Both schools and nursery fucking closed because of 2 inches of fucking snow!

(72 Posts)
SickOfBeingSoScared Wed 05-Dec-12 10:49:50

EXCUSE MY LANGUAGE. I am ranting!!

Neither school informed parents until after 8.15am when I had already left home early to get there on time. Therefore I wasted over an hour and a half as the traffic was ridiculous, we are talking moving at 3mph ffs. What is wrong with people that they cannot drive in a bit of slush!??

It snowed between 5.00 and 6.00am (I was up with DS3 watching it [anger]) not icy just slush. Has not snowed since and it immediately started thawing. The school no more than half a mile away from the DSs is open as usual hmm.

Been told by DS3's nursery which he attends 3 afternoons a week and which I scrape the money together for, that they are only open to 'working parents' as they don't have enough staff and parents who get the funded hours or who are not going to work cannot take their DC in but I still have to pay for the session anyway! They can fuck right off! Again the nursery less than a mile away from that one is fully open!

AIBU to think the staff probably can't be arsed to go in and I should not have to pay for that?

Really fuming as I had an important appointment this afternoon which I now have to cancel!!

SickOfBeingSoScared Wed 05-Dec-12 10:51:23

It snowed between 5.00 and 6.00am (I was up with DS3 watching it angry as he had me up at 4.30am!)

kilmuir Wed 05-Dec-12 10:52:58

Ridiculous isn't it

BarryShitpeas Wed 05-Dec-12 10:54:45

I would take your son to nursery.

threesocksfullofchocs Wed 05-Dec-12 10:55:53

yanbu to be angry that the nursery are discriminating

RooneyMara Wed 05-Dec-12 10:55:54

I very much doubt it's a case of 'can't be bothered'

It's really dreadful trying to drive in it this morning - not so much the slow people as the nutters trying to go at a normal speed - but then we've had a LOT and it settled and got icy very fast here.

I expect everyone is doing their best but it does cause hassle and communication breakdown.

Calm down...you're not going to make it any better by losing the plot smile

SickOfBeingSoScared Wed 05-Dec-12 10:57:29

It is now bright sun and the snow is melting fast!

teaguzzler Wed 05-Dec-12 11:00:17

I know schools often close because on snowy days lots of parents keep their children at home and ofsted do not take this into account when analysing attendance figures. Completely agree that closing seems to be the default response of some schools though. They can't possibly turn your dc away then charge you for it surely!

RooneyMara Wed 05-Dec-12 11:00:35

Well lucky you! Can you ring them and ask if it's Ok to bring in your child now?

I imagine they have staff that can't get in because it's worse in outlying areas, or something. and they may not be allowed to have that many children if the ratios are up iyswim

Sorry you are being very unreasonable. Just a little inconvenience for you isn't it? Imagine those who aren't going to get paid today because school is closed and they can't get alternative childcare?

OutragedAtThePriceOfFreddos Wed 05-Dec-12 11:08:49

YABU about the school, but not about the nursery.

It's outrageous that they are able to open but are going to pick and choose which parents to provide for and then still charge you! Surely if you have an important meeting, you count as a parent who is working? It would probably make no difference if you still have your other child at home, but still, i think the nursery are behaving appallingly. Either way, you shouldn't have to pay for a service they are not providing, they are free to tell their staff they won't be paid if they don't turn up due to snow.

What Outraged said

By this afternoon the nursery staff should have been able to get in, except those with school children at home. I would definitely be taking the little one to nursery.

ooer Wed 05-Dec-12 11:12:36

Is not the real problem that our economic set-up seems to require us to drive? Big distances to get to work, big distances to get to school. A little bit of snow, and, kaput!

YANBU to be annoyed and YADNBU about the nursery. Do you have a working OH? Take em in on his ticket!

IvanaHumpalot Wed 05-Dec-12 11:20:07

I would challenge the nursery with regards to not allowing the children of non-working carers and funded places in today.

If you self fund but don't work, you have paid for a service which you are not getting. Ask to see the nursery policy which stipulates the 'hierachy' of payments from types of parents. I doubt there is one and even if they do have this I doubt it could be enforced. Either the nursery is open to all or closed.

If you are funded, ask to see the regulations/section of legislation which refers to this circumstance. Again, I doubt this exists.

Do this in writing. It is not for the parents to sort out the staffing levels for the children, which I presume is the problem.

FlaminNoraImPregnantPanda Wed 05-Dec-12 11:26:56

Driving in winter conditions with summer tyres is incredibly dangerous. I wouldn't even attempt it. It's like going ice-skating in your slippers: madness. So on that basis YABU.

AlienRefluxLooksLikeSnow Wed 05-Dec-12 11:29:01

The school should have rang before 8.15

SickOfBeingSoScared Wed 05-Dec-12 11:29:40

That is what has outraged me, the fact the nursery insisted I still had to pay. I doubt they will pay staff who can't get in. I shall speak to them about it tomorrow.

OneToddlingTerror I wish I was in a position where I had a job that I had to take unpaid time off, from I really do! One of the reason's I put DS in nursery was so I could attend interviews and study at home to increase my chances of getting a job.

If the nursery cannot provide your child care then you should not be charged. It's their operating decision that means your DC cannot attend, not your issue and therefore you shouldn't pay.

RooneyMara Wed 05-Dec-12 11:31:52

Yes I agree totally that you should not have to pay but it always makes the best of situations if you imagine the other people concerned are trying their best

rather than getting yourself into a state and convinced they are out to get you by being lazy, stupid etc

they probably just cobbled together something on the spur of the moment and realise it's not ideal

I wouldn't pay though if it wasn't being provided.

GhoulWithADragonTattoo Wed 05-Dec-12 11:37:15

YANBU - we have a similar amount of snow to you and my DD is at school and DS is at nursery. It looked like most of DD's class were already there when we arrived. I would be especially cross about the nursery and would refuse to pay for the session or take DC anyway.

RooneyMara Wed 05-Dec-12 11:41:27

But they might not have the required number of staff so it wouldn't be safe,

best just not to pay I think
or call and ask if there is room for her

GreenEggsAndNichts Wed 05-Dec-12 11:45:01

You should not have to pay for a service you are not receiving. They are the ones unable to provide the service. Fair enough if staff haven't been able to make it in (tbf, most staff at my son's nursery have children his age or older, so if the local schools are closed they are possibly forced to take the day off, hence the shortage). Definitely speak to them about it. At the very least, perhaps they'll take him on a different afternoon, or some other arrangement which would make it so that you're making use of the hours you've paid for.

We3bunniesOfOrientAre Wed 05-Dec-12 11:48:31

Well if you are preparing for job interviews / applying then that is working. I have worked all morning at home while ds was in preschool, it is none of their business though what sort of work you are doing. If they say that you have your other dc so you can't work tell them that the older dc can be plonked in front of a DVD, but you need someone to take the younger one, and as you are PAYING them, they are the ones who will take them.

wonkylegs Wed 05-Dec-12 11:49:21

That's ridiculous. When we had several feet of snow two years ago DS's nursery stayed open for the whole period bar 2 days. Most of the schools stayed open and only closed if there was an issue such as the boiler broke down (it was -12)
I drove to work every day.
Driving in a few inches of snow is not difficult if you drive appropriately to the conditions.

OutragedAtThePriceOfFreddos Wed 05-Dec-12 11:59:25

If they haven't got the staff then I think it would be fine for them to appeal to parents to keep children at home if hey possibly can, or at least bring them in later in the day. But they can't tell parents that their custom only matters if they are going to do paid work.

RooneyMara Wed 05-Dec-12 12:04:26

Wonky I disagree unless you mean, have a vehicle suitable for the conditions.

I drove very very carefully this morning - someone else's child in my car, too - and we made it, just, but the wheels kept spinning on the more covered roads and when we got to the car park, the brakes failed.

I'm not sure how exactly I could have made this not happen! (tell me if there is a technique)

I was doing about 5mph thank God and we did stop but it was frightening

SickOfBeingSoScared Wed 05-Dec-12 12:05:29

Just spoke to nursery again and they said if I take him, they will turn us away but will still have to pay! They will also be closing early anyway due to the dangerous roads - err, snow has stopped and is melting! No more is forecast today.

Am I really being UR? They seem to think I am!

SickOfBeingSoScared Wed 05-Dec-12 12:09:44

Other people in the area have been flabbergasted (like me) of the traffic chaos this morning due to a little bit of snow. The roads were wet but clear on the way back from the failed school drop off but people were still driving at 3mph!

RooneyMara Wed 05-Dec-12 12:11:29

They probably were driving at the speed they judged as safe. Would you rather they went faster even if it meant they felt out of control of their car?

btw yanbu if the nursery still insist you pay - they're out of order.

Aboutlastnight Wed 05-Dec-12 12:12:58

We had snow three days ago in Scotkand and everything just went on as usual.
Would be very angry if school closed due to three inches of snow.

CelineMcBean Wed 05-Dec-12 12:16:09

They cannot turn you away and expect to be paid - that is extremely unreasonable.

You have a contract whereby they provide a service and you pay them. No service where they have declined to provide the service is a breach of the contract and you should not have to pay.

I would not discuss it with them. I would tell them calmly (and backed up in writing) that you will NOT be paying for the time they declined to provide the service to you because you are not working and that if they want paying for the time they can take you to court... but that if they do that you will make a counter action for indirect sex discrimination as per the Equality Act 2010.

<<It could be argued as indirect sex discrimination because more women then men are non-working parents. Not that you'd bother actually taking that further but you'd just let them know you could.>>

wonkylegs Wed 05-Dec-12 13:31:35

Rooney there is a bit of a knack to driving in snow and some cars are better than others - BMWs are abysmal as they are rear wheel drive but my little toyota Yaris is fab (small wheels, light car) and our big Audi is ok.
The first year I drove on snow I was terrified but the more you do it the better you get at it (side effect of living in Newcastle is that over the years we've had a fair amount of it)
There are some tips on how to drive in snow here:
news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8443690.stm

ENormaSnob Wed 05-Dec-12 14:21:58

The nursery issue is farcical.

I would be furious.

I'm pretty certain that we have to pay for snow days at our nursery and they do then pay the staff. However I wouldn't be happy to pay for a day where they decided which children they would take - Celine McBean's response is spot on.

LemonBreeland Wed 05-Dec-12 14:41:37

The nursery are unbelievable to tell someone that their child cannot come to nursery but they must still pay. How do they think they can get away with that? Definitely put it in writing.

moonstorm Wed 05-Dec-12 14:49:18

Why can't people drive in the snow? Because they are driving on summer tyres. Winter tyres should be made the law.

YABU to judge others (YANBU about the nursery unless they are understaffed and taking in all children would have safety issues for the children).

You don't know what the weather is like where the teachers work. I drive 20 miles to work - my place of work has much worse weather that at home due to the way the land lies. Anyone travelling in the opposite direction to me might just stay at home. I am often allowed to leave early in bad weather.

I wouldn't pay the nursery for the days they were open but turned you away.

RooneyMara Wed 05-Dec-12 16:32:53

Thanks for the link, Wonky...I already do the things on their list but it's good to know I'm getting it right!

We do have summer tyres, the thing is, it barely ever snows here, so is it worth making winter tyres the law?

I think this is the problem - we're just not really set up for these sort of conditions, while other countries such as Sweden etc are better prepared because they have so much snow and have no choice.

healstorturepeople Wed 05-Dec-12 16:57:33

I taught for nearly a decade and only had 1 day where my school was closed for snow.
I remember one day very clearly. I was driving to school in horrible conditions. I was only going about 25-30 mph, the same as everyone on the duel carriageway when I suddenly skidded to the other side of the road. I hit the barrier and a car ran into the back of me. I wasn't hurt as the speeds were slow but I was shocked and in tears. I got to school and had to teach the day as normal. I was shaking and teary for most of the morning. Many teachers were coming from much further and more rural locations than me. They had horrendous journeys. Later that day a child slipped moving between our two buildings and broke his ankle.

Schools close for numerous reasons. Primarily because of safety for the children and for staff. Schools now have more concerns about parents putting in a claim if their child hurts themselves on schools property. It is also more difficult for school dinners to arrive if they are externally provided. The heating in schools is often old and tends to pack up at the slightest of cold temperatures. There is rarely money to change the whole heating system so repairs work temporarily but not forever. If some staff can't make it then the numbers of children for each teacher becomes unworkable and no work would get done anyway. Also believe it or not we get parents who moan that the school isn't closed as well as those who moan because it is. No school can win! Some parents want their children safe at home in these kind of conditions, I can understand that. A lot of parents work and finding care at short notice is difficult, I can understand that too. A decision to close isn't made lightly. It is also often made by the headteacher who may or may not live anywhere near the school so analysing the local road conditions and school premises at 7am in the morning may not be possible for him/her.

Please don't play the 'lazy' school card. All the teachers I know (and I know lots!) are extremely dedicated and will try to get into school if at all possible. One teacher I knew drove 3.5 hours there and 3.5 hours back every day for a week in the snow (normal journey time just over an hour but the road conditions meant a much longer journey). Another teacher paid for local b&b for 2 weeks as she lived on rural roads 50 minutes away and would have been unable to get into school.

dribbleface Wed 05-Dec-12 17:01:15

Not sure about your nursery staff being too lazy to bother hmm but all mine got in, albeit late. We didn't open until 9 am rather than 7.30 am. Took staff on average 2.5 hours to get here.

All my staff bar 1 come from a far distance, quality staff are hard to get!

SomeTiggyPudding Wed 05-Dec-12 17:28:18

"Been told by DS3's nursery...
..don't have enough staff...
...They can fuck right off! Again the nursery less than a mile away from that one is fully open!

AIBU to think the staff probably can't be arsed to go in and I should not have to pay for that?"

The nursery should not charge you. They surely can't legally charge you. If they can't provide the service they can't charge for it.

The whole staff not getting in while parents can is a thing that crops up quite often in nurseries. To put it in a way you'll understand: Parents with their fucking 4x4 off road trucks can get in fine but the staff getting £2.65 an hour for trainees and motherfucking minimum wage for qualified staff have to cunting well drive felching Micras or arse fisting well take buses or rely on spacedocking lifts!

ChristmasIsForPlutocrats Wed 05-Dec-12 18:38:22

* have to cunting well drive felching Micras or arse fisting well take buses or rely on spacedocking lifts!*

grin

On a more serious note, OP, why not try reposting this in Legal, to give you some background before tomorrow?

moonstorm Wed 05-Dec-12 22:31:34

Winter tyres are not just for the snow.

The composistion of the rubber is different and they perform better when the temperature is under about 7 degrees. Summer tyres go hard in cold weather, winter tyres remain 'softer'.

They perform better on cold weather and in the wet and on ice.

It's not just about snow. (But if it were, I would still argue for them for safety on those few occasions - I can't remember when it hasn't snowed at some point.)

RooneyMara Thu 06-Dec-12 06:03:43

Oh Ok - that makes sense then. I had no idea - thanks for explaining. (don't think we could afford them though!)

Sirzy Thu 06-Dec-12 06:55:50

Nowhere should need to close because of 2 inches of snow. It is madness how the country grinds to a halt at the first sign of a snowflake.

CouthyMowEatingBraiiiiinz Thu 06-Dec-12 07:12:07

Yesterday I got my DC's to school, albeit 20 minutes late (traffic was at a crawl here and there was only 1/2 an inch of snow, I mean WTF?!)

There were teachers arriving after us!

Scotland carries on with 6+ inches of snow, why can't the SE cope with a slight dusting?

If my DS2 and me didn't have disabilities that made the walk impossible, we could have walked quicker. Most people did!

One teacher was on the bus with us, and had left her house at 7am and was still 20 minutes late.

ceeveebee Thu 06-Dec-12 07:32:11

What I don't really understand is why schools and nurseries close when it snows, but all the offices, shops, restauants and factories manage to stay open. Everyone else manages to get to work somehow but not teachers or nursery assistants.

jamdonut Thu 06-Dec-12 07:51:46

shops dont have to fulfill ratios of adults to children. 3 or 4 members of staff not making it in can make it unsafe to operate.

Our school is by the sea, and sometimes we hardly have any snow, but the majority of our staff live inland in rural areas and snowfall is usuall far heavier and makes roads impossible to pass. It causes panic if snow starts during a school day, because a lot of staff are worried if they are actually gooing to get home to their families. Me...I live a 15 minute walk away from school ,so it doesn't affect me.

Schools have to make last minute decisions to close,depending on whether they feel it is safe . I always look on-line at the schools web-site,or council web-site or twitter to see if my own children's school is closing. (Yes, they have a Twitter account!)

jamdonut Thu 06-Dec-12 07:53:56

By the way...your nursery has chosen not to provide you with a service, therefore, they should not be charging you. That is shocking.

TheDoctrineOfSnatch Thu 06-Dec-12 07:59:53

Nursery can charge if it is in their t&c's.

They almost certainly have some but not all staff so can't meet ratios if all children come. All parents at my daycare work so they give priority to children of key workers eg nurses

The t&c are more likely to refer to the nursery closing, not eing short staffed and picking which children they take.

Alibabaandthe40nappies Thu 06-Dec-12 08:27:13

OP - I would be furious about the nursery issue. They cannot possibly get away with charging you under those circumstances.

Rooney I was about to come and say what moonstorm said about winter tyres. We have them for my car, and while I agree that it is an upfront cost to put 4 new tyres on the car - once you have bought them then they just get replaced as summer tyres do so they don't go on being more expensive IYSWIM?
We are in the SE and have been stuck at home before now when it has been snowy, and DH unable to get to work. He is freelance now so we can't afford for him to be stranded at home not getting paid!

Selky Thu 06-Dec-12 08:34:29

My nursery decided to close for the day for the Golden Jubiliee and refused to refund us for the day. That was 2 years ago and I'm still furious!

TheDoctrineOfSnatch Thu 06-Dec-12 08:36:39

But breathe, if they have insufficient staff to open fully, then if they weren't able to only take some not all children, they would be closed altogether and would charge anyway. I don't see how I'm worse off in that situation.

ChristmasIsForPlutocrats Thu 06-Dec-12 08:38:48

When DS was at nursery and I was a SAHM, I was bloody grateful if nursery cover fell on snowy days, as it was too flipping cold for DS at home!

babybythesea Thu 06-Dec-12 08:46:00

"What I don't really understand is why schools and nurseries close when it snows, but all the offices, shops, restauants and factories manage to stay open. Everyone else manages to get to work somehow but not teachers or nursery assistants."

If you work in an office and have a difficult journey, it doesn't matter so much if you make it in late. The work will wait. On the other hand, if teachers live a way from school and are late arriving (and certainly at my sister's school only one teacher lives locally to the school), while all the pupils live nearby and get in on time, what are the kids supposed to do? Several hundred pupils sit quietly and wiat under the supervision of one or two adults while the rest of the staff turn up as and when they can? It's not safe or legal! Certainly in other situations I've worked in, if someone can't get there on time, you muddle on until they do show up. It's not always possible to do that in a school. If it's just one teacher, fine. What if it's the bulk of the staff?

My sister, a reception teacher, lives a fair way from her school in a rural area (no gritters, small country roads). When there was bad snow (last year? year before? memory is going!) her village was thick with it - the neighbouring village had farmers on tractors bringing them supplies for three days as the roads were completely impassable. She set off at 6.00am (normally it's a 45 minute journey) and at 8.00 was not yet half way there when she got a phone call saying school was shut - like her, the majority of the teachers were struggling to make it in. There was next to no snow in that town and parents were cross, saying the kids could go in and the staff could turn up when they managed it. Right. So which parents are volunteering to stay and organise the children while teachers like my sister turn up at 10.00/10.30? While my sister's neighbour, who worked in the same town, decided having travelled for a couple of hours she might as well keep going and arrived at work at 11.00 so despite the late start she did a 'day at work'.

In contrast, when I was at primary school, most of my teachers lived in the same town and could walk, just like the pupils, so we very rarely closed.

LaQueen Thu 06-Dec-12 09:44:33

YANBU...it's pathetic, 5 snowflakes fall on the playground and it's 'Whoopee...let's send the kids home' angry

Luckily, our DD's school rarely, if ever, closes, due to snow/ice. And, it's in a small village, quitew remote, at the end of a very long country lane that is notorious for icing up. But the HT is old-school, and doesn't think little things like weather should stop a child getting an education, thank goodness smile

Two years ago, when there'd been quite a bit of snow, a few inches, we were informed by email that morning - that the school would be open as normal, but a couple of teachers couldn't make it in (literally, they lived a long way out in the sticks) so there wouldn't be formal lessons, as such. Children were also asked to bring wellies and wrap up extra warm.

We dropped our DDs off, as normal, and they had a great day, lots of reading/drawing and 2 extended playtimes where the whole school built snowmen smile

However, at the same time...the school in our village was closed for 2 days...despite being in the centre of a large busy, well serviced village which is only 500 yards from an A-road...and despite the vast majority of the teaching staff actually living in the village...or in the nearest martket town which has easy access via the A road (which was gritted and cleared of snow).

LaQueen Thu 06-Dec-12 09:46:26

Oh, and on that day I described above...the teachers at our DD's school just got up extra early to ensure they got to school on time ...because they're quite sensible like that.

ceeveebee Thu 06-Dec-12 09:55:42

I get the ratio issue for nursery but not so much for schools.

Don't schools have contingency plans? Surely there must be at least some staff who can make it in, so on snow days can't the pupils all sit in the assembly hall supervised by those teachers/assistants that can be there, with some kind of activity that could be planned in advance for use on those days, and then formal lessons start late?

5madthings Thu 06-Dec-12 09:56:52

laqueen my boys primary is the same, snow doesnt stop school and they all had a great time building snowmen etc.

Sorry but two onches that has already melted and everything shuts down, it IS CRAP!!!

And the nursery are being massively unreasonable, tbh if they have attitude like that and tried to insist on payment i woulf be looking for an alternative childcare provider. Just because a parent isnt in paid employment doesnt mean they dont have a valid reason for needing childcare, tbh if you are paying you dont need any reason at all!

LaQueen Thu 06-Dec-12 17:26:19

5mad I absolutely adore our HT, she is so incredibly sensible and practical and no nonsense.

She fully understands the chaos/stress it would cause to parents, especially the working ones, if she closed the school. So, she bends over backwards to ensure that it never closes.

If they can only muster a skeleton staff, then the children are supervised in the hall, or get extended break times, building snowmen smile

LaQueen Thu 06-Dec-12 17:29:07

It's the same with DH's staff.

When we've had snow in the past, DH has always managed to make it into the office. Eventhough we live 17 miles away, in a very rural area with few gritters about.

And yet...and yet...several of his staff someohow fail make it into work, despite living within the city limits, only a short walk from the gritted and snow-clear tram/bus routes... hmm

laptopdancer Thu 06-Dec-12 17:35:24

Any tips or driving in the snow/ice in an auto?

Enfyshedd Thu 06-Dec-12 18:35:44

babybythesea - "If you work in an office and have a difficult journey, it doesn't matter so much if you make it in late. The work will wait."

Not necessarily. I work for an investment company and if we don't complete all the deals received that morning by the cut off point (after 7 months of maternity leave, I can't quite remember if it's 11am or 12noon), we're in deep doo-doo. I think it's reportable to the Financial Services Authority (FSA) and counts against our fitness to practise. Also if we don't have enough experienced staff in and we have complaints to deal with that could normally be dealt with by the end of the day after they're received, they would become reportable complaints which are also recorded by the FSA. I remember several years ago when our office had to close for a couple of days when the air conditioning broke down over night in the middle of a very hot summer - all staff with medical conditions that could be aggrivated by the heat were sent home almost as soon as they arrived. I was amongst the last to leave the office at 11.30am because I had to wait for contract files to arrive and mail them out that day - also a time sensitive process. We ended up having to invoke the disaster recovery process so selected members of staff were bussed to another location 60 miles away the next day for the work to be completed while the repair work was done.

Wellthen Thu 06-Dec-12 19:22:09

The amount of snow has nothing to do with anything. If it hasnt been gritted, has rain recently after snowing or there has been an accident it will be terrible.

They will try to stay open at all costs. Something specific will have caused them to close - NOT a whim. It is equally inconvinient for people not getting paid, teachers who will now not be able to fit everything in this week they wanted to etc etc.

jamdonut Thu 06-Dec-12 21:34:30

Most of the TA's usually make it into our school,when it snows, because we are local. Most of the teachers live 10-30 miles away. In my experience, parents don't bother bringing kids to school when there has been significant snowfall,because for a lot of push-chair-ing mums it is just about impossibleto get through the snow.

Its not just the getting to school,though, is it? Its the getting home again. Teachers have families too! We live in an area with no nearby motorways or dual carriageways/ringroads. There is a lot of moorland and wolds surrounding our seaside town. If it is heavy snow, the roads become impassable with drifting snow. Last year some teachers(who car share) set off from school a little early (about 2.45pm),when we had very heavy snow falling. They didn't get home (20 miles away) till getting on for 9pm.

CelineMcBean Thu 06-Dec-12 23:57:23

When I was a child and it snowed teachers would go to the nearest school if they couldn't get to their usual place of work. I can remember my own mother taking a class in my school because she couldn't get out of the valley where we lived and nobody could get in.

We had an air drop if essential supplies to the village from a helicopter shock but the school still opened although some of the class rooms were shut due to heating problems and parents had the option of collecting dc early at lunch time. The canteen became a classroom and we doubled up and split classes found the remaining classrooms and had a great time in the snow. We went to school on sledges! This was in south east, not the wilds of Scotland so snow doesn't fall every year.

These days I doubt LAs would be able to cope with unknown teachers going to unknown schools and we're all a but more wimpy about snow. I had someone who couldn't walk 4 streets to her nearest office to get to work even though other people made it in from much further out and worse conditions. She didn't get paid.

SickOfBeingSoScared Wed 19-Dec-12 12:18:27

As an update, the nursery are still insisting that I am charged for this day and I have paid for it. They are very unhappy that I am questioning it.

Apparently their T&C's (which they did not give me a copy of which DC started, I had to ask for one) state that if the nursery has to CLOSE in an emergency we still have to pay, which is fair enough but the nursery was not CLOSED it was open but only to working parents (and I pay the same as them) and I did actually have 'work' to do. I have no idea of how many staff got in or how many DCs turned up.

They have since stuck a big sign up saying that if there is further adverse weather conditions (which there probably will be) that they will prioritise DCs of working parents again and will still charge - this sign was not up before the day in question.

I am still very angry about this. Fair enough if they want to only admit working parents but in that case do not charge the parents of children you are refusing to admit! AIBU still? and how can I word a letter - brain is fried at the moment!

LadyHarrietdeSpook Wed 19-Dec-12 12:30:56

SickOfBeingSoScared

If you have a DH/DP perhaps HE is a working parent?!

Or is what they're saying is SAHM get stuffed.

I am a working mum and I agree their policy is rubbish. If you're paying the same amount, you get the same treatment. I am assuming that YOU have no flexibility which days you choose. If you do and you could use another day in place of that, then I can see their point. But I very much doubt this is the case.

I would be taking it further.

ChristmasIsForPlutocrats Wed 19-Dec-12 20:46:33

Start talking to other SAH parents.

natation Wed 19-Dec-12 21:10:15

I can't agree more, it's really a poor excuse to close schools in slightly more difficult weather conditions. We're in Belgium, we have as much snow as the north of England get in Winter and it's actually a bit colder here. It would take complete failure of a school's heating system for a local school to close here, it's more than possible for a child to go through all 16 years of school here without their school ever closing due to bad weather. Teachers set off earlier to get to school, classes double up, people with common sense have Winter tyres here, even if they're only needed in reality for a few weeks in the Winter.

In contrast, some of the big international schools in Brussels closed 2 weeks ago for the day, in the end very little snow, it shows the difference is nothing to do with the weather when making the decision to close schools, it's to do with not wanting to take any risks at all.

SickOf, for wording of your complaint, how about:

Dear xx,

Today, despite the nursery being open, I was informed that, due to 'weather conditions' not only would my son not be admitted to his scheduled session, but that the session would be charged for anyway. When I questioned this, I was referred back to the terms and conditions (t&c's) of my contract with [nursery name].

The t&c's state that where [nursery name] closes for reasons beyond its control (which could reasonably be assumed to include adverse weather conditions), payment is expected. This is something I was aware of, and have no problem with adhering to, should such a case arise. There is no reference within the t&c's that allows [nursery name] to charge for non-delivery of service when the nursery is open.

Given the above, I will therefore not be paying for the afternoon session of Wednesday, 19th of December, or for any other sessions where [nursery name] is open, but is refusing to admit my son.

Should you wish to discuss this further, please do so in writing.

Regards,

SickOfBeingSoScared

Needs a bit of editing, but will hopefully help the thought processes along

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