Home or the hospital

(87 Posts)
jessnoble Sat 21-Dec-13 18:25:29

I was just wondering, what are peoples opinion on giving birth at home or in a hospital e.g. advantages/ disadvantages

It would be a great help smile

LaVolcan Thu 26-Dec-13 16:55:12

There are things you can do to increase your chances of better care though. Having a slightly unconventional birth plan makes it more likely you'll get a more experience midwife for example.

I think that this is something you often don't realise with your first one, especially if you don't know anyone who has had a baby recently. I believed what I was told, which was about an idealised system, which wasn't how it worked in real life.

Second time round, I learnt that there were other options, which would have been far better for me, including homebirth which I went for the second time and MLUs, which I would have probably chosen for the first. I wasn't really all that interested in hearing about how wonderful the CLU was for women who had health conditions which didn't affect me.

Bunbaker Thu 26-Dec-13 16:51:06

Ah right.

selfdestructivelady Thu 26-Dec-13 16:27:57

No when feeding was not established you would have been admitted.

Bunbaker Thu 26-Dec-13 15:50:03

"I had a phone nnumber for the ward and the me stayed a couple of hours to check how feeding was going so the mw would not have left if the baby wasn't feeding and if you had concerns you could of called and they come back out."

In that case the mw would have stayed for 4 days.

NaturalBaby Thu 26-Dec-13 15:19:43

It depends on where the mother to be feels safest - for me it was home every time. I wasn't sick, I had no risks, I didn't need to be in hospital and was only a few minutes away so the MW assured me I would receive treatment as quickly as women on the labour ward if I needed it.

I also wanted to be completely alone - to labour, give birth and establish bf. I knew where help and support was if/when I needed it and I didn't want to presume that I would need medical intervention.

selfdestructivelady Thu 26-Dec-13 15:18:32

I had a phone nnumber for the ward and the me stayed a couple of hours to check how feeding was going so the mw would not have left if the baby wasn't feeding and if you had concerns you could of called and they come back out.

Bunbaker Thu 26-Dec-13 15:14:53

"But you would have been able to transfer in if that was the case"

But I wouldn't have realised at home as I knew absolutely nothing about babies. I just thought DD wanted to sleep. If I had been at home I would have waited 24 hours for the midwife to visit the next day.

StarlightMcKingsThree Thu 26-Dec-13 15:06:58

'It's a huge lottery as to the care with any birth! Unless maybe you're flagged early on as high risk?'

There are things you can do to increase your chances of better care though. Having a slightly unconventional birth plan makes it more likely you'll get a more experience midwife for example.

Having a homebirth means you get more 1:1 observation and potential risks are flagged earlier.

starlight1234 Thu 26-Dec-13 15:06:43

I think it depends on what you want...I had to have Hospital birth because I was induced due to a blood condition...I would of given birth in hospital anyway..for me I felt reassured the emergency equipment and staff were around...

I had a newly qualified MW deliver my son...she was very supportive ..I was far more relaxed at hospital...

selfdestructivelady Thu 26-Dec-13 14:59:27

The drive the bumps I had all back to back babies and sitting or lying was unbearable being in the car was horrendous on my two hospital births I would much rather calmly make my way there post birth.

selfdestructivelady Thu 26-Dec-13 14:57:39

But you would have been able to transfer in if that was the case I don't see the problem confused and moving in with a young baby is preferable to me than going to hospital while in labor.

Bunbaker Thu 26-Dec-13 14:53:51

"It all depends on the staff involved"

Exactly. But when you have a baby that simply isn't interested in feeding and then goes all floppy because the blood sugar drops I found hospital a better place for me.

selfdestructivelady Thu 26-Dec-13 14:42:51

And mw to me.

selfdestructivelady Thu 26-Dec-13 14:42:15

Sorry my phone changed bf to nd a few times.

selfdestructivelady Thu 26-Dec-13 14:40:40

I found it awful trying to bf in hospital every me showed me a different way. Each one saying I was doing it wrongwhen ds was latched on correct with no pain (as I now know after bf 3 babies for a total of 7 years experience) I had the woman in the bed opposite bragging her baby was feeding for a hour when mine was only feeding for ten minutes. The way the mws showed me was causing me pain and they wouldn't let me home till I fed their way and being only 17 I didn't feel strong enough to just tell them to fuck off.

There was a constant stream of male visitors making me feel uncomfortable having my baps out. Mws were constantly man handling my breasts without consent making me sore. In the end I bf the way they wanted me to while holding back tears just to be discharged.

Then at home I was able to sit down quietly on my own and figure out what felt right.

At my homebirth the mws stayed till I showed them a good latch and said if I hadn't I'd have had the option to transfer in. When a breast pad got stuck to my nipple after a day or two I pulled it off and took a chunk of skin with it I was offered a nd counsellor within hours. It all depends on the person just because someone finds peace and quiet easier to learn to nd doesn't mean they had a easy time.

It all depends on the staff involved so it doesn't really factor in besides you can transfer or have the me stay for a bit if you find bf hard

Bunbaker Thu 26-Dec-13 08:43:19

Thank you msmiggins. The fact is that without the support of the midwives at the hospital who were at my beck and call whenever I needed them I would not have been able to establish breastfeeding at all.

"You get to establish BF with no one watching and no one judging, it's utter bliss."

Well bully for you.You are lucky that you found it easy. My baby didn't want to feed and wouldn't latch on. She would have been bottle fed pretty much straight away without the ongoing help over several days I received at the hospital.

msmiggins Thu 26-Dec-13 08:15:30

"You get to establish BF with no one watching and no one judging, it's utter bliss."

I was able to establish breastfeeding with my first with a very relaxed supportive, unjudgemental, encouraging, knowledgable, midwife in hospital.

Second time around I was home from hospital before my DD had her first proper feed.

Establishing breastfeeding alone at home is not such a "natural" situation, in fact quite Westerized manufactured situation.
If you look at cultures where home birth ( and breastfeeding) is the norm a new mother will have several elder experienced women around her to give support and encoragement while she estabishes breastfeeding.
It's not normally a solo pursuit.

NoComet Thu 26-Dec-13 00:48:36

No you get left in peace by the time the baby is three hours old.

That's the whole point if a home birth.

You get to establish BF with no one watching and no one judging, it's utter bliss.

Bunbaker Wed 25-Dec-13 23:10:39

"No, but in which hospital does a midwife stay with you day and night? Or even an hour? The postnatal wards are the worst staffed, so you could easily go 8 hours without seeing anyone."

When I had DD 13 years ago every time I wanted to feed her and she wouldn't latch on I pressed the buzzer and one came straight away to help get her latched on. I wouldn't have been able to do that at home.

LaVolcan Wed 25-Dec-13 21:01:33

If you have a home birth does the midwife stay with you day and night for several days?

No, but in which hospital does a midwife stay with you day and night? Or even an hour? The postnatal wards are the worst staffed, so you could easily go 8 hours without seeing anyone.

NoComet Wed 25-Dec-13 17:51:25

HOME

RedToothBrush Wed 25-Dec-13 17:21:51

msmiggins Wed 25-Dec-13 10:24:22
It's not possible to eradicate all the bias.

I actually disagree with this. I think you can have an unbiased view if you start to listen to what a particular woman thinks is most important when it comes to her impeding birth.

There are women who are calm, low risk and generally want as natural birth as possible.

There are women who are more anxious, not necessarily high risk, but might be more at risk and are largely indifferent to the birth they want.

I think it is wrong to ignore this and to try and push women done one path or another without being a) honest about their chances of success or b) being over zealous about the absolute need for hospital care.

I don't think that stating X is 'best' is necessarily the best approach to have. The approach does not cater for the multitude of the enormous range of variables out there.

A woman who is listened to, respect and informed and has an intervention heavy birth, could have a 'better' birth than a woman who has a traumatic birth at home where she isn't in control and isn't consulted about decisions in her care.

The current stats reflect not only a potential risk, but also lack of skills within the profession and that certain groups of women might be actively choosing one service over another or are preventing certain services. I think it is possible to spot patterns where this is happening; even without full disclosure of certain information, if you are savy.

The point is more that there are groups that are actively choosing the bias rather than the fact it might be difficult to eliminate. And thats the real question we should be looking at. Why?

Bias can be eliminated, but the strength of character it requires to do so makes that exceptionally difficulty. Its always just easily to ignore information or to disassociate yourself from it in someway.

Bunbaker Wed 25-Dec-13 16:33:26

"but you don't know that bunbaker you could have had just as much bfing support at home"

If you have a home birth does the midwife stay with you day and night for several days? DD just would not latch on and I needed someone straight away every time I tried to feed DD. When she was a couple of days old she went drowsy and her blood sugar plummeted because she wouldn't feed. I was jolly glad we were still in hospital. She finally learned how to latch on when she was 4 days old.

ilovesmurfs Wed 25-Dec-13 16:07:38

I got crap bfeeding advice in hospital. Much better support once at home from a bfeeding counsellor.

It all varies, I had good births in hospital, four of them anyway, crap post natal care,,so glad to be able to discharge after four hours.

but you don't know that bunbaker you could have had just as much bfing support at home - the mws attending the birth, bfing supporters also visit if you ask.

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