to ask how to handle this?

(37 Posts)
Newjobwoes Sun 17-Apr-16 07:35:07

So, I've just changed job, been in new job for 7 days. I was at my old job for five years, it is a senior and qualified position. I love the new job in terms of type of work, I feel that I can move to the next level of qualification in this new position which would achieve my ambition. I'm an older woman, done all this quite late on in life but loving it. It's meant that our family life has improved in terms of finance and we can do lovely things like holiday abroad etc.

In short I'm enjoying the new challenge and more technical work.

Now here is the problem....it's a small office, I've only been there seven days but I've been informed that the two ladies working alongside me, who do not hold any industry qualifications are on dreadful money, been informed by one of them exactly their salary, that I've negotiated more annual leave than they get (how was I to know that?) that they've asked for more leave and not got it. It is mainly coming from one of the ladies, I asked how she knew my salary etc, she said well I'm not supposed to know, so clearly she has gone looking. I'm not happy at all, firstly my contract should be kept in a place that is locked? Secondly, she clearly feels aggrieved at my salary and terms of contract.

It's so massively unprofessional, I'm not sure how to deal with it? I was shocked on Friday when this all came out. But do I raise my concerns on Monday? If I do it will presumably get her into serious trouble?

My predecessor lasted just six weeks, she informed me that they (the two ladies) were told that the extreme negativity by them contributed to the short stay.

They are both massively negative about the company and do nothing but run it down. I am upbeat and this is a great opportunity for me.

I did say they couldn't achieve a significant pay rise without the required exams, but she said I don't want to take them. My attitude is well that's your choice! I get up at 5am to study when I'm sitting exams, I put a lot of effort into it. The exams are expensive and the company pay for them, so I need to put the effort in.

So how do I deal with the massive negativity and unprofessionalism?

Do I just say....look I've left a good job to come here, you are clearly very unhappy in your role but please let me make my own assumptions about the company? Do I do anything about the fact they have read my contract?

curren Sun 17-Apr-16 07:49:34

I would put a formal complaint in. I wouldn't confront her.

I don't think (but not 100%) that your contract has to be under lock and key. She may have reason to have access to certain things, but has abused that by looking at your contract.

Sounds like it doesn't matter where they put them. Even in a locked cupboard she sounds like the type to steal the key anyway. Employers have to be able to trust their employees to a certain degree.

In my last job I had access to sensitive documents and could have probably found everyone else's contracts. I have no right or reason to look at those, so didn't.

What she has done is disgusting. The management need to be aware she can't be trusted.

Do you have an HR dept? Normal they would have the contract. Has she been in there when she shouldn't have been?

Newjobwoes Sun 17-Apr-16 07:55:44

Curren you have hit the nail on the head! Yes maybe she does need to access other documents but she admitted she wasn't supposed to look at my contract. There is no HR, it's a very small company. It'll make things very difficult as I work in the same office as her.

Im not sure why she thinks that my contract and terms should mirror hers, my position is totally different to hers.

Newjobwoes Sun 17-Apr-16 07:56:47

Curren you have hit the nail on the head! Yes maybe she does need to access other documents but she admitted she wasn't supposed to look at my contract. There is no HR, it's a very small company. It'll make things very difficult as I work in the same office as her.

Im not sure why she thinks that my contract and terms should mirror hers, my position is totally different to hers.

Newjobwoes Sun 17-Apr-16 07:57:30

Sorry for the double post.

tippytap Sun 17-Apr-16 08:02:09

Bearing in mind the fact that your predecessor lasted six weeks and directly referred to your two colleagues as part of the reason for leaving, is it possible that she/they are also trying to drive you out as she/.they feel that they should have your job?

cosmicglittergirl Sun 17-Apr-16 08:03:23

I would also make a complaint. Who on earth does she think she is confronting you? Having said that, I'd be wary of how in such a small company the two women can get away with that level of negativity.

Newjobwoes Sun 17-Apr-16 08:07:09

Honestly comparing our jobs is likely comparing a spanner with an apple. It's taken me years to get where I am today. I also am a different person I want to continue learning and gaining qualifications, she doesn't, which is fine but she cannot expect to get the same or even close salary.

Newjobwoes Sun 17-Apr-16 08:08:47

There is no negativity when the "bosses" are about but the second they leave it's a tirade of moaning.

Should I say when they start this, "please don't, it's putting me off this job" and I really want this to work out for me.

curren Sun 17-Apr-16 08:10:48

She is making things very difficult for anybody who works there.

There is only one way to deal with people like her. And that's to stand up to them.

If it's a small company it's entirely possible they store the contracts appropriately. But she knows where that is and has looked at them. She knows she shouldn't have. Bets are that she is doing a lot of other things she shouldn't be doing either.

If you contract was left on a shelf. She still shouldn't have looked at it.

I own my own company. Contracts are in a filling cabinet. I don't particularly hide the fact that they are in there. Although I don't go out of my way to say they either. That doesn't excuse anyone opening it and looking at someone else contract.

Where else could I put them? With a lock that has a retina scan? There is only so much you can do.

Your choices are stay until it gets to much, leave now or put a complaint in. A serious one.

SfaOkaySuperFurryAnimals Sun 17-Apr-16 08:11:49

Personally, I would blow the whole thing up, I had this, sometimes entitled divas just need to come across someone with more strength them, its not pleasant to work in but she is trying to push you so push back. Set your stall, I had a period of discomfort but now said person has left our work place is loads happier. Kill her with cheer and smiles, but definitely place a formal complaint. Good luck...

curren Sun 17-Apr-16 08:12:12

It won't make it awkward.

It's gross misconduct. She should be sacked for it. She won't be there

Bringiton2016 Sun 17-Apr-16 08:12:16

This happened to me back in the day. I went straight to management and the two women were called into a meeting. They never brought it up or gave me any trouble again. You have negotiated your own contract it's nothing to do with them or theirs.

As for getting them in trouble; you owe them nothing. You don't even know them. Hopefully management can help them on their way if they're so unhappy. Good luck.

carabos Sun 17-Apr-16 08:28:35

It's bullying. I had the same when I took a senior role in a small company. The accounts lady told anyone who cared to listen how much I was being paid, and several people commented on it to me, quite rudely. I was astonished and confused, they thought it was normal hmm.

Newjobwoes Sun 17-Apr-16 08:42:15

I think I'm going to have to fight fire with fire, luckily I'm not a shy retiring person and I do know my job.

She's also made a couple of sarky comments relating to my knowledge. One was regarding a type of trust that this company uses a different name for.

Me:- "Boss" what's a XYZ, is it the same as a YZX?

Boss:- yeah it is, it's just our specific name but it does the same thing.

Her:- oh smarty pants you

Now I should've said something regarding that, like "do you have an issue with my know,edge"

But I didn't first week and all that so I just said nothing.

cosmicglittergirl Sun 17-Apr-16 08:56:22

Take her down! She's being very unprofessional.

HeddaGarbled Sun 17-Apr-16 08:57:50

I would like to suggest a different way of handling this which is to watch and wait.

You have only been there a week. It is too soon to start making official complaints and accusing your new colleagues of things.

Being in a senior role at work means you take responsibility for senior level work but you also take responsibility for handling all sorts of different colleagues and clients with their varied personalities and working styles. You have unfortunately been landed with a couple of difficult ones but this doesn't mean you can't handle them.

I would go with friendly but professional. So maintain a friendly demeanour, do a bit of social chat but extract yourself from any conversations which become overly negative. It's like training a toddler, react positively to good behaviour and ignore bad behaviour.

However, at the same time, I would be keeping a note of any incidents that you feel have crossed the line between irritating or negative behaviour and those which could be construed as bullying or against company regulations (such as actively finding out about your pay and conditions). Then if in a couple of months time, you feel that you do need to make an official complaint, you will have a good bank of evidence on which to base it.

Newjobwoes Sun 17-Apr-16 09:06:08

Hedda, that's probably a very good idea!!

Gide Sun 17-Apr-16 09:15:03

Zero tolerance, pick up on any comments made and remind them of your qualifications. I would perhaps approach the bosses and enquire about the possibility of a different work space for them or you so you're not in each others' hair all day long.

Whilst I wouldn't immediately whinge about them, I would not hesitate if this crap continues. Chin up, you sound like a lovely positive person, don't let the bastards get you down. Smile sweetly at every comment and remind them that they could always go and find a better paid job if they put in the work and arse themselves to get the qualifications.

I would be a cheeky mare and mention to the bosses that you're surprised that insertnamewhingycow knows your salary and is this usual practice?

AyeAmarok Sun 17-Apr-16 09:18:00

I would go with friendly but professional. So maintain a friendly demeanour, do a bit of social chat but extract yourself from any conversations which become overly negative. It's like training a toddler, react positively to good behaviour and ignore bad behaviour.

This is good advice I think.

Poor you, OP. Don't let it spoil your great job and you're right that you deserve what you get and her attitude sounds like it's no surprise she is where she is.

Grilledaubergines Sun 17-Apr-16 09:18:13

When they raise their 'issues', just reply 'you'll need to take that up with management' and then disengage. Every single time. EventuAlly they'll get the message that you have no interest In Their little antics.

hejsvejs Sun 17-Apr-16 09:25:53

I had this in my previous role. The office manager, who did pa and admin things and held no qualifications what so ever, regularly had a moan about how she earns less than me even though she had a manager title but I didn't.

The thing was, what I was doing was much more complicated and required a high and specific skill set and relevant qualifications. If they didn't offer me enough money I could easily go elsewhere.

I never said anything about it though but left eventually partly due to her moaning about things like this.

I partly didn't say anything because I knew she kept bringing this up with her boss who would regularly explain to her why the wages were different.

AnUtterIdiot Sun 17-Apr-16 11:00:23

You have only been there a week. It is too soon to start making official complaints and accusing your new colleagues of things.

This a million times. Be polite and friendly. Do not be surprised that they know your salary etc - in a small business people do know these things, they just get out. If they start making noises about why you're earning more than them, don't get into a tussle about your qualifications, just tell them that it's nothing to do with you and to make a case to their manager if they think they deserve a pay rise.

If they make catty comments when you know things they don't, just ignore it. Seriously. Answers like "do you have an issue with my knowledge" are just descending to their level. Take the moral high ground and laugh quietly as they show their true colours.

How about "Before i started studying I explored different options and could go through them with you, if you're contemplating adding professional qualifications to your experience? Your current position and benefits, you'll need to discuss with your line manager though." Head tilt, smile.

springydaffs Sun 17-Apr-16 12:39:14

Negotiate your own office? A broom cupboard would be better than every day with Hubble and Bubble.

Agree with biding your time and collecting evidence

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