To be terrified of being ill when out with baby

(17 Posts)
2tiredtoScare Wed 06-Nov-13 08:38:06

My DM once had a massive panic attack whilst driving us home, she got us there safely but never drove again. Anxiety can be so crippling

kelda Wed 06-Nov-13 08:35:25

MAny sympathies. Not quite the same but when I was out with my three children at the park, I started to get a migraine, including flashing lights in front of my eyes. I could barely see. Somehow adrenaline managed to get us home safely.

2tiredtoScare Wed 06-Nov-13 08:32:10

Oh Raisah, thats awful but I can sympathise

raisah Wed 06-Nov-13 03:45:08

Also in case of diarrhoea/vomitting accidents I would agree with Bundaberg & keep an emergency bag with you. Include a pack of wet toilet wipes which are essential for diarrhoea aswell as cleaning up vomit. Also pack a pair of knickers & socks/tights.

raisah Wed 06-Nov-13 03:41:12

I had a massive anxiety attack last year when walking home with my.dc from the cm who lives 10min walk away. It felt like a heart attack, I had shooting pains up my arms, very tight chest pains, hyperventilation and I collapsed as soon as I walked in through the door. It was terrifying, I have no idea how I managed to walk home with my dc who were screaming. I was slumped on the floor for an hour, I tried ringing my neighbour but she was engaged. I should have called the ambulance but I could barely speak.

wigglesrock Tue 05-Nov-13 21:47:08

You cope, you really do. I'm not being flippant, but something kicks in - you make the baby safe & do the best you can. Ring for some help (I've had to pick a friend up in similar circumstances), you push yourself to get home and let it all go. As suggested I kept a pair of knickers, leggings, scarf in my baby bag. I was really vomitus during my pregnancies and had a supply of plastic bags in the car and in coat pockets.

bundaberg Tue 05-Nov-13 19:58:26

if you're anxious about it then how about keeping a little emergency pack of stuff in your changing bag?
clean underwear, thin skirt (thinking small to pack here!), bag in case you need to be sick into it, towel or a couple of muslins?

Brittabot Tue 05-Nov-13 19:54:39

I had gall stones after DS2 was born, the most excruciating pain and nausea I have ever experienced, and on a few occasions I had attacks while out with both children and had to look after them while my DH raced home from work. You do what you have to, and it's amazing what you can do when there's no other option!

spritesoright Tue 05-Nov-13 19:39:02

It is awful being sick with a little one. You realise acutely how vulnerable you are and how dependant they are on you.
I wasn't sick on public transport but had horrible food poisoning when DH was away for a few days and could barely function. DD was still small and I just had to rely on friends as no other family around. My brilliant friend stayed over and even got up with DD in the night to feed her.

spritesoright Tue 05-Nov-13 19:38:35

It is awful being sick with a little one. You realise acutely how vulnerable you are and how dependant they are on you.
I wasn't sick on public transport but had horrible food poisoning when DH was away for a few days and could barely function. DD was still small and I just had to rely on friends as no other family around. My brilliant friend stayed over and even got up with DD in the night to feed her.

Florabeebaby Tue 05-Nov-13 19:36:29

I agree Bundaberg..no ambulance as it is not life threatening.
Strap baby safely and do what you can for yourself as best as you can.

My DD was about 15 months and I was pg with DS with horrible sickness...it happened to me a few times and I just literally threw up in the bushes a few times, there was no stopping it.

It's awful but as long as your baby is safely in a buggy or stroller, you can sort yourself.

But don't worry, unlikely it will happen again!

monkeynuts123 Tue 05-Nov-13 19:36:13

Thanks for the feedback to not overthink it. I have already felt a bit panicky about it but realised if it did happen it would be a one off very unusual situation. I just don't know how anyone would look after baby at same time if out.

bundaberg Tue 05-Nov-13 19:32:19

don't call an ambulance for sickness and diarrhoea!!!

you would strap baby into pram and do whatever you would do if you were by youtself... find a loo, clean yourzelf up, get home i guess?
call someone to pick you up? worst case, try and buy some towels and get a taxi??

horrid situation to find yourself in, but not life threatening

2tiredtoScare Tue 05-Nov-13 19:27:11

What a horrible experience, try not to worry about it too much as you could give yourself a panic complex about it IYSWIM I have IBS and wound myself up so much about public transport it took me years to work through my panic about it thanks

elliejjtiny Tue 05-Nov-13 19:26:04

You'd strap the baby/toddler in the buggy and then do whatever you would do if caught ill suddenly on your own. Probably get yourself to the nearest public loo and phone someone to come and get you.

atomicyoghurt Tue 05-Nov-13 19:25:57

If you can't call dh you call ambulance. I had an episode where I fainted when dd1 was about 5 months. I had to just go in a shop and say help me and then fainted. It was a hair dressers and they were great.

monkeynuts123 Tue 05-Nov-13 19:22:12

A few days ago I was in London on tube with baby/toddler when I started feeling sick. I had a long tube journey and an overhead train journey to do. I felt sick the whole way and when I got home I had violent vomiting and diarrhea for 12 hours, probably bastard norovirus. Anyway, thinking back I am wondering what on earth I would have done if it had kicked off when I was on tube or train far from home. How would I have cared for baby when I had it from both ends (sorry tmi) and could barely stand up. Has anything similar ever happened to anyone and what hell did you do? DH said you'd have to call an ambulance, what on earth would anyone suggest?

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