to think the child actors/tresses on soaps must be totally fucked up?

(34 Posts)
UseHerName Fri 10-May-13 23:24:21

i mean totally fucked up

think amy in tonight's eastenders? 'the bad man' and the long list of other random people?

the fighting while they're in the arms of other actors?

how does that work then?

PaWithABra Fri 10-May-13 23:29:02

I think that female actors prefer to be called 'actors' these days. I could be wrong though

UseHerName Fri 10-May-13 23:38:53

really? all of them? every single one?

i was using both terms to account for difference and the fact they are children and generally not self-defined, so by the time they can define themselves 'actress' might have fallen back into favour what with language being an ever shifting medium

soooo....back to any thoughts on how this might fuck up 'children-who-are-in-soaps'

for lack of a better phrase

ArmyOfPenguins Fri 10-May-13 23:40:45

I've been worried about Amy in Eastenders for ages!

LittleNutTree Fri 10-May-13 23:41:55

I sometimes wonder this about kids who are in horror films and the like, especially in the cases when they aren't even able to see the film themselves because of the age cert! confused

UseHerName Fri 10-May-13 23:42:30

army did you see tonight's??

manicinsomniac Fri 10-May-13 23:43:02

why would you call an actress an actor? I'm a performing arts teacher and have never come across this. Call everyone actors and you have to specify gender along with it. The Oscars etc still have best supporting actress and all that right?

Anyway, I think YABU OP - children in the performing world are very carefully guided and educated about what they are exposed to and they know it isn't real. In some situations they may become more worldly wise and exposed to things that it would be better if they hadn't been but careful handling is the key.

Some end up fucked up I know - but I think this is down to individual upbringing and personality rather than what they are exposed to.

Haven't seen Eastenders tonight but in alot of scenes you can tell by the way the filming is 'cut' that the scene with the child is done independantly and 'spliced' in.

I can't abide the wooden acting of some of the children (and yes I know they are only children ) but it doesn't add to the scene at all.

ArmyOfPenguins Fri 10-May-13 23:45:35

No, I haven't seen it yet. I suppose I am about to get more worried?

UseHerName Fri 10-May-13 23:47:35

that's really interesting insominac

some of the domestic dispute scenes reminded me of some of the domestic rows that my dd witnessed at amy's age-are the children taught to differentiate/is it presented to them as a game??

amy is maybe 3/4 for those who dont watch

UseHerName Fri 10-May-13 23:52:01

and of course there's splicing-esp evident when there's a baby crying

FrogInABog Fri 10-May-13 23:53:21

Remember they are on a set, surrounded by cameras, in a cut out room with loads of people nearby most likely laughing and joking between scenes, and their parents there often. Things stopping and starting while being filmed and knowing the.actors out of character will also mean it won't seem at all real.

KobayashiMaru Fri 10-May-13 23:55:08

Stop watching that shit and eventually there won't be any actors of any kind needed for soaps.Do us all a favour.

UseHerName Fri 10-May-13 23:56:25

insightful contribution there maru grin

PaWithABra Fri 10-May-13 23:56:54

use her name

as a 'performing arts teacher' you really ought to be up to speed.

a quick google brings up many discussions on the issue.

eg

http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=607233

PaWithABra Fri 10-May-13 23:59:27

the gaurdian even

http://www.guardian.co.uk/theobserver/2011/sep/25/readers-editor-actor-or-actress

UseHerName Sat 11-May-13 00:01:46

pawithabra-im not a performing arts teacher-insomniac is...

grin

Fluffypinkcoat Sat 11-May-13 00:01:59

I wondered this the other night when Janine was holding Scarlett and saying "there! See how much your daddy doesn't love you?" or whatever she said. What if the baby thinks she means it? :'(

Booyhoo Sat 11-May-13 00:02:09

call actors actors because why do you need to specify gender?

as for best actor/best actress? why 2 awards? (more revenue i suppose)

why not just best actor? and let it be decided upon talent not gender.

Lj8893 Sat 11-May-13 00:03:13

Hmm, I can see why some may prefer to be called an actor but I would call myself an actress (never really thought about calling myself an actor!)

UseHerName Sat 11-May-13 00:04:59

yes fluffy!!! just that sort of thing

PaWithABra Sat 11-May-13 00:06:30

soz use her name..

can read and i have been drinking

AgnesBligg Sat 11-May-13 00:06:59

the actors I know prefer 'actor'.

I like seeing the very small ones staring somewhere just left of camera where clearly mummy is standing. Or the gormless starey-eyed ones that have 'screaming tot' soundtrack.

I love Bian'a's daughter.

UseHerName Sat 11-May-13 00:08:16

me too bra-it's a concentrated effort to type on the old phone with fat tipsy fingers grin

MrsLion Sat 11-May-13 07:15:23

One of my friends was a well known child actor- she's not fucked up at all. Now a mum, 3 young children, lovely dh. She is very driven and extremely ambitious. Now a solicitor, but no more fucked up than anyone else.

I did read somewhere trashy that the little girl who was in the Poltergeist films (I'm showing my age) needed psychological treatment after those movies...

turkeyboots Sat 11-May-13 07:20:49

Read an article about the girl who plays Sally Draper in Mad Men. She is totally protected from anything unsuitable appearntly and has never seen the show apart from her scenes.

One of my kids has been in a few professional adult-rated stage plays. Much to his brother's annoyance as I never let him see him. The production companies are careful about what he sees - so any violence i is an absolute no-no for example. The industry is rightly very heavily regulated for children. I think a larger danger for kids on TV/in films would be becoming well known/famous/recognisable & all the issues that go with that rather than taking part & acting on a highly regulated set.

SilveryMoon Sat 11-May-13 07:32:14

Fluffy That thought ran through my mind too sad

Homebird8 Sat 11-May-13 07:53:44

DS2 (8) recently played Sorrow in Madame Butterfly. The company was very careful to work with me so that he had the plot explained to give him some background to the emotion and the suicide at the end. In many productions Sorrow is blindfolded at this point but in this one he was aware of the final act of despair.

We had a very interesting conversation about social opinion, culture, history, honour, and despair. He was fine about it although processing it obviously weighed heavily on his mind as he mentioned it in interview with the paper.

I think that he'll be fine because we can talk about stuff as it comes up. There are loads of children exposed to dreadful scenes as a reality in their lives. I'm more worried about them than the ones who are carefully protected from parts of a written drama they don't need to witness.

SoupDragon Sat 11-May-13 07:58:29

You realise that Scarlett is a baby of about 6 months old don't you?

SilveryMoon Sat 11-May-13 08:08:52

So, you'd say something like that to a 6mo? I know what you are hinting at, that the baby is too young, doesn't understand etc etc but it made me feel uncomfortable

Was she definitely holding a baby for any shouted vi

Oh FFS - was she definitely holding a baby for any shouted violent type bits (& not a doll). I don't watch eastenders but would have thought they'd cut scenes. My son's experience has always been that they are very careful - would be surprised if TV wasn't the same.

I have had misgivings about a few of the scenes in EastEnders, last night's one with Kat and Amy was unnecessary and cut have been shot differently. They should have had Kat say the line "the bad man has gone" and then focused on Amy, so she didn't have to be there as Kat was saying the lines, it's a lazy way of filming that could spark nightmares. Slightly older children who understand acting and media productions, are different, but for under 3 year olds there should be stricter guidelines. Some of the things said would be classed as emotionally abusive, if said during contact, for example, or in the home.

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