To be disappointed and feel we've missed the boat on a great opportunity?

(94 Posts)
Gymbuddy Sun 20-Jul-14 17:28:47

My 4 year old son was selected to do a trial for his gymnastics club squad today. He did the trial along with a load of other children but unfortunately he didn't make it sad

His coach said he is not flexible enough. I'm not disappointed in my son at all, just really disappointed that the chance to be on the squad is gone. Probably forever.

Does anyone know about the gymnastics world? Is that it now? Is he only good enough for 'fun' classes or will there be other chances?

WIBU to not go back and just find him another sport to do or should we stick at it?

He enjoys it.

HotDogJumpingFrogAlburquerque Sun 20-Jul-14 17:33:08

Not his last chance at all. Former gymnast here and from what I remember, national squad selection was at about 8-9ish.

4 is WAY too young to write him off!

Although there's nothing wrong with doing sport for fun only.

Stick at it.

It's fun, stop worrying about 'opportunities' and let him enjoy himself.

He's 4.

adsy Sun 20-Jul-14 17:33:43

You know what, by the age of 4 I think he's more than old enough to be written off for that particular sport.
Tell him he's not up to scratch so you have to find him another sport to try,.
Certainly don't let him carry on going just cos he enjoys it.
ffs.

iwantavuvezela Sun 20-Jul-14 17:35:21

He is 4! Can he not re try in 6 months time. I am no expert but he is a growing changing boy, so how gymanstics would he be expected to do? I would be pleased if my child had the talent to be asked to try out, however why would you just give up? Does he enjoy it? Does he have to do something at a high level to stay in it. Can he not just continue with classes?

HotDogJumpingFrogAlburquerque Sun 20-Jul-14 17:36:16

I had only just started gymnastics at 4 in fact, don't think I was selected for anything until about 7ish.

I went on to be amazing grin and modest too.

corlan Sun 20-Jul-14 17:38:15

adsy's right I'm afraid. It's time to face the truth and find another activity where he can excel.

Anyway, giving up gym will leave him more time to study for his 11+.

Gymbuddy Sun 20-Jul-14 17:40:01

The only reason I was thinking of trying him at a different sport was because his coach mentioned hus flexibility.

Don't gymnasts have to be flexible? In which case he may struggle.

I'm not very knowledgeable about gymnastics so I really am ignorant to all of this blush

Pobblewhohasnotoes Sun 20-Jul-14 17:40:34

So you think he should quit because he didn't get in and shouldn't just do it because he enjoys it? Seriously?

He's 4. Let him get on with it if he likes it. If he tries again and gets in great, if not who cares? It's not a reason to quit, or is it only worth doing a sport if you can be in a club?

I did gymnastics at school, we did all all badges and competitions.

Gymbuddy Sun 20-Jul-14 17:41:42

hotdog what were you selected for at 7?

I'm not saying I wanted him to be an Olympic Gymnast (although I would love him to be grin ) but I want him to do a sport which he enjoys and us focused on doing well.

Pobblewhohasnotoes Sun 20-Jul-14 17:43:28

But he does enjoy it! So let him carry on with it!

He's 4, he's got years yet, I didn't start gym until I was about 7.

Gymbuddy Sun 20-Jul-14 17:44:36

Oh dear this isn't going to go well.... confused

Maybe I haven't put myself across pproperly. I'm disappointed he didn't get in to the club BUT that's not the issue.

The issue is he is not flexible enough ..
Which is the whole point of gymnastics.

There's not much point if he has the grace of an elephant surely? grin

HotDogJumpingFrogAlburquerque Sun 20-Jul-14 17:45:47

Women need to be flexible, men don't to the same extent- it's more about strength for them (but male gymnasts are certainly more flexible than the average male)

Selected at 7 for regional team. Then 9 for British development squad.

ElephantsNeverForgive Sun 20-Jul-14 17:46:13

Flexibility comes with work. DD2 started gymnastics too late to be squad (think 9 not 4) having done a bit of ballet.

At 13, she really enjoys gym and trampolining and is pretty good, but she has practiced bends and stretches, splits and handstands for hours and tried to wear out the trampoline.

The only way your DS will get better is by doing stuff and enjoying it.

ImperialBlether Sun 20-Jul-14 17:46:18

There is a hell of a lot of work involved in being an Olympic gymnast! Life as you know it now will disappear. Training will be every day, for several hours before and after school. Yes, it's amazing if someone has that talent, commitment and drive, but many lives are wrecked by their parents having the dream.

mumofthemonsters808 Sun 20-Jul-14 17:46:37

Just let him enjoy the sport, if he was selected the odds are that he would have got fed up of it, possibly by the age of 6. Once you are selected for any squad, training can become very disciplined and the fun element goes out the window, so in my eyes he needs to be older to handle this. Another bonus is that you have avoided many hours of attending tournaments, that may not necessarily be local. There will be lots of opportunities to come his way, so I'd try not to be too disappointed.

Andrewofgg Sun 20-Jul-14 17:47:12

Not flexible enough for this squad compared with other children does not mean not flexible enough to enjoy gymnastics and get something out of it.

dawndonnaagain Sun 20-Jul-14 17:48:16

Even if he has the grace of an elephant, let him do it if he loves it.
I was crap at ballet. I had a number of operations on my feet, I was dyspraxic and I was never going to be a member of Sadlers Wells. My gran took me every week, one because it gave me a break from my mother and two because I loved it. Stop trying to force success on a four year old and let the poor little mite have some fun, there doesn't always have to be a 'result' other than fun.

Let him carry on and let him make the decision as to when he's had enough.

Bogeyface Sun 20-Jul-14 17:48:43

Should all the Sunday Leaguers quit footie because they will never play professionally? No, because they do it for fun.

The whole point of sport is that it is enjoyable. A lucky few become truly outstanding but most dont and do it for the sheer love of it.

I have to say that you reaction to this "If I cant be the best then I am not doing it" will not teach him anything good.

pudcat Sun 20-Jul-14 17:49:03

If he enjoys it does it matter if he is not too flexible? He is only 4. Let him have fun.

Chippednailvarnish Sun 20-Jul-14 17:49:04

He's 4, you know 4 years as in 48 months old.

Nothing has gone forever at this age.

Rockdoctor Sun 20-Jul-14 17:51:56

4! Our gymnastics coach (local relaxed club), doesn't let them even start until 4 (and started school), and then it's just for fun and games.

uggmum Sun 20-Jul-14 17:52:00

Could you look at other forms of gymnastics. I certainly would not right him off at 4.

My ds started baga classes at 4, at six he transferred over to a club and started Tumbling.

He is now 11 and is British Champion for his level and age. He trains 4 times a week for 14 hours in total and he loves it.

For tumbling you don't have to be as flexible and there are plenty of Tumbling clubs all over the country.

uggmum Sun 20-Jul-14 17:52:40

*write

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