Bread .... Query about adding water.

(15 Posts)
UptoapointLordCopper Sun 20-Jan-13 17:24:59

I make the DL one all the time. Once you know how it works you can time it to work round work IYKWIM. I make the sponge, drop off kids, go to work, then continue after coming back. We've already eaten hundreds of these loaves! Also works with leaving the sponge to ferment overnight.

Waswondering Sun 20-Jan-13 16:51:43

Thanks ... I'm making that DL loaf linked to earlier, but finding it a faff! I'm sure it'll be lovely but there seems a lot of hanging around (fine on a Sunday, but not for a weekday smile). Will trust Kenwood and wet dough from here on, I think.

PolterGoose Sun 20-Jan-13 16:48:15

I make mine in the Kenwood Chef as always make it quite wet and gloopy, doesn't matter, I just take out the dough hook, cover loosely with cling film and leave to rise for hours somewhere cool.

Wet dough plus long rise equals best bread.

Yes, trust a wet dough. Most bread recipes will turn out better if they are wet. Try to resist adding more and more flour. You are changing the recipe if you do that. Then people wonder why it doesnt work grin

Knead with a little oil instead of flour. Thats what Paul Hollywood suggests!

UptoapointLordCopper Sat 19-Jan-13 21:32:24

DL recipes by hand. So little kneading.

Waswondering Sat 19-Jan-13 21:10:56

Interesting ... Not using a breadmaker, just a Kenwood Chef and a 2lb loaf tin smile

MoreBeta Sat 19-Jan-13 21:09:11

Hand made bread is always 'better wetter' IME.

Breadmaker recipes I find do need to be followed to the letter.

Waswondering Sat 19-Jan-13 21:04:20

Ooh, excited by the DL Recipe ... Thank you. Do you do that by hand or sling it in the mixer?

Waswondering Sat 19-Jan-13 21:00:33

Ok, maybe I need to trust wet dough smile. Really enjoying making it.

NannyR Sat 19-Jan-13 20:56:21

I make a lovely focaccia from the Hugh fw everyday cookbook which is really wet and sticky, but turns out well every time. I also made his cheats sourdough bread today which was also quite wet but again turned out to be great.

I use my kenwood chef to do all the mixing and kneading and can do the focaccia without even touching the dough, apart from making the dimples on the top!

I have heard that "the wetter the better" when it comes to bread dough.

UptoapointLordCopper Sat 19-Jan-13 20:55:57

Only ever watched about 10 minutes of GBBO. Seem to make too much of a fuss about baking. grin

UptoapointLordCopper Sat 19-Jan-13 20:54:38

Look at the Basic Technique. But I use the bread recipes all the time. Never failed.

Waswondering Sat 19-Jan-13 20:39:48

Thanks ... Have you a link? I've been using a GBBO recipe but thought the dough should leave your hands clean, not messy.

UptoapointLordCopper Sat 19-Jan-13 19:14:57

I make bread by hand using Dan Lepard's method. No fear of wet and messy dough - very little kneading... And letting the dough rest a lot means the water gets absorbed slowly. Anyway wet dough is better than dry.

Waswondering Sat 19-Jan-13 08:59:29

I've been enjoying making bread recently, which I do in my Kenwood. However ... If I add even close to the amount of water recommended by the recipe, the dough is very wet and messy, needing a lot more flour to make it pliable and knead able without becoming a gooey mess.

I add the water slowly, a bit at a time (it's not sloshed in!).

I'm wondering .... I live in a very soft water area - will that affect what I add?

Just wondered what others experiences were ...

TIA

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