To hate the term Playdate, aghhhhhh

(245 Posts)
pigletmania Wed 09-Jun-10 08:30:39

That's it really, its so American, so aghghhhhh. Why cant it be like it was, going round to play! If I hear of that term again I will spontaniously combust grin.

TakeLovingChances Wed 09-Jun-10 08:34:24

YANBU.

First time I heard it I had no idea what my friend was talking about; I had to ask what it meant confused

I know now what it means, but don't like the phrase. Will continue to say, "meet up together with the kids." Much more sensible sounding!

zephyrcat Wed 09-Jun-10 08:34:36

Thank you...glad someone else feels the same!! grin

belgo Wed 09-Jun-10 08:34:49

Agree!

Also hate hearing the word 'season' instead of 'series' when describing british TV shows. So American!

ifancyashandy Wed 09-Jun-10 08:36:38

I was thinking of starting a thread about this exact same thing!

There is something about it that is soooooo smug and prissy. I detest it.

pigletmania Wed 09-Jun-10 08:37:34

oh and we have a 'Show and Tell' at dds pre school too. Whatever happened to home day or brining your toy day like it used to be called.

pigletmania Wed 09-Jun-10 08:39:46

I know ifancy its oozes smugness i could not have put it in a better way. I was collecting dd from pre school which is attatched to the local primary school, a mum was calling to another mum quite loudly, that she will have to arrange a playdate with her, ahhhhh my poor ears.

pigletmania Wed 09-Jun-10 08:41:35

When I arrange with other mums for our dcs to come round to play not a playdate.

Ladyanonymous Wed 09-Jun-10 08:44:49

Ooohhh me too and my kids have begun saying "I'm done" rather than "I have finished" hmm ARGH!!!!!!!!!!!!!

We are English, not bloody American and if I had wanted you to speak in a twee American accent and use twee American phrases I would've moved to the States before you were born!!!

...and breathe...

pigletmania Wed 09-Jun-10 08:46:20

My dd watches Dora, Bear and playhouse Disney and has adotped Americanisms. When she wants to go to the toilet, she has i have to go to the bathroom hmm, despite my saying its toilet.

It's a horrible word but did we actually have a word for the concept before?

It used to be called 'coming round for tea', or 'going round to play', but there was no noun.

belgo Wed 09-Jun-10 09:09:19

'coming round to play' sufficed when I was a child!

pigletmania Wed 09-Jun-10 09:27:00

Trillian thats the way I always knew it, and thought it still was until reading MN and hearing the mother shouting about a playdate. Sounds so formal and twee, I hate it

ABitBatty Wed 09-Jun-10 09:32:38

I hate it too. However, no-one round here says it that I have heard. I say 'coming round for tea'.

xstitch Wed 09-Jun-10 09:33:46

I hate it too. I don't call them playdates. I especially hate it since my SIL told me that proper mums call them playdates. Made me even more determined not to call it that but I'm stubborn.

pigletmania Wed 09-Jun-10 09:36:06

xstitch hmm regarding your sIL and proper mums whaaaat. So those who do not use the term are not then! What else does she define as being proper mum behaviour I wonder hmm

Bollox Wed 09-Jun-10 09:37:49

I feel the same about Pre-School. what happned to playgroup?

shinyrobot Wed 09-Jun-10 09:43:12

I detest it too, in a quite irrational way really as I can't quite put my finger on why. I have never heard it used in the area we live in however, it is always 'come to play' or 'come round for tea'.

Stupid American phrase....

xstitch Wed 09-Jun-10 09:47:28

pigletmania her ideas change everyday. Basically do the complete opposite to me and you will be fine. She is a bit very nuts

Snobear4000 Wed 09-Jun-10 09:59:22

I don't use the phrase. Not because it's American, I hasten to add (there are many Americans here on MN who might be appalled by the discussion so quickly descending into xenophobia), but because a "date" is something teenagers do as a precursor to having a snog or a fuck. I'm afraid I don't believe 4yo DS is at that stage yet.

"Coming over to our house" is good enough for me. Anyone inviting DS over for a "play date" will be politely refused, as I feel that only freaky alpha-mums use the term and I don't want to be anywhere near them.

I will of course make an exception for my American friends.

Tidey Wed 09-Jun-10 10:04:13

I actually think season makes more sense than series. All of the episodes ever made of a programme make up the series, each season is the smaller blocks of programmes. Would agree with 'playdate' being yuck though.

fragola Wed 09-Jun-10 10:07:14

Hate the phrase, hate it, hate it, hate it, and I will never use it. It should be banned.

Def NBU. My dd has her friends over to play or goes to their house to play, they don't have playdates. She attends an International school where all the children seem to have a mid Atlantic accent hmm despite being, on the whole European. She started to ask for cookies, the bathroom, call me Mom and talk about playdates. All were refused until she reverted to proper english talk.

CrankyTwanky Wed 09-Jun-10 10:13:02

I do hate it, but I think more for slightly racist reasons than anything.blush

It's not a bad word, really. Succinct.

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