Middle name for Aryan?

(159 Posts)
FreddoPops Sun 09-Feb-14 12:42:16

Prefer a more common and international middle name.

Any ideas?

MrsOakenshield Sun 16-Feb-14 00:47:00

Because Joseph is a name that the vast majority of people associate with the Bible - the father of Jesus. It had that as a very strong association way before Stalin came on the scene. Aryan, as this thread has clearly shown, and which you are clearly ignoring, is a word that most people associate with the hateful ideology that Hitler created, the result of which was the Holocaust.

Stick with AJ. Because your son is not going to thank you for saddling him with this name. Because, sooner or later, he will study the Second World War and will learn about the Aryan Nation. And his class will turn around and look at him. But you know that, and you're happy with that.

If I was the only person on this thread then it wouldn't matter. But I'm not, by a long shot. And, unless you are very ignorant or thick-skinned indeed, you knew damn well what the response would be when you posted.

Mumzy Sat 15-Feb-14 23:25:48

I known someone whose Indian called Swastik. Always thought its a strange name to call your child if you live permanently in the west.

FreddoPops Sat 15-Feb-14 23:18:31

MrsOakenshield Nice try. Somehow I doubt you would be calling people who name their child Joseph ignorant and crass. Why is that?

They're both historically and culturally common names, Aryan was around long before Nazi Germany and the name is not even pronounced the same as the word Aryan.

The only difference is Joseph is historically and culturally common in Europe. This is very much a case of 'it's fine for your country but not in ours'.

And as much as I appreciate the hypocritical and bigoted posts. I'm done with this thread.

For those of you who took the time to respond to my original post. Thank you very much. We decided on Aryan Jai. A.J as a nn. smile

MamaLazarou Sat 15-Feb-14 18:33:21

My mum used to teach an Aryan: blonde hair, blue eyes, the poster child for Hitler Youth.

It's unfortunate for a child to have such sad connotations. If I met a child of Asian appearance with the name, I wouldn't necessarily assume the parents were neo-Nazis, I'd just think it was an unfortunate misunderstanding. For someone to be well aware of the connotations of the name and to use it anyway just shows a barefaced lack of cultural sensitivity.

OP, to answer your question, I'd go with your second-favourite name as middle name, as there's a good chance that your child will turn out to be more respectful of other people's feelings than his parents and will choose to go by his middle name instead.

Lottystar Sat 15-Feb-14 10:04:03

That's a lovely thing for a teacher to say.

Misssss Sat 15-Feb-14 08:39:23

There is an Aryan in the school where I teach. I can't decide if the parents are thick or racists. Either way I die a little every time I see the name written down.

SomethingOnce Thu 13-Feb-14 00:45:11

Lol at all the people who would assume a white supremacist agenda, even for a white child named Aryan. Seriously?

I've never knowingly met a white supremacist (plenty of racists from various ethnicities, but not your actual white supremacists). Not saying there aren't any, but I'm guessing they tend not to draw attention to their views. And that would include not calling a child something stupidly obvious like Aryan. (Stupidly obvious in the context of being a white supremacist).

I don't recall ever meeting an Aryan, but I'd have assumed it was a name with which I was unfamiliar from another culture. It's nice. I agree that Jai works well as a middle name.

Imnotsurehowtogetthisout Wed 12-Feb-14 22:06:31

You must all live in white supremacist parts of england. I would never associate this name with the nazi movement. It is a beautiful name and I have come across this name several times (london). Mostly Iranians.

I also like Aryan Jai OP.

kentishgirl Wed 12-Feb-14 15:07:43

Whatever it means elsewhere, in the UK the poor kid is going to have to deal with everyone getting a frozen WTF? look on their face when he tells them his name.

If it were pronounced air ree an I would be hmm without having previously known the Indian origin (as I didn't before this thread)

If it was pronounced Ay ran or similar I wouldn't think twice but would change the spelling.

Kittykatmacbill Tue 11-Feb-14 23:16:53

Please don't, or if you must spell it differantly.

I would particulary don't if he will have a European surname. Aryan smith (for example) could be more likely to be off putting and mean your child is judged. Life is hard enough without creating extra challenges.

Ps I once worked with a Dutch guy called Coon, lovely guy everytime he met anyone new he apologised for his name....

Alisvolatpropiis Tue 11-Feb-14 20:43:58

Amra

Try reading my entire post before quoting the bits that suit you dear.

Thewhingingdefective Tue 11-Feb-14 20:12:37

I would choose an obviously Indian or Asian middle name rather than a British or International name, so when written down it's clear the name Aryan has nothing to do with Nazism.

I don't know if it's right, but I see the name as Arr- yan, not Air-ee-an.

MrsOakenshield Tue 11-Feb-14 20:00:02

I don't tolerate narrow-minded people very well

I don't tolerate ignorant people very well, either, and to ignore the history and culture of this country, and indeed Europe as a whole when (I assume) you live here is spectacularly crass.

It might interest you to know that when I just tried to google Aryan, using the google search function in the top toolbar (on a Mac) it disappeared - it does that if you search for 'porn' too. It's something that people don't want popping up on their search history.

Food for thought.

Only1scoop Tue 11-Feb-14 17:00:26

Agree Gossamer

But what percentage of children were born with the name Myra pre 1960's. That would give some perspective to your point OP.

mummymeister Tue 11-Feb-14 16:38:00

Freddopops. kids get grief for all sorts of things at school - being too fat, too thin, having red hair, curly hair, straight hair, funny teeth you name it really. if you give them a name with connotations however unintended on your part then this is just something else that they will have to contend with. there are some lovely names out there but for example I wouldn't call my son Richard William (Dick Willy) or my daughter Fanny or anything else that could cause the sort of nasty sniggering and name calling that goes on. by all means call your son this but be aware he might not thank you for it as he grows older. personally, I would avoid anything like this, like the plague.

FloppyPoppyCocky Tue 11-Feb-14 16:35:51

But isn't it pronounced differently anyway? So you would hear the name for weeks probably first in most cases before you saw it written down.

FreddoPops Tue 11-Feb-14 16:29:16

MrsOakenshield 'that it not a lot, in a population of 30 million people that is a microscopically tiny percentage.'

A lot may have been a poor choice of word but my point was that Myra has been used since the 60s (which is what BOF asked).

If there was a child at DD's nursery with this name I would actively avoid the parents, and discourage any friendship, as the obvious inference is that they are nazis idiots and I would not want such people around my child.

Since you're obviously prejudiced (pre-judging us without knowing anything about me or my family or the relevance of the name in relation to us, our history and culture) I wouldn't care if you avoided us, as I don't tolerate narrow-minded people very well.

There is an Aryan in my DD's class at school. His parents are (I think) Hindu or Sikh.

I think it would sound nice with a middle name beginning with one of the softer consonants, perhaps with the letter M or a soft G/J?

Fearing a word/name gives that word/name power. It would be fabulous if lots of boys were called Aryan so it became "just a name", rather than associated with a particularly nasty ideology.

coffeeinbed Tue 11-Feb-14 16:06:58

No one's blaming the child.
Child doesn't choose its name.

Lottystar Tue 11-Feb-14 16:03:32

I wouldn't assume that a child called Aryan had parents who were white supremacists even if he was Caucasian. It's a very old name and why should you have to be Asian for it to be okay? I don't see it being intrinsically linked with the Third Reich.

I could understand the name Adolf would raise eyebrows but I would never blame the child, that's just cruel.

coffeeinbed Tue 11-Feb-14 16:02:48

Some prejudiced and blinkered people around on this thread with no sense of other cultures or world history.

Clearly.

Look Aryan isn't just a name, it's an ideology, it's the whole movement of the race of the Übermensch. Even Adolf is just a nave, as is Josef.

Aryan isn't.
It's the ideal, it's what Hitler strived, lived and breathed for.
If you cannot see how that might offensive, then you're clearly lacking something.

MrsOakenshield Tue 11-Feb-14 15:47:10

yes, I would - I'm not the only one who has said that they would assume the parents were white supremecists (sorry, I just can't seem to spell that right) and obviously I wouldn't want my child hanging around with such people - would you? Of course their child would be fine, until such time he started to repeat his parents' views, but I wouldn't want DD having playdates or being in the home of nazis. Just as if I found out that the parents of any of her little chums were racist, I would back slowly away and not allow DD in their home. Of course, I would not say 'you can't play with so-and-so'.

Obviously, I now realise that in this instance at least one of the parents is Asian, which would explain it and I wouldn't make that assumption - but it would still be a horrible name to give a child.

Amrapaali Tue 11-Feb-14 15:44:51

Agree OP, you don't really need a middle name. Just wondering why you want an international sounding name? Will you be travelling a lot? Changing schools often?

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