to think that instead of insisting students who don't get C in maths and English continue it post 16, the Government should put a lot more resources into supporting them a lot earlier?

(79 Posts)
kim147 Mon 02-Sep-13 10:38:36

Maths and English are essential skills an employer is looking for. And there's no doubt that many pupils do struggle in these subjects at school. I also recognise that there are students who don't take them seriously at school so possibly the reality at post 16 that they have to do more studying might make them try harder.

However - many pupils do struggle with maths and English and schools do know who they are. So wouldn't it be better if more resources were put in earlier, targeted teaching, specialised teaching for those who have dyscalcula and a focus on the actual maths / English skills employers need rather than "mathematics" - Pythagoras etc which only have specific applications.

Will resources and funding be provided in primary and secondary schools?

jlee1 Sat 30-Nov-13 12:13:14

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Rufus44 Sat 30-Nov-13 12:34:55

I think there should be two options for maths, one the full Monty GCSE and the other covering business maths

The business maths would be straightforward adding and subtracting but based around balancing budgets, maybe a bit of book keeping etc

Leaving algebra, phythagoras theory etc out of the exam. Those things are an absolute bugger and a lot of people never use them again

It's shouldn't be easier to pass as such but it should not deal with "pure" maths

Alisvolatpropiis Sat 30-Nov-13 12:46:36

Yanbu!

I endured years of being told I was under confident with maths. No, I bloody well couldn't do it. I go a C but only because I had a tutor.

It wasn't until I worked in a money handling role after my GCSE's that I "got" it. I could now merrily do everyone's monthly budgets and accounts.

Maths is fetishised at schools in an odd way. It is all purely academic teaching things few will use in real life (Pythagoras theory anyone?) but no teaching children how to manage money. Ridiculous.

ForeverDarkrai Mon 02-Dec-13 16:58:35

I couldn't agree more with this!
I'm now at university in Loughborough but I used to tutor Maths to a couple of girls in Years 2 and 6 and they were both talented but they never had their brains stretched to reach their full potential.. I was told that they were struggling in class but it wasn't because of their ability, it was because they had been working at a much lower level than they should have been and, as a result, they fell behind because they got bored.
But then you have the other side of the table where students may not be as able but then do not get the attention they need.. My younger sister fitted into this boat. It's like some schools (not all!) just try to fit down the middle road when they should be catering for everyone's needs and abilities like they used to.

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