To think 90% of the posts on here are crap

(165 Posts)
MrUFO Mon 26-Aug-13 15:51:32

That are made up just to get some sort of attention. "To the thick heads" this post is not for attention it's to debate the need to post fake crap for attention.

Tuon Mon 26-Aug-13 15:53:24

The term buccaneer derives from the Caribbean Arawak word buccan, a wooden frame for smoking meat, preferably manatee. From this derived the French word boucane and hence the name boucanier for French hunters who used such frames to smoke meat from feral cattle and pigs on Hispaniola (now Haiti and the Dominican Republic).[2] English colonists anglicised the word boucanier to buccaneer.
About 1630, some Frenchmen who were driven away from the island of Hispaniola fled to nearby Tortuga. The Spaniards tried to drive them out of Tortuga, but the buccaneers were joined by many other French, Dutch and English and turned to piracy against Spanish shipping, generally using small craft to attack galleons in the vicinity of the Windward Passage. Finally they became so strong that they even sailed to the mainland of Spanish America and sacked cities.
English settlers occupying Jamaica began to spread the name buccaneers with the meaning of pirates. The name became universally adopted later in 1684 when the first English translation of Alexandre Exquemelin's book The Buccaneers of America was published.
Viewed from London, buccaneering was a low-budget way to wage war on England's rival, Spain. So, the English crown licensed buccaneers with letters of marque, legalizing their operations in return for a share of their profits. The buccaneers were invited by Jamaica's Governor Thomas Modyford to base ships at Port Royal. The buccaneers robbed Spanish shipping and colonies, and returned to Port Royal with their plunder, making the city the most prosperous in the Caribbean. There even were Royal Navy officers sent to lead the buccaneers, such as Christopher Myngs. Their activities went on irrespective of whether England happened to be at war with Spain or France.
Among the leaders of the buccaneers were two Frenchmen: Jean-David Nau, better known as François l'Ollonais, and Daniel Montbars, who destroyed so many Spanish ships and killed so many Spaniards that he was called "the Exterminator". Another noted leader was a Welshman named Henry Morgan, who sacked Maracaibo, Portobello, and Panama City, stealing a huge amount from the Spanish. Morgan became rich and went back to England, where he was knighted by Charles II.
In the 1690s, the old buccaneering ways began to die out, as European governments began to discard the policy of "no peace beyond the Line." Buccaneers were hard to control and might embroil their colonies in unwanted wars. Notably, at the 1697 joint French-buccaneer siege of Cartagena, led by Bernard Desjean, Baron de Pointis, the buccaneers and the French regulars parted on extremely bitter terms. Less tolerated by local Caribbean officials, buccaneers increasingly turned to legal work or else joined regular pirate crews who sought plunder in the Indian Ocean, the east coast of North America, or West Africa as well as in the Caribbean.

SilverApples Mon 26-Aug-13 15:56:57

That's not fake crap, Tuon. That is fascinating information about a specific period in history and it's linguistic legacy.
Yes OP, much of the posting is crap. grin Light entertainment.

MrsHowardRoark Mon 26-Aug-13 15:57:06

Well said Tuon.

everlong Mon 26-Aug-13 15:57:42

OP you're not wrong.

Not one bit.

Tuon. What are you on?

SilverApples Mon 26-Aug-13 15:58:19

Paragraphing would help.
Morgan was successful because he was cautious. He was a crap sailor who lost several ships.

Tuon Mon 26-Aug-13 15:58:32

Wikipedia. Why?

Tittypulumpcious Mon 26-Aug-13 15:58:51

Like this thread?

SilverApples Mon 26-Aug-13 15:59:08

Tuon's on the high seas. sailing the Caribee round Tortuga.
As we should all be.

Thepowerof3 Mon 26-Aug-13 15:59:23

WTF

Yes, it's mostly crap! and the ones that aren't are frankly probably made up!

I need a wine! wink

insummeritrains Mon 26-Aug-13 16:00:16

Tuon, thank you. You learn something new every day.

Tuon Mon 26-Aug-13 16:00:19

Sorry, paragraphs.

The term buccaneer derives from the Caribbean Arawak word buccan, a wooden frame for smoking meat, preferably manatee. From this derived the French word boucane and hence the name boucanier for French hunters who used such frames to smoke meat from feral cattle and pigs on Hispaniola (now Haiti and the Dominican Republic).[2] English colonists anglicised the word boucanier to buccaneer.

About 1630, some Frenchmen who were driven away from the island of Hispaniola fled to nearby Tortuga. The Spaniards tried to drive them out of Tortuga, but the buccaneers were joined by many other French, Dutch and English and turned to piracy against Spanish shipping, generally using small craft to attack galleons in the vicinity of the Windward Passage. Finally they became so strong that they even sailed to the mainland of Spanish America and sacked cities.

English settlers occupying Jamaica began to spread the name buccaneers with the meaning of pirates. The name became universally adopted later in 1684 when the first English translation of Alexandre Exquemelin's book The Buccaneers of America was published.

Viewed from London, buccaneering was a low-budget way to wage war on England's rival, Spain. So, the English crown licensed buccaneers with letters of marque, legalizing their operations in return for a share of their profits. The buccaneers were invited by Jamaica's Governor Thomas Modyford to base ships at Port Royal. The buccaneers robbed Spanish shipping and colonies, and returned to Port Royal with their plunder, making the city the most prosperous in the Caribbean. There even were Royal Navy officers sent to lead the buccaneers, such as Christopher Myngs. Their activities went on irrespective of whether England happened to be at war with Spain or France.
Among the leaders of the buccaneers were two Frenchmen: Jean-David Nau, better known as François l'Ollonais, and Daniel Montbars, who destroyed so many Spanish ships and killed so many Spaniards that he was called "the Exterminator". Another noted leader was a Welshman named Henry Morgan, who sacked Maracaibo, Portobello, and Panama City, stealing a huge amount from the Spanish. Morgan became rich and went back to England, where he was knighted by Charles II.

In the 1690s, the old buccaneering ways began to die out, as European governments began to discard the policy of "no peace beyond the Line." Buccaneers were hard to control and might embroil their colonies in unwanted wars. Notably, at the 1697 joint French-buccaneer siege of Cartagena, led by Bernard Desjean, Baron de Pointis, the buccaneers and the French regulars parted on extremely bitter terms. Less tolerated by local Caribbean officials, buccaneers increasingly turned to legal work or else joined regular pirate crews who sought plunder in the Indian Ocean, the east coast of North America, or West Africa as well as in the Caribbean.

<eats a snickers> Better?

SilverApples Mon 26-Aug-13 16:00:39

Pirates!
It's not even Talk Like A Pirate Day.
Anyone know how the cult of The Flying Spaghetti Monster and Pirates are linked? grin

Thumbwitch Mon 26-Aug-13 16:00:58

I don't believe most of them are made up, but of course they are to get some sort of attention! There wouldn't be ANY point to posting a thread that got no attention (well, not deliberately, anyway).

You have yourself chosen a provocative thread title to ensure that it is looked at - lots of people will choose not to post on it because they CBA - but what was your point in posting this thread, if not for attention, hmm?

MrUFO Mon 26-Aug-13 16:01:39

Read the post again, I included a bit for people who would post the very thing you just have. smile

DidoTheDodo Mon 26-Aug-13 16:01:54

My posts are always great. Or is this a lie?

Boaty Mon 26-Aug-13 16:02:42

Aaarrrrrr! Me 'arties!
grin

Thumbwitch Mon 26-Aug-13 16:02:50

I don't need to read your OP again. YOu have included a completely spurious point. You wanted attention for your thread, you used a provocative title, you have got some attention, some people agree with you, others don't.

Happy?

gordyslovesheep Mon 26-Aug-13 16:02:58

who am I?

HoneyDragon Mon 26-Aug-13 16:03:13

It's a bank holiday Monday
It's still the school holidays
So as far as I can see Mumsnet is operating normally

usualsuspect Mon 26-Aug-13 16:03:37

Yep, most of it is crap.

And what Tuon said.

Thank you Tuon. Good post. grin

TeamEdward Mon 26-Aug-13 16:03:42

The Flying Spaghetti Monster (FSM) is the deity of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster or Pastafarianism, a movement that promotes a light-hearted view of religion and opposes the teaching of intelligent design and creationism in public schools. Although adherents state that Pastafarianism is a genuine religion, it is generally recognized by the media as a parody religion.

The "Flying Spaghetti Monster" was first described in a satirical open letter written by Bobby Henderson in 2005 to protest the Kansas State Board of Education decision to permit teaching intelligent design as an alternative to evolution in public school science classes. In that letter, Henderson satirized creationist ideas by professing his belief that whenever a scientist carbon dates an object, a supernatural creator that closely resembles spaghetti and meatballs is there "changing the results with His Noodly Appendage". Henderson argued that his beliefs and intelligent design were equally valid, and called for Flying Spaghetti Monsterism to be allotted equal time in science classrooms alongside intelligent design and evolution. After Henderson published the letter on his website, the Flying Spaghetti Monster rapidly became an Internet phenomenon and a symbol used against teaching intelligent design in public schools.

Pastafarian tenets are generally satires of creationism. They are presented both on Henderson's Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster website, where he is described as "prophet", and in The Gospel of the Flying Spaghetti Monster, written by Henderson and published by Villiard Press in 2006. The central belief is that an invisible and undetectable Flying Spaghetti Monster created the universe. Pirates are revered as the original Pastafarians (a portmanteau of pasta and Rastafarian), and Henderson asserts that the steady decline in the number of pirates over the years has resulted in global warming, alluding to the concept that correlation does not imply causation. The FSM community currently congregates at Henderson's website to share ideas and crafts devoted to the Flying Spaghetti Monster and post "sightings" of the Flying Spaghetti Monster.

Because of its popularity and exposure, the Flying Spaghetti Monster is often used as a contemporary version of Russell's teapot – an argument that the philosophic burden of proof lies upon those who make unfalsifiable claims, not on those who reject them. The Flying Spaghetti Monster has received criticism from proponents of intelligent design. Pastafarians have engaged in religious disputes, including in Polk County, Florida, where they played a role in dissuading the local school board from adopting new rules on teaching evolution.

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