To of changed my babys nappy on the train

(154 Posts)
wouldntofgussed Sat 15-Mar-14 16:10:50

Was only ten minutes into an hour and a half journey when my little one needed changing no toilets on the train either. I took her up to the end of the carriage where I change her nappy a lady on the train told me I was disgusting

IamaBreastfeedingTramp Sun 16-Mar-14 19:34:40

I would have nodded vigorously and agreed with her

"yes it's disgusting isn't it, imagine having to sit in it for an hour!"

wtf is wrong with people??? babies poo, shit stinks (probably less as you changed the nappy rather than left it), life goes on...

As for the idea that you should've left the train...!! Really?! On what planet?

bellasuewow Sun 16-Mar-14 18:48:45

Coffee babies cry and poo and wee and puke so do animals and people when they are ill we all live in the real world deal with it

wouldntofgussed Sun 16-Mar-14 18:42:22

The connecting bit between the carriages is tiny and the floor moves so not really a good place to change a baby. Also the seats in both carriages face towards the middle the full train would have all had a good view.
I went as far to the back of the train as I could changing her on a changing mat on the floor(I wouldn't have changed her on the seat or table or even right in front of another passenger) the nappy was wrapped and taken of at the next stop and I opened two windows before sitting back down.

I live to see a row on a bus or a train TheBody. I could feel a box was ticked. But everyone has been nice. confused

HelloBoys Sun 16-Mar-14 15:59:33

Oh out of interest trains I've travelled on recently (first great western etc) most seemed to be big toilets, even southern when you get them can be larger. I'd assume they had pull down baby mats but not sure.

Surely larger toilets with baby change should be industry standard if not because they also look big enough for a wheelchair (that's another topic!).

TheBody Sun 16-Mar-14 15:39:26

wish mumsnetters would realise that correcting posters grammar makes them look such mega twats.

I wish people would be rude like this to me. I have changed my kids millions of times over years and breast fed everywhere but no bugger has ever once commented.

not bloody fair when you really could do with a good old row. grin

spikeymikie Sun 16-Mar-14 15:32:22

Those of us with disabled older children have to change them on toilet floors all the time. Since this option was not available to the OP what she did was reasonable.

HelloBoys Sun 16-Mar-14 15:04:05

I'm childless and agree with what you did OP!

However I'd also have asked (guard was on train) if there was anywhere (eg staff toilet) on train that I could've changed baby in. Most sane train staff would help you.

I think it's disgusting there are not toilets or baby change facilities (put in toilets if no room for separate) on most trains.

And finally for everyone who whinges re toilets not being nice to change babies well not nice for travellers either in toilets but you deal with it.

ShredMeJillianIWantToBeNatalie Sun 16-Mar-14 14:56:21

If they have, I haven't seen it Walton

Waltonswatcher1 Sun 16-Mar-14 14:37:55

No one can defend changing a baby on a dining table surely ? That would be utterly disgusting .
The op didn't mention tables or have I missed something ?
Learn how to change on your laps for gods sake ! It is an easy thing to master and means you can perch anywhere and do a bum discreetly . Problem solved .

Chunderella Sun 16-Mar-14 14:01:34

It does take all sorts indeed OhMerGerd. In your case, if your DC have never had sore bottoms due to waiting to be changed you've either never been in a situation where no changing facilities would be available for some time, or they have arses of teflon. That might perhaps explain why you're taking a position so far removed from both the majority and from reasonableness.

OhMerGerd Sun 16-Mar-14 12:49:42

I have had a couple of babies myself so I do know how they work smile ... that's is why I find the dogmatic insistence that OP is not unreasonable quite incredible.

I've travelled on trains, boats, planes, cars and bikes while they were in nappies and never would have dreamed of performing the task of changing a dirty nappy on a train carriage table or a restaurant table(I reference restaurant tables because others up thread proclaim that this is acceptable too). I know I have never done so. But I have assessed the situation and either waited until I have got off or moved to a location where we will not cause offence. None of my children have had sores on their bottoms or uti or any problem at all.

They are exceptionally well mannered, polite and considerate of others - they know what is and what is not appropriate in a public setting and to make a distinction between that and a private setting.

But it takes all sorts I suppose.

SantasLittleMonkeyButler Sun 16-Mar-14 12:47:52

What is wrong with people? confused

I assume that the poo was contained within the nappy & wipes and placed in a nappy sack or other suitable bag? In which case, it is not dirty or disgusting for anyone. And the smell of shit is the smell of shit - whether from a nappy being changed or from a nappy left in situ for the entire journey!

OP - not disgusting at all. I have done it several times. I always try to find a discreet spot, and ask anyone who is near if they mind. If they did (I've never come across someone who did mind) I would move to another spot.

Toilets on trains are not always big enough, and I'm not kneeling on the floor of a pissy toilet to change a nappy anyway. I can't change a nappy on my lap.

crazy88 Sun 16-Mar-14 12:25:25

It is not acceptable to change a nappy on a table. Corridor between carriages or other out of the way place would have been better but like others have said if there were no toilets I would loudly ask the conductor where I could change the nappy.

squishysquirmy Sun 16-Mar-14 12:19:11

YWNBU, you had no choice and as you describe it you did everything you could to minimise the discomfort to other passengers.

OhMerGerd I regularly travel by train, as you do, and can assure you that there is more than one type of train design - obviously the one the OP was on did not have such a convenient place to change the nappy as you describe. As for changing it on the luggage rack - you really think changing it on top of someone elses suitcase is more considerate? As for your comment about changing babies in the middle of the night - no, they do not have alarms in their PJs to alert their parents to a pooy nappy, the crying is enough.

Chunderella Sun 16-Mar-14 12:00:59

Do babies generally poo in the night and then sleep through it, then? DD has never done this. The only overnight shits have been during feeds. I thought humans didn't tend to poo in their sleep, but no doubt if she did she'd cry soon enough. As for wet nappies, they're something that needs dealing with urgently if they're full.

You also need to not bracket trains and restaurant tables in together. They're not the same thing, in the slightest.

OhMerGerd Sun 16-Mar-14 11:53:23

Good heavens. What happens during the night when all babies wet their nappies or poop? Do they have alarms in their pjs which alert the parents who then leap out of bed within 10 mins to an hour? Or are all these parents staying awake on shift to ensure that soiling is immediately dealt with?
No of course not! A wet nappy is not an emergency and a poo nappy can be dealt with more discreetly.

If you regularly travel by train as I do you will also know that frequently those in between bits are used as seating areas when the trains are full so I doubt anyone is going mind the few minutes it takes to change a nappy. If no in between bit why not move to the luggage rack? Or just wait till you get off?
Come on. It does not do a cause any good to argue for the indefensible. Changing poo nappies on trains and restaurants tables where you are in confined space and close proximity to other passengers / diners is disgusting.

chateauferret Sun 16-Mar-14 11:46:38

The person in charge on a railway train is the conductor. It is his job to determine what pax behaviour is and is not U, based on the Conditions of Carriage. If Cowbag-face had a problem, she should have referred it to him. Clearly, she would have received short shrift.

Does it say in the Conditions of Carriage, "thou shalt refrain from changing thy baby's nappy, yea even though he may have pooed and stinketh unto the highest vaults of Heaven, and even though he hath a sore arse?" No, it does not.

YAFNBU.

chateauferret Sun 16-Mar-14 11:40:54

The person in charge on a railway train is the conductor. It is his job to determine what pax behaviour is and is not U, based on the Conditions of Carriage. If Cowbag-face had a problem, she should have referred it to him. Clearly, she would have received short shrift.

Does it say in the Conditions of Carriage, "thou shalt refrain from changing thy baby's nappy, yea even though he may have pooed and stinketh unto the highest vaults of Heaven, and even though he hath a sore arse?" No, it does not.

YAFNBU.

chateauferret Sun 16-Mar-14 11:38:53

The person in charge on a railway train is the conductor. It is his job to determine what pax behaviour is and is not U, based on the Conditions of Carriage. If Cowbag-face had a problem, she should have referred it to him. Clearly, she would have received short shrift.

chateauferret Sun 16-Mar-14 11:38:19

The person in charge on a railway train is the conductor. It is his job to determine what pax behaviour is and is not U, based on the Conditions of Carriage. If Cowbag-face had a problem, she should have referred it to him. Clearly, she would have received short shrift.

chateauferret Sun 16-Mar-14 11:37:20

The person in charge on a railway train is the conductor. It is his job to determine what pax behaviour is and is not U, based on the Conditions of Carriage. If Cowbag-face had a problem, she should have referred it to him. Clearly, she would have received short shrift.

Chunderella Sun 16-Mar-14 11:18:20

Actually those virgin intercity trains sometimes have an area where you can leave bikes. If that was empty, it might be a place to change a nappy with minimal inconvenience to others. Most trains don't have that though, including the one OP was on.

Chunderella Sun 16-Mar-14 11:11:11

Yeah, I'm not sure it would be minimising the inconvenience to other passengers to change the nappy in the adjoining bit. Not all trains have them anyway, but some that do are very narrow. It might also be considered a fire hazard to block an exit in that way. I know people sometimes stand in doorways and exits when the train is busy, but I've seen people be asked to move away when there's room to go elsewhere. Which makes me think the train company probably wouldn't have been thrilled if OP had unnecessarily blocked a fire exit.

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