To ask you to consider signing up to the Organ Donor Register?

(6 Posts)
DrSeuss Sat 08-Mar-14 09:24:20

Not looking to start an argument. If it's not for you, that's fine. If it is something you would feel able to, please do. Today is the fifteenth anniversary of a dear friend getting a second chance. She has used that second chance to work in the NHS, at the sharp end, dealing with some of the most challenging patients. Maybe someday your decision will give someone else a second chance?
www.organdonation.nhs.uk/how_to_become_a_donor/

JeanSeberg Sat 08-Mar-14 21:58:04

I'm already registered but bumping for you.

Great story about your friend, hope you have a celebration planned.

PortofinoRevisited Sat 08-Mar-14 21:59:20

I am in Belgium. I have to opt out. I didn't and dh knows my wishes. It's the way it should be in mho.

MooMaid Sat 08-Mar-14 22:00:02

Already on it as is DH smile

PleaseNoMoreMinecraft Sat 08-Mar-14 23:40:55

My Dad is alive purely because someone signed an organ donor card and gave him a heart, and we will always be incredibly grateful both to the donor and that the donor's family upheld his decision and despite what must have been terrible grief still allowed the hospital to use his organs.

Mt Dad was always slim, reasonably fit and healthy, but he caught a virus which left scar tissue in the muscle around his heart which slowly caused it to die.

Six months after he caught the virus, on Christmas Eve, we were told to say goodbye to him as he wouldn't make it to New Year - he was emaciated and weak and could barely raise his head. This was at the age of 60. My Mum, sisters and brother and myself (despite being 3 months pregnant) stayed at his bedside around the clock, and somehow he made it to New Year and got just a little bit stronger.

A few days later, the call about a viable and tissue-matched heart came through, and within hours he was in theatres being operated on. We had to say goodbye (again) before he went in as there was no guarantee he'd get through the op, but he did, and quickly already looked so much stronger. His cheeks looked rosy again, and he was sitting up within a few hours.

That was over ten years ago. He not only saw his first grandchild, but five more (so far). Him and his gentle humour and patience are still around, and we are all so happy to still have him.

He's just one of the people saved by the same donor. I think in all seven or eight of his organs were used, so I very much suspect my family wasn't the only one touched by this generous act. Of course, we all carry our donor cards and would do the same thing to pass it forward if we ever had the chance because we know how much it would mean to so many people.

freerangeeggs Sat 08-Mar-14 23:59:29

My friend died five years ago at only 24. His heart and liver were donated and it gave his family a lot of comfort. They handed out donor cards at his funeral and told everyone about how he'd saved two people's lives.

Can I mention the Anthony Nolan bone marrow register too? You can donate while you're alive. It's a bit of effort to get on the register (you can order a swab from their website) but it's a great charity. I always make sure my details are up to date because you never know when someone will need you. They need young men especially badly at the moment.

I'm considering donating my brain to the Brain Trust. An excellent specimen IMO

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