Note: Please bear in mind that whilst this topic does canvass opinions, it is not a fight club. You may disagree with other posters but we do ask you please to stick to our Talk Guidelines and to be civil. We don't allow personal attacks or troll-hunting. Do please report any. Thanks, MNHQ.

to think that school are being petty about black ink and handwriting pens

(93 Posts)
muminthenorthwest Sat 12-Oct-13 18:30:07

DS, 9, is left handed and having trouble with smudging his work as he writes (I am LH and had the same until I worked out how to write at an angle).

have bought a left-handed, quick-drying pen for him to try out, but have been told now that he can't use it as it is blue ink, not black. FFS.

queried it (there were no black ones available) and was told that they 'have' to write in black in books.

Possibly blue would be ok for writing on walls then?

AIBU to want to have a major rant about petty, pedantic rules (with no logical reason to them) stifling creativity and individuality in children and adults alike?!

I'd have thought it better to write neatly in blue than it looking like a drunken spider trail in black. But what do I know? I'm just the parent.

Poor DS is dreading parents' evening as he thinks I'm going to throw a wobbler. It's a possibility.

Gileswithachainsaw Mon 14-Oct-13 23:09:51

I realise it was four pages ago but I agree with mswilliamthebloody

How can smudges be preferable to blue ink. Ffs

LadybirdsEverywhere Mon 14-Oct-13 23:02:36

This bizarre, controlling attitude to stationery drives me nuts. The kids turn up to secondary school in year seven too afraid to turn the page without my permission and keep sticking their hand in the air to ask if they're allowed to write with x-coloured pen. They look at me with wide eyes when I tell them that they should make their own choices about stationery and use their initiative about turning the page.

dollybird Mon 14-Oct-13 22:23:38

we had this with DS a couple of years ago. He was meant to have blue but had black. We were only told they needed handwriting pens, and he was made to borrow someone else's. I wrote her a letter asking what difference it made and why should someone else have to provide a pen just to suit them when he had perfectly good black pens (they mark in red so that's not the issue). She did reply but still didn't answer the question about what difference it made.

Same as the other week DS was making cupcakes at school. We realised the night before it said muffin cases but we only had the smaller cupcake ones. We sent him with proportionally less ingredients slight oversight on the marg too so he could make 12 small cakes. They said he had to use muffin cases and he borrowed some off someone else and made 12 small cakes in giant muffin cases hmm. Were delicious though grin

nicename Sun 13-Oct-13 11:55:00

I remember once handing in an essay written in orange ink (I was about 12). Bless her, the teacher did mark it but asked that I used a 'traditional' colour in future. I used purple after that.

sashh Sun 13-Oct-13 11:25:59

Highlighting - we have 'pink for think' and 'green for go'.

So useful for the colour blind kids.

superstarheartbreaker Sun 13-Oct-13 08:22:07

Good old red pen for marking imo. All this fear of using the red= ridiculous!

DD1 had a new teacher in Y5 who insisted (on pain of detentions) that all work was done in black ink. The school office sold only blue ink pens. He wouldn't listen to reason, so I set the dragon school secretary on him.

Next day it was blue ink all round grin.

englishteacher78 Sun 13-Oct-13 07:58:24

We have a marking policy but it doesn't involve colours and if I used highlighters on my sixth form work they would laugh! They do love reward stickers though!

Fuzzysnout Sun 13-Oct-13 05:33:19

Just buy him a black one FFS. It's really not hard in the days of the Internet. Save your fuss for something that actually is a problem.

Fakebook Sun 13-Oct-13 01:20:03

what about this?

or this?

Tbh, if he's been using black ink up until now, they'll just want him to go back to using his old pen again. I'd try to adhere to school rules, it must be for a reason.

Sinful1 Sun 13-Oct-13 00:50:59

What's all this about multiple colours for marking?

I remember we wrote in blue or black (but they didn't care much if you used anything) teachers normally used red but again could use anything.

The way we knew what was our writing, the teachers or some other kids was being able to recognize our own hand writing.

neverputasockinatoaster Sun 13-Oct-13 00:48:06

Salmotrutta - I'd move in a heartbeat. My dad lives in the Western Highlands and I grew up on the East Coast.

I miss Scotland.

Sadly DH has a very specialised job with very few openings anywhere........

One day I shall live in a house on the coast somewhere and home ed my children....

Salmotrutta Sun 13-Oct-13 00:42:08

Move up here.

SMT would no more worry about your rulers than I would.

neverputasockinatoaster Sun 13-Oct-13 00:39:24

Nottingahmshire.

Salmotrutta Sun 13-Oct-13 00:38:17

Where are you neverputasock?

neverputasockinatoaster Sun 13-Oct-13 00:36:09

Trusted to be professional and capable?

Mwah ha ha ha! Not where I work. Dear lordy no. I was recently graded as inadequate because I used rulers the member of the SMT deemed to be unsuitable......... (May just have outed myself there!)

Salmotrutta Sun 13-Oct-13 00:33:47

My impression is (and correct me if I'm wrong but I have worked with several teachers who have worked in Scotland and England) that we are generally trusted to be professional and capable of doing our job up here in Scotland.
So we don't tend to be micro-managed at such a ridiculous level.
Head teachers checking exercise books for pen colour!?

Most teachers up here would be outraged if a Head or SMT member swooped in to "check up".

neverputasockinatoaster Sun 13-Oct-13 00:33:34

noblegiraffe - we have to put a v in a circle along with a summary of what we said.........

And, if we do practical work we either have to take pictures as evidence and stick them in the books or we have to go through each book, write the date and a note about what we did...........

Each book a child uses has to have a copy of the marking code stuck in the front of it......

Years ago we used to tick and sometimes we'd write good or even very good. The kids took as much notice of it then as they do now....

noblegiraffe Sun 13-Oct-13 00:16:17

We have to write "Verbal Feedback" if we talk to a kid about their work, simply so that if someone should check the book it can be seen to have been done.

It's pretty bloody insulting to be trusted so little.

ChippingInNeedsSleepAndCoffee Sun 13-Oct-13 00:07:15

I thank fuck, pretty much every day at the moment, that I didn't go into teaching as I had planned to. I'd have killed someone by now and it would not have been one of the kids. FFS it's all so bloody ridiculous!

ChippingInNeedsSleepAndCoffee Sun 13-Oct-13 00:02:58

There's a marking policy for every day work - for teachers?

Fucking hell, it's no wonder it's all going to the dogs - it's a wonder there are any teachers left.

neverputasockinatoaster Sat 12-Oct-13 23:56:13

Oh yes! We had to stop marking in red because it was bad for self esteem.......

We now have to mark in blue....

Some kids work still gets covered in blue ink mind......

Sigh.

MidniteScribbler Sat 12-Oct-13 23:49:24

At my previous school the head tried to dictate that we should stop marking in red pen before he thought it might affect student's self esteem! Apparently we should use a more "inspirational" pink or green instead.

Ummm no.

NoComet Sat 12-Oct-13 23:31:11

Black ink is preferred at secondary, and maths has some extraordinarily complex system that involves owning black green and red Biro's and smoke coming from miss's ears when you don't have them.

DD1 got so fed up of one boy borrowing her pens she stomped off to the library and bought him a green and red biro (library sells pens, rulers and protractors very cheaply).

As for marking, I realise I'm a bad parent as I never look in their books. DD2 would explode if I did.

DDs confess they often don't look back and read the marking anyway.

SilverApples Sat 12-Oct-13 23:18:58

I think this thread has done a lot for the customer to understand how truly insane and limiting this one small aspect of classroom practice can be.
Now, multiply this by a thousand and fifteen, and you have our day.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now