that

BikeRunSki Tue 11-Mar-14 22:03:18

There was constant pain, like one huge long contraction but with no break. MW didn't seem to understand this. and basically said "of course it hurts, would you like some pethidine?" I crawled to the loo for a wee (I literally could not stand up) and there was some blood (not a lot). Nothing so major that it grabbed the MW's attention.

mostlyconfused Wed 12-Mar-14 01:12:11

Thanks for sharing your story BikeRunSki.

I think I've decided to go with the constant monitoring if that's what they recommend. It might mean I'm miserable and uncomfortable but I'd never forgive myself if something was missed because I refused it.
I would love a great experience this time but as long as my boy gets out safety one way or another, I don't suppose it really matters.

Thanks to everyone for sharing smile

ZingSweetMango Wed 12-Mar-14 01:30:02

I had ELSC with DS4, then had VBAC with both DS5 & DD.
I'm a fan of epidurals so asked for and got it both times.

(also had epidurals with DS1 & DS2 as I was induced with both.
no pain relief with DS3 as he came too quickly)

I'm pg again, due in July and planning for another VBAC plus epidural combo - it is managed in a way that the epidural is topped up as needed but they let it wear off in time for the pushing bit - for that part I had no pain relief with my last two and I found the pain actually helped to concentrate and be in full control.

htg and good luck

ZingSweetMango Wed 12-Mar-14 01:32:52

and had constant monitoring for both VBACs, which didn't bother me as it meant I could dilate without the pain!smile smile

MouseSquirrelMum Thu 13-Mar-14 00:29:23

Hello teatimecakes
Just spotted your question - that was Manchester children's hospital. My consultant turned out to be very pro vbac and I asked her to write on the birthplan that she supported my ideas and her team could call her if she was off duty to ask questions. She wasn't there when the doctor moved me back to the ward, but maybe the note helped! Tbh apparently I was a bit unusual in my level of focus on the topic so I think I caught their attention

Bikerunski thanks for sharing your story too, so glad it turned out well

Good luck to everyone whatever you choose, and those telemetry monitors sound brilliant

redcaryellowcar Thu 13-Mar-14 01:01:51

I had continuous monitoring as was induced, not vbac. I had a brilliant student midwife who was incredibly patient and allowed me to roam within the confines of the length of the monitoring wires. I managed to stand at the window, sit on the floor, lean on the bed etc, the wires are actually quite long, i think the problem is the more you move the more likely you will lose the connection and need to readjust the pads on your tummy, this is where an enthusiast and patient midwife was brilliant . When shifts changed the next midwife wasn't anywhere near as helpful, so i ended up stuck on the bed.

Teatimecakes Thu 13-Mar-14 17:24:40

Thanks for sharing - I'm in the fourth so jo chance of seeing the same person sad I'm booking with an indepentent midwife so I will have all her expertise on my side

Teatimecakes Thu 13-Mar-14 17:25:05

South !

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