Who has had a "normal" 37 week+ labour and delivery with no induction or medical intervention but still ended up in SCBU with respiratory problems?

(13 Posts)
ticklebug74 Fri 14-Dec-12 16:50:16

Yes it does but no explanation as to how or what causes it.. He was in scbu for one week.

nappyaddict Tue 11-Dec-12 21:07:32

ticklenug74 What is congenital pneumonia? Does that mean he caught it in utero?

NatashaBee Sat 08-Dec-12 12:02:08

Interesting about GD being linked to poor lung function. I was never diagnosed with GD (was tested regularly as I had PCOS) but DS's blood sugar issues after birth did make me wonder if I had had GD.

NatashaBee Sat 08-Dec-12 12:00:03

Yes. DS was born at 39 weeks with low oxygen levels and unstable blood sugar levels. He was in NICU for a week while they stabilised everything.

ticklebug74 Sat 08-Dec-12 11:48:15

DS1 was 40 week normal delivery and born with congenital pnuemonia.

Nicknamenotavailableeither Fri 07-Dec-12 21:39:27

Me!

mayhew Fri 07-Dec-12 21:33:43

You're welcome.

LeBFG Fri 07-Dec-12 15:53:34

Thanks for the info mayhew - interesting and informative smile.

mayhew Fri 07-Dec-12 11:45:10

It is possible for a baby born vaginally at 37 weeks or later in a low-risk birth to have respiratory problems and need scbu. This usually due to infection or inhaling meconium. A baby born in poor condition due to lack of oxygen for some considerable period may also need respiratory support. There may also be some unanticipated cardiac, lung or medical problem which is only diagnosed after birth.This can happen unexpectedly.

Very occasionally it seems to be prematurity type problems, where the lungs are just not quite mature. This is much more likely if the mother has experienced gestational diabetes or has preexisting diabetes. Babies who experience a high blood sugar prebirth usually grow well (too well sometimes) but have delayed maturity. Clearly if you have undiagnosed high blood sugar then this is a risk.

We know the experience of labour helps to complete lung maturity due to the stress hormones (steroids) the baby produces in response to contractions. We also know that elective section babies are significantly more likely to have respiratory problems if delivered before 39 weeks. That is why the guidelines say to do elCS after 39 weeks now and to give antenatal steroids to the mum if it can't be delayed.

nappyaddict Fri 07-Dec-12 09:27:07

Just curious really. skaen Was yours due to an infection too ? What gestation were they born at?

skaen Thu 06-Dec-12 17:21:58

Me x 2. Why?

flubba Thu 06-Dec-12 16:57:35

Me, but baby was only in for just over 24 hours with an infection that they think he picked up after birth.

Why do you ask? Are you in this situation now?

nappyaddict Thu 06-Dec-12 14:47:42

Thanks smile

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now