WWYD re; breastfeeding 'advice'?

(12 Posts)

I went for my post natal check earlier in the week with a practice nurse at my GP surgery, I have a nearly 12 week old DD and I'm currently tandem feeding her and DS who is 23 months.

I've been feeling light headed lately and sometimes feel like my vision has to 'catch up' with my head when I move it (don't know if that makes sense) - I mentioned this as I had the same when DS was little, I said I think it's either DD feeding more because of a growth spurt or perhaps a symptom of anxiety.

Basically she told me I should 'think about' weaning DS because "he's not getting anything nutritionally from it any more anyway, he's just feeding for comfort" I told her I disagreed because when he was ill recently and not even taking water, breastmilk was all he had and he was fine on that for a good week. Even if it were true I also see nothing wrong with him needing it for comfort.

She said "He might not be ready until he's 5" when I said I was going to let him decide when to wean (I don't believe it'll be that long as I will want to stop before then but I don't see why it would be a problem for her) - she also told me my periods wouldn't return until I stopped breastfeeding which clearly isn't true as they came back when DS was 7 months (quite useful in conceiving DD)

The thing is she was really nice and I don't want to get her into trouble.. But it really bothers me that she's giving mums incorrect advice that some of them may act upon.

So.. Do I write to the surgery, maybe enclosing some info on extended breastfeeding from kellymom.com?

Do I speak to the local breastfeeding group leader and ask if they can have a word/arrange for some training or something?

Do I do nothing? Or something else? WWYD?

shelley72 Thu 10-Jan-13 17:00:18

firstly i would have told her to mind her own, but then i am a stroppy mare <not helpful>

it does sound like she does need some training though, or at least some up to date information! lucky for you that you knew she was talking rubbish - the next (new?) mum may not, and may act upon wrong info. i think i would probably at least mention it to the practice manager - that one of their nurses is offering opinions when not wanted and not facts.

I would write a factual letter, enclosing relevant information from KellyMom with the references for that information, and suggest that they ensure that any staff giving out breastfeeding advice are fully qualified and informed before doing so.

There is a lot of bullshit advice handed out about breastfeeding from HCPs, and if we don't say something about it, then we're complicit in that poor advice. It's a bit different when it's a friend or neighbour, but HCPs give advice that is listened to.

EauRouge Thu 10-Jan-13 17:53:54

Yes, a letter outlining what she told you with evidence to refute each point would be helpful. She shouldn't be giving out this sort of misinformation when she's in a position of authority. Kellymom is a great place for getting info, also see if there's an LLL group near you that you can get information leaflets from.

I totally agree that if we do nothing then BF advice will take much longer to improve. It would be great if you could find the time to write a letter. It doesn't have to be long and you could put a note in there for the practice manager to phone you if that would be easier.

Hope you feel better soon!

This is my gut feeling too but she's likely to be the one giving DD her jabs at 12 and 16 weeks, she's bound to know it was me and I'm not sure I can face her if I say something! I wonder if I could do it anonymously?!

Loislane78 Thu 10-Jan-13 18:57:49

Thing I find strange is there is so much info out there on BF, Kellymom and others as have been suggested. What I find odd is that we know this stuff but some HCPs don't?

Now I'm not suggesting doctors spend all day on the internet as I do but if my job was dealing with new mums/babies, I'd be doing my homework.

ZuleikaD Thu 10-Jan-13 19:03:11

I'd ignore it.

It's unbelievable the amount of wrong info/advice that is given out.

The contraception leaflet I got after giving birth said that EBF is a good form of contraception. Wrong. Good job I'd read up about it first online.

My understanding is that breastfeeding is likely to prevent the return of your periods for around 6 months after giving birth providing you feed on demand without restriction. But considering this isn't true for all women and the fact you ovulate before having that first period I don't think it can be considered a reliable form of contraception

EauRouge Thu 10-Jan-13 19:29:01

Exclusive breastfeeding is an effective form of contraception IF certain criteria are met. I would guess the number of mothers meeting the criteria is quite low.

I don't think HCPs are given much training in how breastfeeding works.

EauRouge Thu 10-Jan-13 19:30:45

Can't link now as I'm on my phone but kellymom has some good info on BF as contraception.

needsadviceplease Thu 10-Jan-13 20:39:19

If you want to flag it up, you could always just wait til jabs are out of the way - it's only another month or so.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now