Is it honestly possibly to learn to use a sewing machine having never,ever used one before?

(22 Posts)
AnyaKnowIt Wed 31-Jul-13 14:16:29

glad to hear that op, my machine has arrived today

momnipotent Wed 31-Jul-13 02:10:29

Yikes, should rea the thread completely first!

Well done OP, glad to hear you are havng fun!

momnipotent Wed 31-Jul-13 02:07:34

Yes, its possible! I bought some cheap fabric and practiced things like sewing in a straight line, sewing two pieces together, hems, etc. Then I made lined curtains for every room in the house and duvet covers for the kids. smile

NoComet Wed 31-Jul-13 02:00:36

grin My mum always sewed, so I've never understood why people think of sewing machines as scary.

DD1 was only saying tonight that she'd sorted out half her class who seem determined not learn to follow the very simple instructions and she couldn't understand the fuss.

I haven't done much sewing, recently and it's a very long time since I showed her.

It really is just a matter of having the confidence to try.

Now if you like, OP, you can have a go at threading my four thread overlocker!

Cherryberries Wed 31-Jul-13 01:35:45

Hi everyone am just popping back to say that six weeks later I am truly flying it with my sewing machine..I absolutely love it and have done lots of simple alterations on it.I wouldnt say they are very professionally done but they look good which is what counts I guess.
I was terrified of it to begin with but once I got the hang of it I was fine.I cannot believe how easy it is to do your own alterations etc.
Thanks to everyone for all the encouragement.To anyone else out there thinking about learning to use a machine..yes definitely do it.If I can do it anyone cansmile.

Twunk Fri 14-Jun-13 15:08:44

You've got the machine! I got a Lidl one to start with - got my friend to show me how to thread up etc then just got on with it. A year later I started selling the things I make (having got a much better machine!). Never thought I'd be someone that sews, but I think that's what your mid-30s do to you. Good luck and enjoy!

Cherryberries Thu 13-Jun-13 13:23:31

Thanks everyone..I am feeling much more positive now.I have bitten the bullet and bought a Brother LS15 fairly basic machine.It has good online reviews and has 15 stitches,zig-zag,zipper,buttonhole etc so is nice and simple.I might have a go at the weekend.Thanks for all the encouragement everyonesmile.I will let ye know how it goes.

pootlebug Wed 12-Jun-13 21:17:46

Yes. I did!

Faff around sewing randomly on any old bit of fabric. Then a Mors Bag www.morsbags.com/html/patterns.html is a good first project - easy and quick and useful too

KittensoftPuppydog Wed 12-Jun-13 21:13:44

Should say that the quilting foot is extra.

KittensoftPuppydog Wed 12-Jun-13 21:10:44

I got the John Lewis machine. It's lovely. 100 quid and does everything I need. Best part is the guide book is tiny and really easy to use.
I'm now making quilts, dresses, cushions.
I had some sewing lessons but working the machine was no problem at all. I thought I was phobic. Really scared of them. Now wish I'd started earlier.

MiaowTheCat Wed 12-Jun-13 19:18:52

Oh and keep the fact you know one end of a needle from the other very very secret or you'll end up doing everyone's play costumes, "I just need this hemming" and whatever else!

MiaowTheCat Wed 12-Jun-13 19:17:58

Course it is! Otherwise how would anyone ever get started on one?!

Hardest bit is learning how to thread your own individual machine (ie read the manual) - try things out on scrap fabric and see if the stitch length and type is what you're after and fiddle away like that.

Dunelm Mill usually have decent starter machines - mine's a Janome that I think came from there (I got it and a huge box of bits of remnant trim and fabric and stuff for an Xmas prezzie one year).

Oblongata Wed 12-Jun-13 17:44:26

It is possible to do almost anything, having never, ever done it before. Provided you've got some way of learning, and don't get immediately knocked back by messing up the first few times.

Read the manual, thread the machine, sew some lines on a big bit of scrap fabric. Then read the manual again and see if you need to adjust the tension of the thread. Practise some more.

There are LOADS of great tutorials and photos online for you to shamelessly copy grin

fossil971 Wed 12-Jun-13 17:38:32

Probably start with some scrap fabric - an old tea towel, anything like that. Start by trying out all the stitches, then sewing some seams and hems and getting used to the speed and feel of the machine, going round curves, lining up the fabric edge to the right guideline. This should take about half an hour and then if you feel you have got the hang of it you can get started.

Dutchoma Wed 12-Jun-13 10:06:46

Just go to a proper sewing machine shop if you can and get them to help you set it up. It may be slightly more expensive than buying one from Aldi or Amazon, but you get a lot more help from a proper shop.

Naoko Wed 12-Jun-13 10:06:29

Make a Thing! Doesn't really matter what, and it might come out a bit wonky but you'll feel really clever when it's done, and learn loads in the process.

Cherryberries Wed 12-Jun-13 00:27:39

Ooh thanks,that is encouraging to hear! How is it best to start once I have practised setting up the machine ? Do I just get some fabric scraps and start practicing various stitches or do I start by attempting something like a hanky or cushion cover?

Definitely! I started sewing about four years ago after having never sewn a thing in my life. I used tutorials I found on blogs and just generally found my own way through many pitfalls and mistakes. Now I'm not bad at all (although did insert my needle backwards the other day and spent an hour trying to figure out why the thread was snapping! blush ) once you give it a try you realise it's pretty straightforward really, and there's an answer to everything on Google :D

SamsGoldilocks Wed 12-Jun-13 00:02:00

Yes, I bought a sewing machine a year ago having never ever even touched one. I've made some really lovely things. Get a nice book to help with the language, look on pinterest for some nice tutorials for stuff and you'll be running up cushions and pillowcase dresses and wishing you had an enormous fabric stash

fossil971 Tue 11-Jun-13 23:47:39

I would say

Read the instructions vv carefully for threading up etc
Have a good sewing book or a magazine
Make the most of youtube
Look at some inspiring sewing blogs!

It's possible to teach yourself all kinds of craft things, I'm mostly self taught although that was when I was younger and my brain functioned better grin. Most sewing patterns and projects have pretty detailed instructions so it's not as if you are faced with a pile of fabric and have to figure it all out yourself.

Definitely have a go!

Naoko Tue 11-Jun-13 23:40:29

I've started learning to sew over the last six months with no more help than my friend occasionally glancing over from the other side of the room and going 'no, you're holding that upside down', pointing me in the right direction with the stuff I was trying to make, and youtube videos. I'd say it's certainly possible! I'm getting better all the time, I've bought my own machine now and I'm gaining confidence to try stuff.

Cherryberries Tue 11-Jun-13 23:31:57

I would love to teach myself to use a sewing machine for things like alterations,curtains etc. Is this realistically possible if I just buy a good,basic machine and watch a few tutorials on you tube and follow instructions and generally feel my way? Or am I deluding myself? Honestly?

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