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To spell/grammar check the statement from the solicitor?

(22 Posts)
EnlightenedOwl Thu 03-Oct-13 12:26:19

If they have been appointed through the Union I'm fairly sure I know which firm of solicitors it is. Better not estimate a guess though in case I get in trouble or something!

WinteronPluto Thu 03-Oct-13 11:23:39

PS - thisvehicleisreversing that doesn't surprise me at all about the police.

However, it is not their main job to use correct English in the same way as it is a lawyer's job.

WinteronPluto Thu 03-Oct-13 11:22:14

Ha ha! this made me laugh because I am a lawyer.
You should definitely spell and grammar check it if it's been don't poorly. Everyone makes some mistakes - typos and so on that you can't detect yourself no matter how many times you read it - but it sounds as if this is in a different league. I would always want some one else (even a secretary or any fresh pair of eyes) to have looked at a document of mine before it went to a client in case of typos.
I would also tell the Union about this.
There is a lot of competition for employment law work (I am not an employment lawyer so no hidden agenda here!) so they should be able to find someone competent for a reasonable price.

Thisvehicleisreversing Thu 03-Oct-13 11:06:16

I had to sign a police statement when we had a theft in the shop I work in. The police officer wrote out what I'd told her then asked me to read it through and sign it.

I had to correct so many spelling mistakes before I could bring myself to sign. grin

The officer was very off with me after I'd done it.

senua Thu 03-Oct-13 08:59:56

I hope that you are telling the Union about this - they ought to know about the lack of standard of work of firms that they are appointing.

EnlightenedOwl Thu 03-Oct-13 08:52:04

Oh no you're right it is very poor and that's why I'm so uptight about these things - what you send out represents the business. That's why I think you've been sent something that shouldn't have gone out - I hope so anyway! My boss would be livid if that came back in and he realised the state it had gone out in. Heads would roll!

FrightRider Wed 02-Oct-13 22:42:54

I just thought it was so unprofessional Owl, i'm not a solicitor or anything special, but i did used to work for an insurance company and i used to have to send out professional, official letters for customers to sign and return.. i'd be horrified if i sent anything like that, especially with the clients name spelled wrong!

I'm expecting to get an amended copy sent back for DH to sign again.. i cant see it being professional to hand over a statement to his employers solicitors with all my corrections on it!

EnlightenedOwl Wed 02-Oct-13 22:30:14

The only other thing I can think of is that I have noticed some (I don't want to get in trouble over this!) paralegals and juniors do not quite have the spelling and grammar skills one would expect and its possible this has been drafted by them. It should then be checked by a solicitor and it is just possible that hasn't happened and shoddy work has gone out

EnlightenedOwl Wed 02-Oct-13 22:27:35

I know ours wouldn't go out like that - I type them and I'm a stickler for this sort of thing, my boss is even more on the ball! I am wondering if this has gone out by mistake. I don't think the signature matters so much if there are clear amendments - what we would do is revise as per the amendments then send it back for re-signing before exchange. I genuinely think this has been sent out in error - not that that is any excuse I know.

nennypops Wed 02-Oct-13 21:45:52

I had a letter in court supposedly from a solicitor but suspected fraud. The dreadful grammar was one of the reasons we thought it was forged.

It's not unknown. A friend of mine who is a solicitor told me that, several months after she saw a client and wrote a letter for him, she was contacted by the CPS because a letter apparently from her had turned up which was relevant to allegations made against the client. It was definitely a forgery, but a very good forgery of their writing paper and her signature. However, having gone to all that trouble, the forger had produced a letter with a terrible typing layout and numerous grammar mistakes. As my friend had hundreds of people willing to testify that she was a known pedant who would rather die than sign a letter like that, she was able to satisfy the police and CPS that she had nothing to do with it.

HandMini Wed 02-Oct-13 21:41:34

Perhaps they have mistakenly printed and sent you a rough draft. That is quite honestly the only explanation I can think of for it being so shoddy.

FrightRider Wed 02-Oct-13 21:39:07

several names spelled wrong, both DHs and a couple of the witnesses, the one section is so bad i've just put a huge question mark by it and said none of it makes sense... as i said, its like short hand... it basically looks like whichever clerk they gave the telephone interview transcript to has got bored and just pasted in the solicitors notes!

i actually wrote "has anyone bothered to proof read this?' on it blush

gallicgirl Wed 02-Oct-13 21:33:29

It should be corrected.

I had a letter in court supposedly from a solicitor but suspected fraud. The dreadful grammar was one of the reasons we thought it was forged.

Euphemia France Wed 02-Oct-13 21:28:39

DH recently paid £25 for a solicitor to notarise a letter where she misspelled his name underneath his signature, crossed it out messily, rewrote it and initialled it.

£25 for a dog's breakfast. angry

MogTheForgetfulCat Wed 02-Oct-13 21:28:05

YANBU - my DH had to sign an indemnity in relation to a (small!) inheritance recently. Even I, who am a solicitor and quite used to the wordy, overly-engineered way of saying something that is actually quite simple, couldn't make head nor tail of it. We rang them and asked them to send one that made sense...

PeppermintPasty Wed 02-Oct-13 21:25:35

Yanbu, and I'm a solicitor.

I used to do PI and I always always always read the statement before sending it out for signing. Absolutely crucial to get it right, in all ways.

No excuses. Very unprofessional.

LessMissAbs Wed 02-Oct-13 21:21:20

How bad can it be? Do share!

I'm assuming its not been proof read or written by a solicitor but is due to their system - I can't see how that can be professionally acceptable by someone who holds a practising certificate!

mycatlikestwiglets Wed 02-Oct-13 21:20:52

YANBU - the statement should reflect your DH's evidence so if he wouldn't have written it with all the errors it's right to have corrected it! I'd ask the solicitor to replace the version he signed with the amended one.

EllaFitzgerald Wed 02-Oct-13 21:20:43

YA definitely NBU. I can't help myself when I see mistakes. I have to sit on my hands.

FrightRider Wed 02-Oct-13 21:18:39

i did tell him not to and to send it back with just the corrections, but he didnt listen!

FrussoNeedsMoreSleep Wed 02-Oct-13 21:16:59

You were bu to have allowed DH sign it at all before they'd corrected the mistakes

FrightRider Wed 02-Oct-13 20:36:42

DH had a nasty accident at work that we're claiming for as his employer was negligent.

The Union appointed solicitor spoke to DH over the phone and then sent him a statement to sign and return detailing the accident, how it happens, his injuries...etc.

The spelling and grammar is atrocious, i don't think they bothered to spell check it, half of it is garbled and doesn't make sense.

So i went through it with a pen and corrected all the spelling mistakes, queried a line that makes no sense at all and corrected several places where words are missing and it looks like they just copied in the short hand notes before i'd let DH sign it. blush

WIBU?

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