irish baby girl names

(59 Posts)
DeborahRoss26 Sun 23-Jun-13 00:24:14

Hi ladies smile im expecting a baby girl at beginning of september. And im thinking of using either Aoife.. Caoimhe.. Saoirse, 1 of those 3. I love irish names my middle names Siobhan. What do you think if those 3 names? And any suggestions?

I adore the name Saoirse. I know in NI it's pronounced Seersha, and in ROI Sersha, either way is lovely.

Caoimhe is pronounced Kee-va? That's very pretty too. Aoife (Ee-fa?) is becoming more well-known, I think one of the Saturdays used that name. They're all nice. Maybe wait till she comes along and see which fits her best? smile

I'd have loved to have used Dervla but DH wasn't keen.

BOF Sun 23-Jun-13 00:38:22

My dd2 is Róisín. I tend to call her Rosie.

burberryqueen Sun 23-Jun-13 01:15:00

Aoife is lovely

onelittlepiglet Sun 23-Jun-13 02:10:10

Love these names. Also Orla and Emer are lovely.

JasmineScentedCandle Sun 23-Jun-13 12:04:24

Really really dislike the name Saoirse. It's the name of a republican local newspaper in Belfast. What about Síofra? not crazy about that for different reasons mind you.

I like Roisín. Aoife is just too popular. It has been popular for a long time an is a very safe, classic choice because of Aoife from the Legend but I am bored with Aoife. It's like Kate I guess it just never goes away.

Caoimhe is ok. It is a pretty sound but everybody would struggle with spelling.

My favourite Irish girls names are Maeve, Orla, Clodagh.

As your middle name is Siobhan, what about Siún for your baby?

Bearandcub Sun 23-Jun-13 12:05:48

Clodagh

forgetmenots Sun 23-Jun-13 13:15:18

Love these, also (can't type fadas)
Orla
Fionnuala (Nuala)
Siun
Roisin
Ailbhe
Aisling

forgetmenots Sun 23-Jun-13 13:18:43

X post!

Alisvolatpropiis Sun 23-Jun-13 13:25:12

I love Aoife

burberryqueen Tue 25-Jun-13 08:46:14

agree about 'Saoirse' i think it was a republican group in London too.

Fantail Tue 25-Jun-13 08:56:44

DD was almost Saoirse, but in the end we went for a much more conventional name.

As long as you at aware of the political connection to the name and are prepared to justify the use then I think go ahead. A lot of people will not be aware but for some it will cut to the bone. Similar to the use of Jemima in the USA.

TVTonight Tue 25-Jun-13 10:35:30

What about Jemima in USA?

How about Caoilfhionn (Keelin)
Love Fionnoula, Aisling Siún

Fantail Tue 25-Jun-13 11:05:57

It is avoided because of its associations with slavery. "Aunt Jemima" is the equivalent of "Uncle Tom"

Turniptwirl Tue 25-Jun-13 11:54:50

I love the name Saoirse and have spent time living in the Republic of Ireland and never heard of any negative associations of it. Depends where you live I guess, Northern Ireland may be more aware of such things.

If you live in mainland uk then a popular Irish name like Aoife may well be easier than a less well known one.

BeaWheesht Tue 25-Jun-13 11:58:48

I like Ailish and Mairead

dufflefluffle Tue 25-Jun-13 12:07:23

Maeve!
I hate any of those Caoimhe, Caoilfhinn names - they sound so whiney (or maybe the Caoimhe's I knew were just whiney)
Cara
Aoife is lovely and spelling could even be phonetic (Efa) if she gets fed up spelling it out for people.
I think Roisin is too popular - there must be 10 in our local school of 200 pupils.
Aine (Awyna)

RaisingHooligirls Tue 25-Jun-13 12:18:27

I'm in Dublin and I wouldn't consider Saoirse for reasons mentioned above.

squoosh Tue 25-Jun-13 12:27:30

Interesting, I don't associate Saoirse with Republicanism at all. I doubt many people who use the name do anymore either. I think of a more hippyish type of 'freedom'! To me it's a very middle class Irish name.

I pronounce it sare-sha, although seer-sha and ser-sha are legit too.

Witchesbrewandbiscuits Tue 25-Jun-13 16:53:12

love love love Roisin!

DramaAlpaca Tue 25-Jun-13 17:01:18

I'm in the mid-west of Ireland & you'd be looked at sideways for using Saoirse (which is pronounced sare-sha here too) because of the above mentioned reasons.

When I first lived here and was unaware of how Irish names are pronounced I misheard someone's daughter's name as Saoirse when it was actually Sorcha. I got a very stern correction & an explanation as to why her daughter was very definitely not called Saoirse!

I actually think it's a beautiful name.

Caoimhe is lovely too. It's pronounced Queeva where I live, rather than Keeva.

Aoife is my favourite Irish girl's name, and was on the list if I'd had a DD.

Alisvolatpropiis Tue 25-Jun-13 17:25:31

duffle I thought Aoife could be spelled phonetically as Efa,however it was pointed out to me it's a Welsh name pronounced Air-va (roughly).

How confusing!

LucySnoweShouldRelax Tue 25-Jun-13 17:26:36

I'm Irish, living in London, as are a lot of Irish young people of my generation. My first name is not Irish, but a lot of my friends living here are middle-class Dubliners with names of the Caoilfhionn variety. I really do thank the stars that my parents didn't burden me with a name that I have to explain every single time a stranger asks, and that realistically, no one can pronounce. My friends have fake English names that they use when they're short of time.

Personally, I prefer names like Una, Mary, Bridie, Kitty, Maud, Sadie (BOD shout-out there). I realise that these names aren't everyone's cup of tea, and aren't exclusively Irish, but they're the names of my grandmothers' generation, and are, for me, a far stronger link to my Irish heritage than the Lasairfhionas of this world.

All that said, I do like Naoise ('Neesha') or Banbha ('Banva')

squoosh Tue 25-Jun-13 17:34:36

I met a Lasairfhiona recently! That's one tricky mo-fo of a name to be stuck with, even in Ireland.

I'm a bit blah about Irish names, they're so unexotic to me but I can appreciate that people from other countries see them as fresh.

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