To think that cautions for non violent offences committed by children should not show up on a CRB check 20 years later

(32 Posts)
ReallyTired Mon 02-Sep-13 18:56:44

An enhanced CRB check will show any caution that someone has recieved in their life. The criminal age of responsiblity is incredibly low in the UK compared to other countries. An eleven year old might be stupid enough to shop lift and end up with a caution, yet grow up to be a responsible adult.

I feel that serious crimes of a violent or a sexual nature should never be forgotten (even committed as a child.) However does an employer really need to know that a 40 year old stole some sweets from Woollies 30 years ago. I know the arguement is that the 40 year old should disclose the caution and let the employer decide whether its relevent. However some people can be incredibly judgemental.

What has prompted this post. I have been Watching Edcuating Essex on 4Od and young two girls are in trouble for cyber/ text messaging bullying. The girls are incredbily lucky the parents of the victim chose not to go to the police. It made me wonder whether its right that potential a caution recieved as a young teen could wreck someone's career dreams.

lljkk Tue 03-Sep-13 16:22:47

Anyone remember all the elected police something in Britain last year... Police commissioners? Anyway, a load of nominated people in their 50s had to turn down the role because it turned out they had juvenile criminal records. Things like trespassing at the age of 11.

So I am sure these things WILL follow our children thru their lives, sadly.

Goes with living in the Paperwork Age. Very unforgiving.

comingalongnicely Tue 03-Sep-13 15:10:42

Woe betide that choccy bar in the pocket in your teenage years!! On the other hand, if you're Jon Venables it doesn't matter at all as you've been forgiven!!

ILetHimKeep20Quid Tue 03-Sep-13 13:34:10

If in doubt, declare. You will look a hundrerd times worse if you don't and it does show.

PolterGoose Tue 03-Sep-13 06:30:36

Juliet the whole thing is over complicated. Ring NACRO helpline for up to date advice smile

When it says "Convictions which did not result in a prison or suspended prison sentence: will not be disclosed after 11 years from the date of the conviction" - does this mean if you received a conviction for a non-violent crime in, say, 2002, it will not appear on a DBS check done now? What if there was community service imposed or a ban on driving etc? Does the 11 years run from the date of the court hearing or from the date the "punishment" ended? Just curious as I'm not sure how this all works!

moominmarvellous Mon 02-Sep-13 23:08:09

I'm really interested in this as two years ago I begun a voluntary role which asked on the application of I had any criminal convictions (not warnings/cautions, just convictions).

When I was 18 I received a 'verbal warning'. Didn't think this was formal at all. It crossed my mind to declare it, but really didn't think it was ever recorded so didn't count as a 'caution'.

Enhanced CRB check 14 years later showed it up as a caution for false accounting! (I gave a cash refund to a friend who had no receipt) Which I realise is technically right but sounds SO terrible. Especially as I'm about to train as a mortage advisor. I was in tears and just felt so ashamed all over again.

But according to the link by PolterGoose, maybe this now wouldn't show up. I really hope that is the case as its really played on my mind again ever since.

It didn't affect my voluntary role in the end as I explained why I didnt declare it, and I'm now in paid employment by the same organisation. But I was so embarrassed by it and hated that the worst part of my past was now part of an employers first impression.

moominmarvellous Mon 02-Sep-13 23:00:19

I'm really interested in this as two years ago I begun a voluntary role which asked on the application of I had any criminal convictions (not warnings/cautions, just convictions).

When I was 18 I received a 'verbal warning'. Didn't think this was formal at all. It crossed my mind to declare it, but really didn't think it was ever recorded so didn't count as a 'caution', so didn't disclose it.

Enhanced CRB check showed it up as a caution for false accounting! (I gave a cash refund to a friend who had no receipt) Which I realise is technically right but sounds SO terrible. Especially as I'm about to train as a mortage advisor. I was in tears and just felt so ashamed all over again.

But according to the link by PolterGoose, maybe this now wouldn't show up. I really hope that is the case as its really played on my mind again ever since.

It didn't affect my voluntary role in the end as I explained why I didnt declare it, but I was so embarrassed by it and hated that the worst part of my past was now part of an employers first impression.

TheTruffleHunter Mon 02-Sep-13 22:43:56

Thanks for your clarifications Poltergoost, I'm now in a position where I'd like to send a highly valued employee on a course which will require a DRB(?) check who has already told me there were a few minor issues as a young teen - given his background I'm surprised it is as minor, but since he has been with us he has really grabbed hold of his second chance and turned over a massive new leaf. I'd hate for his troubled start to be held against him

ILetHimKeep20Quid Mon 02-Sep-13 22:09:24

And that is only in England I'm guessing?

It's a different scheme in Scotland.

BlueHairedFreak Mon 02-Sep-13 21:07:22

CRB checks are no longer carried out, you now have a Disclosure and Barring Check (DBS) , the certificate is only issued to the applicant and not the employer, unless they've registered with a special service.

Admiraltea Mon 02-Sep-13 21:06:57

All is logged afik as a child who "borrowed" a book from the book fair at school could not be talked to by police as over the age of 10 they informed me they would have to formally log it as a caution...I am not police just going on what they tell me when I speak to them.

Admiraltea Mon 02-Sep-13 21:03:01

that is what i was saying...the child did not receive a caution...ffs I only wrote 2 sentences...please read

PolterGoose Mon 02-Sep-13 20:58:25

Admiral a child under 10 cannot receive a caution, in fact cautions are no longer given to under 18s, they get reprimands and warnings instead, but you still have to be 10 to get one. Please read my link, please don't perpetuate the myth that a mistake as a child will ruin your life.

Admiraltea Mon 02-Sep-13 20:55:25

It does show up hardboiled..just not on the copy you get...your employers are obviously very sensible

Admiraltea Mon 02-Sep-13 20:54:21

And it counts on their statistics as a solved crime.

hardboiledpossum Mon 02-Sep-13 20:53:39

I received a caution as a young teen and it has never shown up on any of my crbs, of which i have had many.

Admiraltea Mon 02-Sep-13 20:52:57

Seems to be some confusion ref conviction and caution....as I had it explained to me by police a 10 year old half inching a packet of match attax from asda will get a caution ...on enhanced crb that will show up forever...

Said child was 9 yrs 11 months and 27 days (not mine..hasten to add)

PolterGoose Mon 02-Sep-13 20:48:46

Read this

Old and minor cautions are already filtered out.

ILetHimKeep20Quid Mon 02-Sep-13 20:46:48

Organisations requiring these checks have policies in place, it won't come down to one person's judgement

Blissx Mon 02-Sep-13 20:36:01

But a CRB check isn't carried out for all jobs...

ReallyTired Mon 02-Sep-13 19:59:59

"I don't think employers would hold something like shoplifting when you were 11 against you somehow regardless!"

My line probably would have done! Not all people are illogical

A lot depends on the employer. Most employers probably would not worry about cautions for minor offenses twenty years ago, but some people are very judgemental.

I feel that convictions for minor offenses done as a child should be wiped clean from enchanced enclosures after ten years. A seventeen year old would suffer the consequences until the age of 27 but is it relevent when that person is 30 and a changed person.

It must be really stressful for someone have the worry of a minor caution hanging over their head for life.

ILetHimKeep20Quid Mon 02-Sep-13 19:55:43

A conviction like that does not exclude you as long as you declare honestly when given the chance and are able to talk openly about what happened, what you learnt and how you've moved on

mrsjay Mon 02-Sep-13 19:55:32

Just because a conviction shows up doesnt mean the person wont pass the crb a child can commit terrible crimes at 11 andnot so terrible they all need to show up ,the employers shouldnt discriminate against a shoplifting crime at 11 but might a sexual assault, it is easier for them all to show up,

Remotecontrolduck Mon 02-Sep-13 19:52:16

A one off when you were young should be written off I think.

Several when you were say, 17 (old enough to know the consequences after the first time!) probably should show up, and then reviewed case by case.

I don't think employers would hold something like shoplifting when you were 11 against you somehow regardless!

Blissx Mon 02-Sep-13 19:27:26

So? They may not work with children, not 'never get a job'. How else do you propose protecting a vulnerable proportion of our society?

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