To think WTF?! Do I really have to pay £18 a month to insure my LL's cooker?

(38 Posts)
SackAndCrack Fri 07-Mar-14 19:45:13

Im so pissed off.

In fact Im only mildy pissed off. Im very tired of the hurdles an agency is making me jump over to simply live in a simple flat.

The latest being that I have to sign the tenancy agreement. Behind it is a thick form for contents insurance. It insures mine and my LL's contents.

I already have contents insurance which I intended to carry over, and the LL has NO contents except a cooker.

So I have to pay £18 a month to insure their fucking cooker?

Its a SHIT cooker too. I was planning on getting a better one.

Seems I have no choice, its written in my, currently unsigned, contract.

Ive handed my notice in for this place, I told them its definitely happening now, Im supposed to get the keys on Monday, and they totally neglected to tell me about this.

I know its only £18 a month but Ive already got the cheapest possible property in town which us beyond my means, Im moving out of this place because of an increase of rent. I was supposed to pay X amount each month with my own far cheaper contents insurance. And now they are adding this on.

Pipbin Sat 08-Mar-14 11:11:29

MissingMum I was only 20 at the time and was moving 200 miles. I just wanted to get the keys and get unpacked. If it had been me now it would be very different.

familygermsareok Sat 08-Mar-14 09:57:29

I am a LL, though not very experienced. I have landlord insurance which covers my property. You should not be having to pay for any cover yourself, except to insure your own things, which is nothing to do with the letting agency.

I have discovered that the letting agency I use have been trying it on with the tenants without informing me. I have intervened when I have been contacted by tenants. Maybe the landlord is unaware of this? Could be worth contacting him/her direct.

Thumbwitch Sat 08-Mar-14 05:18:57

I am a LL. I have my own insurance on the cooker, as it's a fixture in the property. It is separate from the house buildings insurance, obviously - but it is in my name as it is my cooker, not the tenants'.

Is there an agent managing the house? talk to them, if the cooker is really crap and you were going to get your own, then you could discuss having the LL remove the old one; but then the house would be without a cooker, which makes it a bit tricky to re-let.

I don't think you should be insuring the LL's cooker whatever, I can't see how that is correct at all.

munchkinmaster Sat 08-Mar-14 05:14:01

I have landlords contents for the flat I rent out. It's not great cover as it doesn't cover the tenants nicking the stuff or wrecking if (really only fire and flood). It is cheap though - about £90 per year.

Your agency is scamming you. If he wants to insure his stuff it's up to him.

Boleh Sat 08-Mar-14 04:53:27

You can't insure someone else's property. Do not sign anything that suggests you can/should.

The landlord does need to insure his/her own contents though - contents is literally everything not nailed down, eg curtains, carpets, light fittings. When I had a flood some of the flooring that was damaged was building and some was contents - so it's not just the cooker.

missingmumxox Sat 08-Mar-14 03:19:32

You know *pit bin*you should have gone inside signed and then cancelled under the 14 day cooling off period you get when you sign in your home smile
Also may I suggest a title "an insurance already bad, but made worse...on purpose" lol
Go on I am right arn't I ? Don't be bleak ;)

BerylStreep Sat 08-Mar-14 00:29:50

Definitely wrong

Pipbin Sat 08-Mar-14 00:22:05

I had exactly the same about 15 years ago.
Turned up on the door of the agents to get the keys. Worldly goods in a van outside. Was told I couldn't have the keys until I paid £100 for contents insurance. What choice did I have?

Caitlin17 Sat 08-Mar-14 00:07:15

You can't insure something which doesn't belong to you.

If you are in Scotland it is illegal to ask you to pay that. All payments other than rent and a maximum of 2 months' deposit were made illegal under The Private Rented Housing (Scotland) Act 2011.

Irishmummy1981 Fri 07-Mar-14 23:57:23

You cant insure something you dont own, ie you can insure your car but not your neighbours, you must have insurable interest, its one of the principles of insurance. I would really question it and get the agency to confirm in writing why you need to insure something you dont own and therefore cant claim on.

FunkyBoldRibena Fri 07-Mar-14 23:01:35

To claim you'd have to produce proof of purchase which you can't as you didn't buy it, hence you can't insure it.

missingmumxox Fri 07-Mar-14 22:54:10

LL are responsible for their own cover, I am also a land lord and rent, I used to have 3 property's and had my own contents insurance as the tenents contents only cover their stuff.
So built in kitchen units are not covered by buildings insurence and do not belong to the tenents.

We had to take out the LA contents on signing £48 a month!!! I took it out just to get the stuff signed and immediately cancelled it and took my own out.

The "warned" us they would be told if we canceled it but I never heard a word back, I assume at that price tha LA get a kick back from the company?

NearTheWindymill Fri 07-Mar-14 21:13:25

I didn't suggest they were. I was suggesting that the £18 might cover more than the cooker if the OP thought about it. Sorry if I was unclear. We are LLords too but all insurances are rolled into the rents rather than charged separately.

trufflehunterthebadger Fri 07-Mar-14 20:51:49

nearthewindymill, we are LLs. We are also tenants. The LLs property in our house (carpets, curtains, cooker, wood burner etc) are not covered under our household contents, neither are the contents in our mortgaged property

specialsubject Fri 07-Mar-14 20:50:25

this comes under the 'unenforceable contract terms' thing. You can't insure it, it doesn't belong to you. Tell them where to go. They don't want you to not rent the place, empty properties cost money.

your insurance covers your contents, and you may want to get an accidental damage clause to protect your deposit if you accidentally damage carpets etc. But you don't have to.

what does the landlord say?

if you want the cooker removed, negotiate that. You can't get rid of landlord property.

kim147 Fri 07-Mar-14 20:42:54

Never heard of that before and I've rented loads of times.

Their cooker, their insurance.

Pobblewhohasnotoes Fri 07-Mar-14 20:39:34

The cooker is not your responsibility. Apart from looking after it.

snakeandpygmy Fri 07-Mar-14 20:32:56

Almost certainly an unfair contract term - which means it won't be enforceable - the OFT has guidance leaflets which you should be able to find online. Google OFT 381

SavoyCabbage Fri 07-Mar-14 20:30:29

I agree with sometimes. You can't get rid of the cooker and get your own so that the ll has no cooker. You shouldn't have to insure their things though.

bochead Fri 07-Mar-14 20:29:11

Tell em it's cheaper to rent one from Brighthouse wink

NearTheWindymill Fri 07-Mar-14 20:27:46

When you say there's nothing in the flat - curtains? carpets? doors? some kitchen furniture is debateable whether covered by buildings/contents insurance? If any of those things were damaged you would be expected to cover the cost. Why don't you see if you can get the cover cheaper and if so offer to pay the equivalent of that.

SackAndCrack Fri 07-Mar-14 20:26:00

I will happily sign the contract saying I have my own contents insurance as this is already happening.

I had no idea that an agency could force you to have contents insurance on your own contents.

Im very confused, this has never happened before. Im seeing them tomorrow anyway and will ask.

Damnautocorrect Fri 07-Mar-14 20:21:48

I thought you had to sign to say you had contents cover on the understanding ll has building only. This sounds a whole new bull shit scheme agents are using to make money.

SometimesLonely Fri 07-Mar-14 20:20:54

Can you really get rid of your Landlord's cooker and replace it? It's not yours to get rid of is it? And if you do replace it, you would not be able to take your new one away when you move out.

Cigarettesandsmirnoff Fri 07-Mar-14 20:20:45

Back out now op

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