Advice / advise

(57 Posts)
lilyb84 Tue 23-Feb-16 00:26:41

You give advice (noun). Or you advise (verb). Has anyone else noticed the latter being used to mean the former ALL THE BLOODY TIME?!

AIBU to think this is going the way of apostrophes being used in plurals and everyone's favourite 'could of' and entering written language as acceptable usage?

It shouldn't bother me but it does perhaps because I'm 5 hours into a newborn cluster feed and just want to sleep dammit. Oh god, am I becoming the grammar police?!

SuburbanRhonda Tue 23-Feb-16 00:28:12

In the US it's the other way round. Maybe that's part of the problem?

SuburbanRhonda Tue 23-Feb-16 00:28:46

Or is that practice and practise?

Maryz Tue 23-Feb-16 00:29:46

You are being rediculous, I could care less about grammer rule's and I'm weary of all the complaint's grin

You should of posted this in Pendant's Corner note the deliberate misplacing of the apostrophe in Pendants'

lilyb84 Tue 23-Feb-16 00:32:10

Oops, I hadn't considered it being different elsewhere... <hangs head in judgemental shame if that is the case>

Although I was under the impression that practice is a noun and practise a verb as per the advice / advise example?

<scratches head>

lilyb84 Tue 23-Feb-16 00:33:15

It says a lot about my current mental state that I've joined the ranks of complainants maryz blush

ilovesooty Tue 23-Feb-16 00:35:44

Licence / license is the same.

Maryz Tue 23-Feb-16 00:44:49

I don't think advice/advise are used differently in the US though US novelists seem to be wrong a lot - same goes for licence/license, but practice is used for both noun and verb in the US (where obviously they are wrong again). It should be "He practised the practice of law" but US English apparently allows "He practiced the practice of law" shock

steff13 Tue 23-Feb-16 01:21:26

I'm in the US. I advise someone when I give them advice.

steff13 Tue 23-Feb-16 01:23:15

Why would you ever say someone practiced the practice of law? Surely you'd just say he practiced law.

Junosmum Tue 23-Feb-16 02:43:53

Drives me potty too OP. YANBU.

acasualobserver Tue 23-Feb-16 07:25:09

I would also like people to learn the difference between discreet and discrete.

SquirmOfEels Tue 23-Feb-16 07:26:57

The one I can never remember is stationary/stationery

acasualobserver Tue 23-Feb-16 07:28:53

Stationery has an 'e' in for envelopes.

BikeRunSki Tue 23-Feb-16 07:29:18

Stationary = still.
The train is stationary in the station.

lilyb84 Tue 23-Feb-16 07:29:36

I would also like people to learn the difference between discreet and discrete.

Yes!

Drinksforeveryone Tue 23-Feb-16 07:29:47

Squirm

Stationery has the e. E foe Envelope.

FuckyNell Tue 23-Feb-16 07:32:13

Discreet/discrete is my favourite. Even my dd grammar school insist on 'discrete' makeup

Maryz Tue 23-Feb-16 07:32:19

The e in stationery is an e for envelope, Squirm. The a in stationary is an a for acceleration - that's how I was taught.

It's just a way of remembering, steff - but I think it should actually be she practised, to remember that the s is in the verb.

I had a teacher when I was about 8 or 9 who had little tricks for remembering loads of spellings, and most of her tips have stayed with me for over 30 years.

SquirmOfEels Tue 23-Feb-16 07:32:28

Thanks!

I really will work on committing the 'e for envelopes' to memory. I've heard it before, and managed to remember there was a mnemonic on the a/e but simply could not remember what it was.

Maryz Tue 23-Feb-16 07:33:36

Sorry - the acceleration bit is that a car is stationary if it isn't accelerating so has an a in it.

Some of the tips in my head don't actually make much sense, but I can get the spellings right, so who cares grin

WingMirrorSpider Tue 23-Feb-16 07:37:50

I remember stationery because it's like grocery, habadashery, hosiery etc. Stuff for sale in a shop.

But the e for envelope one is easier so I'll use that one from now on.

Katenka Tue 23-Feb-16 07:40:34

God these threads are so shitty.

I have dyslexia. I use what ever predictive text comes up with as a suggestion.

YouTheCat Tue 23-Feb-16 07:40:47

I had an argument over 'practice' and 'practise' last year... with a year 5 teacher.

Mouseinahole Tue 23-Feb-16 07:46:37

'Pendants' Maryz?
Are they to couch in place of pearls?

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now