Preventing pooing. Does an emema actually work?

(5 Posts)
MammaCici Wed 13-Feb-13 16:40:19

I'm expecting my second baby on May 3. With DS1 I pooped several times during delivery. I have a prolapse (rectocele) which I think caused the pooing. To be honest the pooing itself isn't the problem. DS1 got ecoli infections in both eyes soon after birth and I want to do everything I can to prevent this happening again. My caregivers have suggested an enema, which I've agreed to. I'm just wondering now if it will improve the situation at all. I have read somewhere that an enema doesn't prevent pooping during the delivery, it just makes it runnier. Nice.
Does anyone have any experience with an enema during delivery? I know it's not standard proceedure anymore but do my circumstances call for it?

Shelleylouise Wed 13-Feb-13 16:52:16

Hi. I would think that they would give the enema well in advance of needing to push, so that you go to the loo like normal and empty your bowels before you get to that stage. Good luck with the birth.x

thegreylady Wed 13-Feb-13 19:32:31

In my day the standard provedure was to give OBE in early labour.That stood for castor Oil a Bath and an Enema! The idea was that the bowel would be completely empty when you started to push.It certainly worked for me.The oil was disguised in a small glass of orange juice but was still disgusting.

MammaCici Wed 13-Feb-13 19:55:01

I think I'll skip the caster oil! I'm really bad at swallowing horrible stuff. My house is half renovated. We've pulled out the main bathroom so we just have a shower room for the foreseeable future. The hospital I plan to birth in doesn't have baths either. I loved being in a bath during my first labour. I'm hoping second time around will be faster and I won't "need" a bath. I'm hoping a shower & a birth stool (no pun intended!) will work for me this time.
Caster oil, I really don't think I could stomach it.

PeaceAndHope Mon 18-Feb-13 00:19:12

I think we are missing the bigger issue here.

Why have you been advised to go ahead with a vaginal delivery in the first place if you have a rectocele?

Your caregivers shouldn't be suggesting ineffective procedures from the 1950's, they should be giving you ethical advice. In your case, that would be to avoid a vaginal delivery.

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