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Why do you think behaviour in schools is so much worse than even 10 yrs ago.

(590 Posts)
soul2000 Thu 03-Oct-13 18:22:34

This is not a joke thread. I am generally interested as to how much the standard of behaviour has deteriated in the last 25 years since i left school.

What amazes me, is that teachers are not shocked when watching programes like educating yorkshire, that just shows how bad the behaviour of some pupils is.

Another shocking thing is that pupils who in my time would have been labeled a menace "ME INCLUDED" are now seen as upstanding pupils.

How has the standard fallen so far and what can be done to re address the balance.

This thread is in support of teachers.

HeySoulSister Thu 03-Oct-13 18:24:29

Who said standards have fallen? Is there a link?

FlapJackOLantern Thu 03-Oct-13 18:24:44

I will not watch Waterloo Road because I am horrified at the behaviour.

Give teachers some discipline tools and methods. And carry them through.

curlew Thu 03-Oct-13 18:25:18

Do you have any evidence that it has?

TheFallenMadonna Thu 03-Oct-13 18:26:18

Waterloo Rd is fictional...

JustinBsMum Thu 03-Oct-13 18:26:26

lack of funding to provide somewhere for disruptive pupils to go.

3littlefrogs Thu 03-Oct-13 18:26:47

I think you only have to look at the attitude and behaviour of some parents and you have the answer.

sassytheFIRST Thu 03-Oct-13 18:27:17

I've taught throughout that period and while behaviour is undoutedly worse than when I was at school (left in 1990) it hasn't got worse in the last ten years IMO.

Waterloo Road is fiction BTW, using that to judge schools is like assuming every person who lives within earshot of Bow Bells doesn't own a washing machine and goes to the pub every night!

FlapJackOLantern Thu 03-Oct-13 18:29:14

Waterloo Rd is fictional... - but children watch it and behave the same ! So, by that theory, let's blame the producers of TV programmes for the bad behaviour, yes?

soul2000 Thu 03-Oct-13 18:29:19

Soul sister. Clam in her last thread on the other thread about the
private sector, says how behaviour standards are shocking now.

I am sure many teachers agree with clam that behaviour that would not be tolerated even 5-7 years ago is now " managed".

I know about this because my friends, that are teachers tell me this.

Renniehorta Thu 03-Oct-13 18:31:00

3littlefrogs I think that you have nailed it!

You see lack of support for schools/teachers all over this website. If authority is undermined by parents there is not much that a classroom teacher can do. Especially as they know that they will rarely get any support from senior management.

curlew Thu 03-Oct-13 18:31:23

The behaviour in Tom Brown's Schooldays is pretty dreadful. And think about William Brown, Billy Bunter, Jennings...........and Amy March sold pickled limes to her classmates. Oh, and Anne Shirley broke a slate over Gilbert Blythe's head.

In out area I think ofsted and league tables have been a factor. What has happened rather than most people go to their local secondary those parents that care fight to get their children in the 'better schools' meaning those that care less end up in the worse schools. This then becomes a vicious cycle with results and behaviour extremely poor in some schools (mostly due to parental lack of interest or issues outside of scho) and then good results and behaviour in the better schools. It is hard to break the cycle.

EvilTwins Thu 03-Oct-13 18:31:30

Lack of parental support plays a huge part. When I was at school, most kids were more worried about what their parents would say if they found out they were in trouble at school. I taught a yr9 class today and gave one boy an after school detention for shoving another boy and hurting him in a completely unprovoked attack. The first boy's mum called school to ask what was being done about the second boy because her son "doesn't do" things like that for no reason. Ha. If kids don't get a consistent message about good manners, good behaviour & appropriate choices then it makes it harder.

TheFallenMadonna Thu 03-Oct-13 18:31:37

Eh?

Not sure I follow that.

What makes you think children copy behaviour seen on Waterloo Road?

HeySoulSister Thu 03-Oct-13 18:31:45

Waterloo road is today's kids equivalent to our grange hill!

It's not real you know??

Behaviour hasn't got worse IMO. Maybe teachers have lost the respect? Or at least, lost the tougher options of discipline that we all used to avoid

soul2000 Thu 03-Oct-13 18:32:20

Flatjack. The teachers used to say the kids used to copy "GRANGE HILL"
so no change there then.

SaltaKatten Thu 03-Oct-13 18:32:39

I teach in primary. For a lot of my pupils, if they have misbehaved and have had a consequence as per the school rules, the parent will come in and demand evidence and justification and grumble about it all while the child is listening. Parents are undermining rather than supporting the school's behaviour management. I don't mind parents asking about what's happened and am happy to discuss how we together can support a child in improving his or her behaviour. However, the automatic response that my child is not at fault and mistrust in school is damaging and very wearing.

Jinty64 Thu 03-Oct-13 18:33:44

It's more than 30 years since I left school and there were a fair few badly behaved children then. I don't think the children at the ds's school are any worse behaved. I found educating Yorkshire shocking (I only watched one episode) but there was only one outrageously behaved child in that winding up the others and the whole situation was very poorly managed.

Hulababy Thu 03-Oct-13 18:34:44

I was still teaching secondary 10 years ago. Tbh it was pretty much as it is now ime. Good school was good behaviour, focus on actually teaching. Failing school was awful behaviour, discipline and crowd control main focus. Was physically assaulted by 13 year old just over 11.5 years ago when pregnant with dd. Behaviour was not good throughout the school regardless of teacher at that school. No idea what that particular is like now. Can't be much worse!

WestieMamma Thu 03-Oct-13 18:36:08

I think school size is part of the problem. When I was at school I knew who every teacher was and every teacher, even those I didn't have, knew my name. It's impossible to know every child when there are 1000+ pupils and extremely hard to bring kids in line if you don't know who you're talking to.

FlapJackOLantern Thu 03-Oct-13 18:36:34

Heysoulsister - It's not real you know?? - Really? Really? I am gutted sad

Viviennemary Thu 03-Oct-13 18:38:10

Quite simply behaviour has deteriorated because children know there are no consequences for bad behaviour. And let's not talk lines detention and so on. There are no consequences. And I agree that parents often undermine a school's discipline policy. Like how unfair their poor DC was excluded from some treat when all they did was such and such.

NotYoMomma Thu 03-Oct-13 18:38:31

you are probably comparing your nice average experience with tv shows designed to show the worst classes etc

10 years ago I was just leaving school. there was a range of experiences in different classrooms, most were great/ good/ average - and one or two badly behaved classes.

I dont actually think much has changed.

FlapJackOLantern Thu 03-Oct-13 18:39:45

Well said Viviennemary - right on the button.

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