To home ed my dd

(213 Posts)
Mishmashfamily Fri 31-Jan-14 20:16:01

After reading posts and posts about unhappy kids/parents at school I'm really considering it. Also I hate the fact that strangers that are apparently 'in charge' of our educational welfare can dictate when we take our children away, what they are taught ect....

I came out of the school system with nothing and had to learn every thing through college , taking courses. I think I could do a better job.

Would you do it?

LifeIsForTheLiving Sun 02-Feb-14 00:30:52

Whitefonia you sound like you have a massive chip on your shoulder to be frank. You take exception to me using the words 'home educate', so i'll replace them with 'teach'.

My children go to school. I also teach them at home.

I have no desire to be a 'formal' full time home educator - you mention that you set a curriculum, make lesson plans, mark work. I can't think of many things i'd rather do less tbh.

I take exception to the underlying tone from some home educators like yourself, that only those children who do not go to school get the chance to follow their interests, expand their knowledge and learn things outside of the nc.

That is not the case. I see school as an extra positive for my children. They get all the benefits of attending - educational, socialising with others on a daily basis, learning to follow rules and read social cues, gaining independence from the family unit and taking part in large team activities, plays, productions, class trips.

They get all of that plus they get the additional chance to expand their learning at home in whatever way they wish, with no curriculum, plans or marking taking up my time.

I agree with what a pp said...the school do not educate my dc for me, they educate them with me. A huge difference.

My dc attend school for 32 hours a week. They spend the other 136 hours of that week at home. For you to say that schools are solely responsible for educating my children for me is not only incorrect but ridiculous.

whitefonia Sun 02-Feb-14 01:45:29

I was thinking the same about you, with regard to chips on shoulders, Lifeisfortheliving...

My children go to school. I also teach them at home.

Like every parent in the country, then (including all types of home educator). So probably needless to say, no? Certainly nothing out of the ordinary.

"For you to say that schools are solely responsible for educating my children for me is not only incorrect but ridiculous."

Though it may suit, please don't put words into my mouth. I mentioned 'bulk of' and 'school full time' I also agreed that most parents 'teach' outside of full time school (and outside of whichever 'method' of home ed. they use).

"I see school as an extra positive for my children. They get all the benefits of attending - educational, socialising with others on a daily basis, learning to follow rules and read social cues, gaining independence from the family unit and taking part in large team activities, plays, productions, class trips."

Same as home education hmm

whitefonia Sun 02-Feb-14 01:46:46

"I take exception to the underlying tone from some home educators like yourself, that only those children who do not go to school get the chance to follow their interests, expand their knowledge and learn things outside of the nc."

I haven't said anything of the kind. Not even remotely. Please point out where.

whitefonia Sun 02-Feb-14 01:50:08

"They get all of that plus they get the additional chance to expand their learning at home in whatever way they wish, with no curriculum, plans or marking taking up my time."

This takes up my time only (usually late evening), it doesn't take up any of the children's time whatsoever. Obviously you don't know me or how HE has worked for us, but thank you for guessing.

whitefonia Sun 02-Feb-14 01:57:52

"I have no desire to be a 'formal' full time home educator - you mention that you set a curriculum, make lesson plans, mark work. I can't think of many things i'd rather do less tbh."

Like many home educators, then (thinking of unschoolers who I greatly admire).

Oh, I used 'formally' with reference to the LA, meaning officially, which could be applied to all types of home educator (We wouldn't describe our educational provision as 'formal' but structured. Even then it doesn't resemble a school).

TamerB Sun 02-Feb-14 07:30:39

I think that the argument has taken a rather silly turn as if we are scoring points as to who does more with their children!
They are learning. Some totally at home, some go out for a few hours each day. As long as people are happy with their choice I can't see why we need to nit pick over terms.
I see it in a similar way to LifeIsForLiving.

streakybacon Sun 02-Feb-14 08:18:54

When my son was at school, he would come home each day a gibbering wreck, completely incapable of any after-school activities. School destroyed him. It simply wasn't possible to 'do other stuff' outside of school hours and he really only gets 24 hours in his day now because of HE.

TamerB Sun 02-Feb-14 09:11:18

An obvious candidate for HE. One system can never suit all. Some are not suited by schools and some are not suited by HE.

TamerB Sun 02-Feb-14 09:12:57

I expect my brother would have suited HE, it wouldn't have been an excuse for my parents to then extend it to the whole family regardless, when school suited us.

HamletsSister Sun 02-Feb-14 15:48:43

But at school, I teach my children one subject (core, important) and yet today, at home, I was teaching my son Latin - a subject not available at school but one he decided to follow in his own time.

So, I am doing both. Really HE brigade.....we ALL teach our children. I am particularly proud of the fact that my Sciottish children both say "bloody hell" in a posh English accent (mine) - they definitely didn't learn that at school!

cory Sun 02-Feb-14 16:55:23

Bizarrely, my dd is learning far from more from me now that she is back in full time education: she was unhappy at home and it made her very negative about her chances to learn anything at all; it certainly damaged to her willingness to learn from me.

Which just goes to show that all children are different, circumstances are different, families are different- but everybody learns best when they are happy.

streakybacon Sun 02-Feb-14 17:14:07

Which just goes to show that all children are different, circumstances are different, families are different- but everybody learns best when they are happy

This.

I wish we could all just recognise that there is no single approach that suits every child. We all do what's best for our own.

TamerB Sun 02-Feb-14 17:33:47

I wish we could all just recognise that there is no single approach that suits every child. We all do what's best for our own.

And so say all of us! (I don't think anyone could argue with that).

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