Moving house - rehoming cats

(47 Posts)
viviennewestood Tue 12-Jul-16 05:19:47

I'm currently in rented property and have 2 cats - landlord had no issue with this. For various reasons I'm having to move to a completely different city and have yet to see a place to rent that allows pets. I didn't foresee that I would have to move a couple of months ago when I adopted them so this is all unexpected.

I'm thinking that I'll have to rehome them sad what other option do I have?

Magstermay Tue 12-Jul-16 06:01:17

Keep looking for now, have you told the agents you have cats? Sometimes they will say no pets but then be flexible in individual circumstances and just ask for a higher deposit.
If you can't find anything would the rescue you got them from have them back?

viviennewestood Tue 12-Jul-16 06:05:10

The rescue said that they would take them back if for whatever reason it didn't work out. I've told 3 agents so far and they said it's unlikely that a landlord would allow.

I feel awful at even the thought of returning them.

WhyCantIuseTheNameIWant Tue 12-Jul-16 06:20:16

If you are renting unfurnished and promise to deep clean carpets when you leave, many places will allow cats.

KittyLaRoux Tue 12-Jul-16 06:25:05

A roof over your head comes before the cats. It is a shame but maybe you shouldnt take on a pet again unless you can give it a home for life.

PageStillNotFound404 Tue 12-Jul-16 06:26:48

Keep looking. It does narrow your options but you will find somewhere. And YY to asking the agents each time rather than taking the "no pets" on t'internet at face value. Stress each time that they don't scratch and are fully house trained (assuming they are). Offer to pay a bit more in the bond and volunteer a clause in the contract that you'll get the place professionally cleaned when you move out.

We've moved into rental twice in six years, both times with two cats (and most recently a dog!). We start off with a longlist from Rightmove that immediately gets halved at least by the "no pets" rule, but there are some pet-friendly landlords out there.

ForalltheSaints Tue 12-Jul-16 07:00:24

How awful. Keep looking

Are you on the list for social housing?

MargaretCavendish Tue 12-Jul-16 07:48:19

It is a shame but maybe you shouldnt take on a pet again unless you can give it a home for life.

What a horrible, sanctimonious comment. I also struggle to see how you would implement it. Presumably only home owners could have a cat - but even then life happens, circumstances change, etc. We actually got our cat from a woman who had to move after a relationship breakdown - she thought he would have a 'home for life' with her.

OP - I'd agree with other people that you should keep looking. It will massively narrow your options, but there are landlords out there who accept pets.

I also think you might want to start enquiring among friends if you decide you do have to rehome. Obviously it's better they go to a shelter than unsuitable people, but if you can find someone who will love and care for them it's better for them to go straight there than to have an intermediate period in the shelter; it's also nicer for you if you know exactly where they'll be and can picture them with their new owners.

scaryteacher Tue 12-Jul-16 07:53:14

I rent with cats and I allow cats in my house in the UK that I let out. I don' t ask for a bigger deposit either. There are l/ls out there who allow cats.

sooperdooper Tue 12-Jul-16 07:54:59

I agree keep looking and ask - you might have to pay a higher deposit but somewhere will come up

Cantusethatname Tue 12-Jul-16 07:59:00

I got my cat from the Cats Protection. They rehome cats in circumstances like yours (which happens a lot and isn't your fault). They foster them with foster carers and then match them up with new people. They check out the new people to make sure they can care for the cat properly.
It worked really well for us and the cat - we get on very well. You could try them.

HarlettOScara Tue 12-Jul-16 08:02:31

Have you tried finding somewhere that is let by the landlord directly and not through an agent? LLs might well be amenable to the idea if you can speak directly. Try Gumtree ads for places to rent.

Booboostwo Tue 12-Jul-16 08:39:38

Can you afford to offer a double deposit? I 'vemanaged to a couple of times with two dogs, cat and two rabbits by offering a double deposit. I got the carpets and sofa professionally cleaned when leaving and got my deposit back both times.

KittyLaRoux Tue 12-Jul-16 08:49:52

What a horrible, sanctimonious comment. I also struggle to see how you would implement it. Presumably only home owners could have a cat - but even then life happens, circumstances change, etc.

No it isnt and no not only home owners as social housing is longterm tennacy but if you rent privately you run the risk of having to rehome the pets you took on because you dont have a home for life.

rainyday79 Tue 12-Jul-16 08:53:24

You need to make sure the letting agents contact the landlords and actually ask them, making sure that they give all the info i.e which rooms cats will be allowed in, if they're house trained, if you're happy to pay extra deposit etc...I have dealt with a lot of letting agents and am a landlord myself. In my experience letting agents can be very difficult and will do what's best/easiest/most profitable for them and often the landlords will be lenient.

PageStillNotFound404 Tue 12-Jul-16 08:59:34

Kitty I will bet you good money that there are far, far more animals in rescue at this moment because of homeowners' "new baby" than because of "in private rental, couldn't find a landlord who'd take pets".

KittyLaRoux Tue 12-Jul-16 09:02:16

And your point is what?

Aprilrosesews Tue 12-Jul-16 09:02:57

Have you tried finding somewhere that is let by the landlord directly and not through an agent?

We found when looked for our last house that all houses through agents had the same blanket no pets no children etc. We went through an agent but then when we moved in and spoke to our landlord directly as we have a GPiL that visits regularly with a dog to see if would she be ok with it if he came in the house, even offered to just keep him in the kitchen so not on carpet, and she said he was fine anywhere in the house. The reason she'd taken the policy was that the last tenants had pets and had not asked, they also got a dog while both working FT which was something the landlady personally disagreed and they ended up not managing and giving the dog up. They might be a reason behind them saying that which could change with a conversation and a bit of reassuring.

Is yours unfurnished or furnished? This made a difference for us as well. We'd asked as we looking at getting a cat and she said she'd be fine as they aren't as bad as dogs for peeing on things and unfurnished so no damage to her belonging only ours. Some landlord may be wary of the cat stratches on chair etc.

Aprilrosesews Tue 12-Jul-16 09:12:29

page I totally agree no one can anticipate their personal circumstances for the next 10+ years. My OH asked what would happen when we have children if they don't get on with the cats or are allergic or any number of possible problems. My simple response: the cats were here first. The children can lump it for the next 10 years.

Remembermyname Tue 12-Jul-16 09:16:14

We have 2 cats and just rented 2 houses. Both times we got written into the contract we would have the carpets 'pet cleaned' (higher temp than normal) and the curtains dry cleaned. Some money is also being held for 3 months in case of flea infestation. The costliest bit was dry cleaning the curtains

MargaretCavendish Tue 12-Jul-16 09:24:20

No it isnt and no not only home owners as social housing is longterm tennacy but if you rent privately you run the risk of having to rehome the pets you took on because you dont have a home for life.

Right, and my point is that nearly everyone runs this risk to some extent. Unless you outright own your own home and know that you will absolutely always have the ability to fund its maintenance regardless of your employment status, marital status, etc. then your circumstances could change, too.

KittyLaRoux Tue 12-Jul-16 10:11:34

Of course situations change but if you are private renting that greatly increases the probability of you having to leave the property and find another private let which can prove difficult when pets are involved.

viviennewestood Tue 12-Jul-16 10:33:20

When I adopted them of course I thought I would be able to give them a home forever. But life doesn't work that way and now I've found myself in an awful predicament and as a single mum to 2 year old dd I need to put our needs first.

The cats are 10 month old and do unfortunately scratch furniture etc. and one of them has issues with the litter tray still despite all my best efforts to train them. The shelter I got them from are absolutely lovely and I know they'd be well taken care of if they went back there.

I wouldn't be able to afford a double deposit because this move is completely out of the blue and administration fees and bonds etc are so expensive anyway as you all know.

AlMinzerAndHisPyramidOfDogs Tue 12-Jul-16 10:36:49

i would rehome them.

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