to think my child should not be wetting herself in year 1

(109 Posts)
user1480243135 Sun 27-Nov-16 11:06:59

Just putting this in a busier area. My daughter is 5 and in year 1. She wets herself all the time. I'm honestly at a loss, have tried so many different things including the doctor and I'm paranoid what the teachers must think of us. She doesn't seem at all bothered. Has anyone any experience of this?

monkeysox Sun 27-Nov-16 11:11:55

Take her to the docs?

user1480243135 Sun 27-Nov-16 11:12:53

Thank you so much for replying. I've been to the doctor three times, and tests have come back clear.

NickNacks Sun 27-Nov-16 11:14:19

What tests?

chickenowner Sun 27-Nov-16 11:16:46

It happens in year 1, and with older children sometimes. Don't worry about the teacher, we understand that these things happen.

Is there a school nurse that you can talk to? The one at our school has suggestions to help with issues like this.

user1480243135 Sun 27-Nov-16 11:16:49

He's checked she hasn't got cystitis and has checked there's no other urine infection.

myoriginal3 Sun 27-Nov-16 11:17:04

What has doctors suggested? I would recommend being proactive about discussing it with the school.

Msqueen33 Sun 27-Nov-16 11:17:37

Is it at home and school? Does Shen know when she needs to go?

user1480243135 Sun 27-Nov-16 11:17:39

I know chickenowner, I think the occasional accident would be fine but it's near enough every day and it must be such a nuisance for her teacher as well as embarrassing (for me, she doesn't seem bothered.)

chickenowner Sun 27-Nov-16 11:17:54

Is it that she doesn't want to leave the classroom in case she misses something? I have known this happen to children when they're enjoying an activity.

Or is she too nervous to ask to go?

user1480243135 Sun 27-Nov-16 11:18:09

Yes, it's home and school, but school seems to be worse. But she did it as playgroup and nursery as well.

user1480243135 Sun 27-Nov-16 11:19:10

I think she does get involved in things and then decides not to go. I do think part of its laziness but no one else's child seems to do it

chickenowner Sun 27-Nov-16 11:19:11

I agree about talking to the teacher about it, together you may be able to come up with some ideas. An experienced KS1 teacher has probably come across this before.

sofato5miles Sun 27-Nov-16 11:19:14

Take her to a urologist. I know bed wetting can remain a problem till 7/8yrs and one of my friend's DD still has night nappies at 10. It is somethibg to do with the hormone trigger developing later.

DadSpeaking Sun 27-Nov-16 11:19:18

We had this same problem, more at night but often during the day. We tried everything nothing worked. SHe wouldnt even go to the loo at night.

What worked for us was a sticker chart. Everytime she goes to the loo on her own she gets a sticker. At the end of week if she get all boxes she has a treat.

She still has accidents but 100% better. instead of thinking i want a wee who cares. Shes thinks yes i get a treat if i go.

may work for you too

ClopySow Sun 27-Nov-16 11:19:59

My son was like this up until 7. They can have bladder issues that are not related to infections, something to do with the correct signals not getting through to the brain

chickenowner Sun 27-Nov-16 11:20:02

For example, I have taught children who need to be reminded to go to the toilet, drink water, etc, at particular times of the day.

NickNacks Sun 27-Nov-16 11:20:08

There's lots of things that cause children to wet. You should go back to the doc and push for further investigation.

Has she ever been fully dry or is this a new thing?

I don't know why you're worried what sort of people the teacher will think you are- surely your daughter's health is more important. It's an odd comment.

Muddlingthroughtoo Sun 27-Nov-16 11:20:11

Certain foods/drinks cause you to wee more often. Black-currant drinks are one of those.
Does she drink a lot? My daughter used to have accidents because she was too busy playing to go to the toilet, even now at 8 she will hold it until last minute until she's waddling to the toilet like a duck!

user1480243135 Sun 27-Nov-16 11:21:12

I've tried praise and reward, but she doesn't seem remotely bothered, punishments don't have any effect either (I know you shouldn't but there have been times I've just been so frustrated I have shouted at her.) I've spoken to the teacher mostly to apologise and they don't seem to have any ideas, her behaviour isn't great overall to be honest and I do feel I'm being judged.

Iamnotaplastichag Sun 27-Nov-16 11:22:32

Have a look at 'eric' website: www.eric.org.uk "a national charity that supports children with continence problems and campaigns for better childhood continence care" Full of great info

user1480243135 Sun 27-Nov-16 11:23:38

NickNacks, because I'm pretty sure it's not health related. Obviously that was one of the first things I checked. Maybe I am focusing on the wrong thing but it's just so frequent and was in reception as well that k can't help but wonder what is said about her/us behind closed doors.

Anyway she doesn't drink much, she is bright and alert and although she is not 100% at night it's sort of within the realms of normal wetting, so the occasional accident rather than the never ending wetting, she's even wet herself at her friends parties.

chickenowner Sun 27-Nov-16 11:23:58

Ask the teacher to remind her to go at certain times of the day, such as just before play and lunchtimes, just before hometime, etc. This is not an unreasonable request, or at least I don't think so! I've been a KS1 and Early Years teacher for 17 years. smile

user1480243135 Sun 27-Nov-16 11:24:48

yes, I've asked this smile not sure whether the teacher does remind her or if she does go.

ClopySow Sun 27-Nov-16 11:24:56

Don't punish. I know it's really frustrating, but it's not deliberate. I mean who would choose to humiliate themself like that?

I gave my son a really hard time, i massively regret that.

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