where do teachers send their kids

(107 Posts)
teachersaspirations Sun 22-Sep-13 20:54:55

changed my name for this for one as it is potentially a bit hot!

I am beginning to notice that a lot of the teachers who teach our kids, their kids go to the best/better schools
the grammars/the select schools etc...

it would be interesting to know what proportion of parents are teachers for these grammar schools/select schools etc...

PS am not a teacher

Blissx Sun 22-Sep-13 21:13:48

I send mine to local state primary, in London. I only know of one of my teacher friends who sends their's to private, but her husband is a banker. However, I don't go around asking all my colleagues where they send thier children. What is your point, OP?

VinegarDrinker Sun 22-Sep-13 21:13:49

Meant to say, the school DH teaches at is definitely seen as "better" than the one DC will go to. Meh.

I know teachers in private schools who get a substantial discount on fees if they send the child to their school.

Also a teacher will have a better idea than most of the hoops to jump through for different schools - whether this is how to get them up to speed in Maths (although they may not be experts they may know someone who is) or the number of years they need to attend a certain church for. They are just doing what they believe is best for their child like many other parents, they just are better informed.

Hulababy Sun 22-Sep-13 21:14:50

I was a teacher and now work as a HLTA.

My DD goes to a nearby independent school. If she hadn't gone there then she'd have gone to our local state school - both the primary and the secondary are very good ones, with very good results and very good inspections.

I work in a state infant school with a good inspection result, but a far more mixed catchment than our local catchment school.

I wouldn't chose to send DD to my school, when she was smaller, as I would rather her not be in my school at all, nothing to do with the actual school.

Tinlegs Sun 22-Sep-13 21:15:02

What's wrong with having your children at the school where you teach? (Not that I would have a choice anyway).

Blissx Sun 22-Sep-13 21:15:27

their, sorry!

NoComet Sun 22-Sep-13 21:16:50

The two I know, one to the comp in special measures (she teaches at a different comp), the other to grammar (where she teaches).

I don't doubt child A could have got into the grammar.

No idea if this is morals or practicality. DD2 didn't try for the grammar because it's a horribly long day (we are right at the edge of the area).

stillenacht Sun 22-Sep-13 21:18:42

DH and I are teachers. DS1 goes to indie school (had to remortgage 60 grand for that!) as he is not grammar material and alternative fills me with fear. DS2 goes to state special school (SLD) and will do until he is 19.

Wonderstuff Sun 22-Sep-13 21:18:47

I teach in state secondary and know of only one staff member with a child in private ed. My kids will be in local schools, they are good, I have purposefully moved to a nice area, in part because of schools. I don't have any 'inside info' though. Who knows what will happen in the future, dd is in year 1 and DS starts next year.

jacks365 Sun 22-Sep-13 21:19:22

Teachers tend to be higher than average intelligence and better educated therefore their children are often more intelligent and have a good study ethic which means they are more likely to pass an entrance exam for a selective school. Thinking about my daughters group one was the daughter of a uni lecturer and teacher, she also got 6 A/A* at A level so no doubting that she deserved her place. Others parents were solicitors, accountants, company directors etc. and even a couple of lone parents.

Balloonist Sun 22-Sep-13 21:20:05

Dh teaches in a school in a well-off area in which we could not afford to live. Our DC go to the local school in the middle of a large council estate.

teachersaspirations Sun 22-Sep-13 21:20:10

Kim147 Teachers probably have more inside info on schools and make more informed choices, I think this is very true

I dont know where they send their kids, it was just that some of the teachers I do know, or know of, that just seemed to be the case more and more often

sorry if its in the wrong section AIBU

I wasn't referring to private schools

SatinSandals Sun 22-Sep-13 21:20:34

Since here are very few state selective schools left the majority must go to comprehensives but teachers often live some distance from their work.

YoureAllABunchOfBastards Sun 22-Sep-13 21:20:46

To the nearest school.

I did make sure I bought a house in a decent catchment, mind.

Hulababy Sun 22-Sep-13 21:21:51

Tinlegs - it's just not for me. I know others who have had their own children at their schools and who have taught them too. But I prefer for me and DD to be in different schools. We both have our own space that way, especially for DD.

RinkyDinkyDoo Sun 22-Sep-13 21:22:10

I am a teacher and my child goes to a special needs school due to his autism. My teacher friend's children all go to their local state schools. I am the child of a teacher and myself and my brother went to Dad's school, which was private and he got a bit of a discount.
It was mainly ok, but there were kids who said we told tales to dad about what went on,we didn't, and we got in lots of trouble for being quite naughty, dad was mainly unimpressed with that grin

Balloonist Sun 22-Sep-13 21:22:11

"and even a couple of lone parents"

Could they not have been teachers or solicitors too? wink

kim147 Sun 22-Sep-13 21:23:13

"Teachers tend to be higher than average intelligence and better educated therefore their children are often more intelligent and have a good study ethic which means they are more likely to pass an entrance exam for a selective school."

LOL - I wish you could have seen DS this morning when he was arguing and crying for 10 mins thinking about possibly doing his homework.

He's quite bright though. He thinks.

soverylucky Sun 22-Sep-13 21:23:43

They are at primary at the moment. They will go to the local comprehensive. It is not as good as the schools that dh and I teach in but we can't afford private and it is the one we are in the catchment area for.

teachersaspirations Sun 22-Sep-13 21:24:56

Jacks365 Teachers tend to be higher than average intelligence and better educated therefore their children are often more intelligent"

not sure if I agree with how that sounds

I agree about the good study ethic which means they are more likely to pass an entrance exam for a selective school

RinkyDinkyDoo Sun 22-Sep-13 21:25:02

Oh, dad never taught us, he refused. I was in his colleagues geography A level class, my dad did my first homework for me, I got a low grade, dad was the one who set the homework and the grading system for it as well. Dad had words and told the guy he was being unfair, all ok after that.

kim147 Sun 22-Sep-13 21:25:12

" Others parents were solicitors, accountants, company directors etc. and even a couple of lone parents."

Hmm. I know some lone parents who are professionals and earn a reasonable amount of money. Some are even accountants and solicitors.

MakeHayIsAWhaleNow Sun 22-Sep-13 21:25:39

Teachers may well be "reasonably well paid" (not that I have noticed, as both dh and I are teachers) but it's still not enough to - usually - send dcs to private schools unless you teach in the private sector and get a substantial reduction in fees (which certainly does happen). Dh is state, I'm currently neither, dd is going to one of the local state primaries. Not the best (or even one of the 4 best) according to OFSTED and local mothers, but the one that focused on her and concentrated on enjoyment and holistic education rather than SATs results. That was information that anyone could have got just by visiting the school, it was not restricted to teachers.

MidniteScribbler Sun 22-Sep-13 21:26:17

and even a couple of lone parents

I'm a lone parent AND a teacher. We can do more than one thing you know.

londonrach Sun 22-Sep-13 21:26:34

My mum was a teacher and i went to local closest comp. At school best friend was also a treachers daughter. Teacher have no more info re schools than everyone else.

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