Wet nursing

(13 Posts)
DarcyRhone Wed 06-Feb-13 09:49:25

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Would she try a pump?

Was she hinting?

mumnosbest Wed 06-Feb-13 10:17:15

Thats really tough. I think i could nurse anothers baby but would feel uncomfortable with another woman bf my dd.

How old is her baby.

I delivered ds2 at full term and had been feeding ds1 til right up to the birth but my milk took ages to come in despite me expressing frantically.

With my first two it was less than 24 hours. With ds2 it took 3 days.

She has the added complication of preterm delivery.

I would suggest she alternate the pump and hand expressing. It is incredibly stressful and worrying but chances are her milk will come in soon enough

It would be likely to work to trigger milk production, yes, and it would work better than a pump.

But a) that's assuming your baby would latch, which she might not - babies can be particular about breasts/smells/etc. and b) this is entirely down to you. If you are not comfortable with it, then don't go for it.

steppemum Wed 06-Feb-13 10:23:17

To answer your last question first, yes I am sure breastfeeding another baby would stimulate her production.

I think she also could try an electric pump (supposed to be much better than a manual one)
I found expressing nearly impossible, unless baby was feeding on one side while I expressed in other, so I have a lot of sympathy with her.

I wonder if holding and cuddling another baby while expressing would work?

I would feel less uncomfortable about that than about letting my baby be wet nursed by her.

Notanexcitingname Wed 06-Feb-13 10:26:49

As NotQuiteCockney said, wet nursing another infant may well work to bring in milk. Cross nursing is a very personal thing, and you should feel under no pressure.

Is she expressing frequently enough, with a hospital-grade pump?
Lots of good information here

Noodled Wed 06-Feb-13 10:31:51

she needs a double pump of high quality. she needs to pump 8-12 times a day on both sides leaving no gaps longer than 5 hours between pumping sessions. initial volume will be low but will build. mum should aim for 750 mls a day at the end of two weeks. she will be well ahead of her baby's needs but will have a great supply long term and be able to reduce her number of pumping sessions. there is no drug that can substitute for this.

Snusmumriken Wed 06-Feb-13 21:58:15

You would need to be certain that your friend is not HIV positive. Breast milk is a source of transmission for the virus.

nickelbabe Wed 06-Feb-13 22:01:37

I would agree with steppemum.

syggest that to your friend, golding and cuddling another baby whilst expressing.

if it doesn't work then you can consider what happens next, but that might work.

CelticPromise Wed 06-Feb-13 22:09:42

She can, if she's in a supportive unit, hold her own baby or at least be cot side while expressing. Skin to skin with her baby will be good for them both. If her milk hasn't yet come in (and sometimes it takes time after preterm delivery) the small amounts of colostrum she can hand express are vital for baby. Can she ask on the unit for some BF support? I volunteer as a peer supporter in my local unit, and there are specialist nurses.

There is useful info available from bliss.org.uk. If her baby needs more milk than she can provide at this stage donor milk might be available.

I have had a preterm baby and struggled with milk supply. I was eventually prescribed domperidone which helped and I did not suffer any side effects.

Or if you wish, by all means offer your DD!

DarcyRhone Wed 06-Feb-13 23:18:14

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

nickelbabe Thu 07-Feb-13 17:11:38

yes, Celtic has a good point there - it's likely that she's expressing colostrum and therefore assumes she's not getting much, when in fact she is - colostrum is a lot thicker than normal milk and goes further.

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