Why are fireworks still on sale if they are so dangerous?

(38 Posts)
MyschoolMyrules Sun 06-Nov-16 20:13:23

Every year, thousands of people end up in A&E because of fireworks, smoke inhalation, severe burns, many of the accidents in which children are victims. Yet I think I have read more posts about people complaining about Halloween on Mumsnet than posts about people complaining/stating how dangerous fireworks (during private parties, not large official displays) are. AIBU to think this is just not right? If fireworks are that dangerous surely something should be done about it?

wasonthelist Sun 06-Nov-16 20:16:46

Same reason cars (which kill thousands a year) are for sale rather than forcing everyone to get the bus

latebreakfast Sun 06-Nov-16 20:32:52

Every year, thousands of people end up in A&E because of fireworks

Yes, about 4,000 according to the 2015 figures. This compares to:

- a quarter of a million for road traffic injuries
- 360,000 for sports injuries
- 135,000 due to assault.

If you're seriously concerned about reducing accidents then maybe road safety would be a better area about which to campaign.

ItsJustNotRight Sun 06-Nov-16 20:51:31

Ever been to Spain or Germany? We are amateurs when it comes to fireworks. In 2014 over 21,00O cyclists were injured on the roads in the U.K. Perhaps we should ban bikes as well.

Nataleejah Sun 06-Nov-16 21:28:04

Yabu
Ban everything. Cars, bikes, cutlery also should go

Dahlietta Sun 06-Nov-16 21:28:33

Same reason cars (which kill thousands a year) are for sale rather than forcing everyone to get the bus

But cars do have a practical purpose. Fireworks do not.

Wolfiefan Sun 06-Nov-16 21:31:09

I hate it when (probably drunk) people buy bloody great fireworks and let them off in tiny gardens or in gardens surrounded by trees.
A friend of a friend on FB posted about having three hours of firework noise where they lived. Keeping kids awake and terrifying animals.
I'm happy to go to organised displays but think people should need a licence to buy fireworks. Doubt it will happen as too many people make too much money.

It is daft to compare fireworks to cars - for many people, cars are a necessity, whereas fireworks are never a necessity.

I would happily see firework sales to the general public banned - public displays only. This would dramatically reduce the injuries - and it would mean that many of us didn't have to spend night after night consoling our scared pets. I have to draw the curtains, shut all the doors, and sit with the dogs. One is OK - she wants to be near me but isn't too upset, but our rescue dog shakes like a leaf. She has a tendency to epilepsy and every year I worry that the stress and fear will bring on a fit.

frugalprincess Sun 06-Nov-16 21:41:36

I get where you're coming from OP. If you think about it like this...in the UK fireworks are predominantly used by the public one day a year (I'm not saying always) and there are 4000 accidents as an earlier OP says...so if fireworks were an everyday occurrence there would be 1.46 million accidents a year...that's more than the other things mentioned added together.

goodgodlemon Sun 06-Nov-16 21:57:54

Oh I completely agree myschool - can't understand the logic of selling potentially lethal fireworks to the general public. Why not sell only to registered or community type groups - it would really encourage group events - neighbours getting together/ more charity events etc. Get some proper community bonfires going again too - maybe I miss my childhood village bonfire night too much!!grin

Fanfeck Sun 06-Nov-16 22:07:01

Why are cigarettes legal?

alltouchedout Sun 06-Nov-16 22:10:00

People have the right to take risks.

Hobbes8 Sun 06-Nov-16 22:15:34

My husband used to work in a theatre as a technical manager (sound, lights, special effects - that sort of thing). He had to be trained and registered in order to set off pyrotechnic effects, you know, glitter bombs and smoke bombs - the sort of thing you get in a pan to. Loads and loads of emphasis on safety, actors being a certain distance from the effects, fire training, first aid training, etc. The stuff he was setting off was generally waaaaay less powerful than fireworks that can be sold over the counter. I know he was setting stuff off indoors in crowded space, but it's still crazy that in a relatively risk averse society, you can sell explosives to any idiot.

TreehouseTales Sun 06-Nov-16 22:16:45

Illegal in Australia. I wish it was here too!

NetballHoop Sun 06-Nov-16 22:23:09

I do wonder if polititians wouldn't have banned them long ago if the 5th of November didn't celebrate parliament's win over Guy Fawkes.

wasonthelist Sun 06-Nov-16 22:28:32

I hate all this "ban it" mentality - generally because of

a) The actions of an irresponsible minority
b) The banners' right to complain trumps anyone else right to a bit of fun

Once everything either fun or risky is banned, it will be a sad world.

wasonthelist Sun 06-Nov-16 22:30:11

Doubt it will happen as too many people make too much money.

Or maybe a very large number of us have a bit of fun enjoying our small number of weedy fireworks responsibly. That's certainly the case where I am very fortunate) to live.

Itisnoteasybeingdifferent Sun 06-Nov-16 22:32:43

I was walking through London Fields a couple of years back near Guy Fawkes..

A bunch of children had some fireworks and were shooting them at each other like Star Wars..... Fortunately they didn't seem to be very good at aiming...

When I see stupidity like that, I do wonder about banning them. But then again, if the world was entirely safe, there would be no Darwin Awards.

Davros Sun 06-Nov-16 22:33:09

We love our fireworks in the garden every year on 5th November. DH and I have both done bonfire night every year of our lives and would like to continue. Organised displays are impossible, far too crowded, ticketed, no parking etc. We invite our neighbours round and have dog rolls and potato salad and good fun is had by all. The cat and the hamster are kept indoors for the night

Smartleatherbag Sun 06-Nov-16 22:36:05

It is absolutely ridiculous that anyone can buy explosives from the supermarket or local shop. Absolutely nuts. I'd be happy to never see another one again, outwith organised displays.

wasonthelist Sun 06-Nov-16 22:36:36

. DH and I have both done bonfire night every year of our lives and would like to continue.

Me too - and the added bonus here is I have no pets, nor does next door either side or the two houses across the road. No-one lets of anything silly or too late - why would you ban us - it would be excessive.

I have said before, I'd be fine with legislation to make fireworks less powerful - it's about the fun, tradition and spectacle for me, not out and out loudness.

wasonthelist Sun 06-Nov-16 22:38:06

But cars do have a practical purpose. Fireworks do not.

Yes they do - fun!

ChardonnayKnickertonSmythe Sun 06-Nov-16 22:39:02

Oh sure, right of fun is always more important than safety.

And here I was worrying about pets, wildlife, farm animals and vulnerable people.
Silly me.

wasonthelist Sun 06-Nov-16 22:39:42

It is absolutely ridiculous that anyone can buy explosives from the supermarket or local shop

No it isn't - you can buy knives and deadly poisons from there all year round, and all the chemicals to make a massive bomb with minimal research.

Sparlklesilverglitter Sun 06-Nov-16 22:42:52

Shall we ban bikes, cars, knives as well.
I cant stand the we must "ban" it mentality

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